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Imports (including bismuth and tin salts mentioned in the act of 1913) have not been large and have shown a decided decrease since the beginning of the war. The total imports in 1915 were valued at $24,685. Imports of silver salts amounted in 1914 to about 306 pounds, mostly from England. Later statistics follow:

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Description and uses.-The chief use of bismuth salts is in medicine and cosmetics. The Pharmacopoeia of the United States lists various bismuth salts. Bismuth chromate and bismuth oxychloride are used to a limited extent as pigments. Other salts and compounds have less important uses.

The above compounds are made from bismuth chloride or bismuth nitrate, which are obtained by the action of hydrochloric and nitric acids, respectively, on metallic bismuth.

Production.-Separate figures for the production of salts of bismuth are not available prior to 1919, when the output of bismuth salts was 502,300 pounds, valued at $1,235,500 (preliminary figures). Imports of bismuth salts during 1914 amounted to 588 pounds, most of which came from Germany. Later statistics are included with those of gold, silver, platinum, and rhodium salts. (Par. 19.) Exports.-Statistics not available.

Important changes in classification.-Separated from gold, silver, platinum, and rhodium salts, etc., because not a precious or rare metal.

Suggested changes.-The substitution of the word "mixtures" for "preparations" would make this paragraph agree with paragraph 19 of H. R. 7456 and with paragraph 65 of the act of 1913.

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CHEMICALS, DRUGS, ETC., WHEN IMPORTED IN CAPSULES, ETC.

Imports (under paragraph 17 of the act of 1913) in packages of 21 pounds or less from 1914, when first shown, to 1918, inclusive, have been valued between $455,491 and $711,016 per year, and have yielded a yearly revenue varying from $91,357 to $142,203. Imports in the form of capsules, etc., amounted to $800,000 in both 1914 and 1915, and yielded a yearly revenue of about $200,000. Later statistics follow:

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CHEMICAL AND MEDICINAL COMPOUNDS, ETC., IN PACKAGES OF 24 POUNDS OR LESS.

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CHEMICAL AND MEDICINAL COMPOUNDS, ETC., IN CAPSULES, PILLS, TABLETS, ETC.

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Exports. Statistics not available.

Important changes in classification. The first portion of the corresponding 1913 paragraph, relating to articles in 2-pound packages or less, has been omitted from H. R. 7456, owing to the litigation which has arisen in its administration. (Reclassification Report, pp. 24, 25.)

Suggested changes.-Page 6, paragraph 21, line 13: Insert "including powders put up in medicinal doses" after "forms."

PARAGRAPH 22.

H. R. 7456.

PAR. 22. Chemical elements, and chemical and medicinal compounds, preparations, mixtures, and salts, distilled and essential oils, expressed and extracted oils, animal oils and greases, ethers and esters, flavoring and other extracts, and natural or synthetic fruit flavors, fruit esters, oils and essences, all the foregoing and their combinations when containing alcohol, and all articles consisting of vegetable or mineral objects immersed or placed in, or saturated with, alcohol, except perfumery and spirit varnishes, and all alcoholic compounds not specially provided for, if containing 20 per centum of alcohol or less, 20 cents per pound and 25 per centum ad valorem; containing more than 20 per centum and not more than 50 per centum of alcohol, 40 cents per pound and 25 per centum ad valorem; containing more than 50 per centum of alcohol, 80 cents per pound and 25 per centum ad valorem.

ACT OF 1909.

PAR. 2. Alcoholic compounds, including all articles consisting of vegetable, animal or mineral objects immersed or placed in, or saturated with, alcohol, not specially provided for in this section, sixty cents per pound and twentyfive per centum ad valorem.

PAR. 3. * ** chemical compounds, mixtures and salts containing alcohol or in the preparation of which alcohol is used, and not specially provided for in this section, fifty-five cents per pound, but in no case shall any of the foregoing pay less than twenty-five per centum ad valorem.

PAR. 65. Medicinal preparations containing alcohol or in the preparation of which alcohol is used, not specially provided for in this section, fifty-five cents per pound, but in no case shall the same pay less than twenty-five per centum ad valorem;

SENATE AMENDMENTS.

ACT OF 1913.

PAR. 16. Chemical and medicinal compounds and preparations, including mixtures and salts, distilled oils, essential oils, expressed oils, rendered oils, greases, ethers, flavoring and other extracts and fruit essences, all the foregoing and their combinations when containing alcohol, and all articles consisting of vegetable or mineral objects immersed or placed in, or saturated with, alcohol, except perfumery and spirit varnishes, and all alcoholic compounds not specially provided for in this section, if containing 20 per centum of alcohol or less, 10 cents per pound and 20 per centum ad valorem; containing more than 20 per centum and not more than 50 per centum of alcohol, 20 cents per pound and 20 per centum ad valorem; containing more than 50 per centum of alcohol, 40 cents per pound and 20 per centum ad valorem.

CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS, MIXTURES AND SALTS, ALCOHOLIC.

Imports of chemical compounds have been chiefly in the class containing 20 per cent of alcohol or less and in 1918 (fiscal year) were valued at $30,387 and yielded a revenue of $6,893. In 1918 imports of the class containing between 20 and 50 per cent of alcohol were valued at $15,382 and yielded a revenue of $7,859; those containing more than 50 per cent of alcohol, at $850, with a revenue of $709.

Imports of medicinal compounds have also been chiefly in the class containing 20 per cent of alcohol or less, and in 1918 were valued at $63,579 and yielded a revenue of $18,422. In 1918 (fiscal year) imports of the class containing between 20 and 50 per cent alcohol were valued at $26,002 and yielded a revenue of $18,400; those compounds containing more than 50 per cent of alcohol were valued at $10,789, with a revenue of $13,284.

Imports of vegetable or mineral objects immersed in alcohol are practically negligible.

Statistics of alcoholic compounds have not been separately reported since 1914. Before then imports decreased from 1,272 pounds, valued at $1.585 in 1910, to 643 pounds, valued at $749 in 1913.

Imports of chemical compounds, mixtures, and salts since 1917 have been as follows:

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CONTAINING MORE THAN 20 PER CENT AND NOT MORE THAN 50 PER CENT ALCOHOL

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Imports of medicinal compounds since 1917 have been as follows:

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CONTAINING MORE THAN 20 PER CENT AND NOT MORE THAN 50 PER CENT OF

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Exports.-Statistics not available.

Important changes in classification.-The phraseology of this paragraph has been slightly modified to agree with changes made in other paragraphs for these articles when not containing alcohol. (Reclassification Report, p. 23).

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Suggested changes.-Page 6, lines 16, 17: "And," between distilled" and "essential" oils and between "expressed" and "extracted" oils should be changed to "or" to avoid a possible construction requiring that the oils shall be both distilled and essential or both expressed and extracted.

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Description and uses.-Gum chicle is a dried milky juice derived from Archas sapota, a tree whose habitat extends from Mexico to Guiana, the principal source of supply being Yucatan. The milky juice derived from incisions in the bark is boiled and allowed to

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