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(ACT of April 19th, 1816.) for, when formed, shall ratify the boundaries aforesaid; otherwise they shall be and remain as now prescribed by the ordinance for the government of the territory northwest of the river Ohio: Provided also, That the said state shall have concurrent jurisdiction on the river Wabash, with the state to be formed west thereof, so far as the said river shall form a common boundary to both.

Sec. III. (Representatives to form a Convention apportioned among the counties.]

3. Sec. iv. The members of the convention, thus duly elected, are hereby authorized to meet at the seat of the government of the said territory, on the second Monday of June next, which convention, when met, shall first determine, by a majority of the whole number elected, whether it be, or be not expedient, at that

me, to form a constitution and state government, for the people within the said territory, and if it be determined to be expedient, the convention shall be, and hereby are authorized, to form a constitution and state government: or if it be deemed more expedient the said convention shall provide by ordinance for electing representatives to form a constitution, or frame of government; which said representatives shall be chosen in such manner, and in such proportion, and shall meet at such time and place, as shall be prescribed by the said ordinance, and shall then form, for the people of said territory, a constitution and state government: Provided, That the same, whenever formed, shall be republican, and not repugnant to those articles of the ordinance of the thirteenth of July, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, which are declared to be irrevocable between the original states, and the people and states of the territory northwest of the river Ohio; excepting so much of said articles as relate to the boundaries of the states therein to be formed.

4. Sec. v. Until the next general census shall be taken, the said state shall be entitled to one representative in the house of representatives of the United States.

5. Sec. vi, The following propositions, are hereby offered to the convention of the said territory of Indiana, when formed, for their free acceptance or rejection, which, if accepted by the convention, shall be obligatory upon the United States.

First. That the section numbered sixteen, in every township, and when such section has been sold, granted or disposed of, other lands, equivalent thereto, and most contiguous to the same, shall be granted to the inhabitants of such township for the use of schools.

Second. That all salt springs within the said territory, and the land reserved for the use of the same, together with such other lands as may, by the president of the United States, be deemed necessary and proper for working the said salt springs, not exceeding, in the whole, the quantity contained in thirty-six entire sections shall be granted to the said state, for the use of the peo

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(RESOLUTION of December 11th, 1816.) ple of the said state, the same to be used under such terms, conditions, and regulations as the legislature of the said state shall direct: provided the said legislature shall never sell nor lease the same, for a longer period than ten years at any one time.

Third. That five per cent. of the net proceeds of the lands ly. ing within the said territory, and which shall be sold by Congress from and after the first day of December next, after deducting all expenses incident to the same, shall be reserved for making public roads and canals, of which three-fifths shall be applied to those objects within the said state, under the direction of the legislature thereof, and two-fifths to the making of a road or roads leading to the said state under the direction of Congress,

Fourth. That one entire township, which shall be designated by the president of the United States, in addition to the one heretofore reserved for that purpose, shall be reserved for the use of a seminary of learning, and vested in the legislature of the said state, to be appropriated solely to the use of such seminary by the said legislature.

Fifth. That four sections of land be, and the same are hereby granted to the said state, for the purpose of fixing their seat of gorernment thereon, which four sections shall, under the direction of the legislature of said state, be located at any time, in such township and range, as the legislature aforesaid may select, on such lands as may hereafter be acquired by the United States, from the Indian tribes within the said territory: Provided, That such locations shall be made prior to the public sale of the lands of the United States, surrounding such location: And provided always, That the five foregoing propositions, herein offered, are, on the conditions that the convention of the said state shall provide by an ordinance irrevocable, without the consent of the United States, that every and each tract of land sold by the United States, from and after the first day of December next, shall be and remain exempt from any tax, laid by order or under any authority of the state, whether for state, county or township, or any other purpose whatever, for the term of five years, from and after the day of sale.

RESOLUTION of December 11th, 1816.

For admitting the state of Indiana into the Union. 6. Whereas, in pursuance of an act of congress, passed on the nineteenth day of April, one thousand eight hundred and sixteen, entitled “ An act to enable the people of the Indiana territory to form a constitution and state government, and for the admission of that state into the Union, the people of the said territory did, on the twenty-ninth day of June, in the present year, by a convention called for that purpose, form for themselves a constitution and state government, which constitution and state

(ACT of May 13th, 1800.) government, so formed, is republican, and in conformity with the principles of the articles of compact between the original states and the people and states in the territory northwest of the river Ohio, passed on the thirteenth day of July, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven.

Resolved, That the state of Indiana shall be one, and is hereby declared to be one of the United States of America, and admitted into the Union on an equal footing with the original states, in all respects whatever.

ACT of March 3d, 1819. Pamphlet edit. 80. 7. Sec. i. Instead of four sections provided to be located under the direction of the legislature of the state of Indiana, and to be granted for the purpose of fixing thereon the seat of ment of that state, it shall be lawful to locate, for that purpose, under the direction of the legislature aforesaid, any contiguous quarter sections, fractions or parts of sections, not to exceed in the whole, the quantity contained in four entire sections: Such locations shall be made before the commencement of the public sales, of the adjoining and surrounding lands belonging to the United States.

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INDIANS.

18, 30

Rations to be furnished,
1 Crimes committed by Indians,

16 Presents,

2 Jurisdiction of courts, 17, 19, 20, 29 Boundary line to be ascertained, 3, 22 Military force to be employed, Penalty for crossing it without license, 4,5 Liquors not to be sold, &c.

23 Crimes within Indian boundary, 6,8 Trading houses, Settlement and residence, 7, 9, 10 Superintendent and agents, 25, 27, 31 Purchases from Indians,

11 to 14 Funds, Civilization promoted,

15, 32 | Licences to trade with Indians, [See Crimes and Punishments, 47.]

24, 33

26 23

ACT of May 13th, 1800. 3 Bioren, 400. 1. Sec. 1. The president of the United States, hereby is authorized and empowered, to cause such rations as he shall judge proper, and as can be spared from the army provisions, without injury to the service, to be issued, under such regulations as he shall think fit to establish, to Indians who may visit the military posts of the United States on the frontiers, or within their respective nations.

(ACT of March 30th, 1802.) 2. Sec. 11. The president of the United States, hereby is further authorized and empowered, to cause to be defrayed on the part of the United States, the reasonable expenses of such Indians as may from time to time visit the seat of government thereof, for their journey to, stay at, and return from the same; and also to cause to be given to such Indians, during their stay as aforesaid, such presents as he shall judge necessary.

SEC. III. A separate account of all rations issued, and expenses defrayed as aforesaid, and of the expenditures occasioned by such presents, shall be kept at the department of war.

ACT of March 30th, 1802. 3 Bioren, 460. An act to regulate trade and intercourse with the Indian tribes, and to preserve

peace on the frontiers. 3. Sec. 1. The following boundary line, established by treaty between the United States, and various Indian tribes, shall be clearly ascertained, and distinctly marked in all such places as the president of the United States shall deem necessary, and in such manner as he shall direct, to wit: Beginning at the mouth of the Cayahoga river, on lake Erie, and running thence, up the same, to the portage between that and the Tuscaroras branch of the Muskingum; thence down that branch, to the crossing place above Fort Lawrence; thence, westwardly, to a fork of that branch of the Great Miami river running into the Ohio; at or near which fork stood Laromie's store, and

where commences the portage, between the Miami of the Ohio and St. Mary's river, which is a branch of the Miami, which runs into lake Erie; thence, a westwardly course, to Fort Recovery, which stands on a branch of the Wa. bash; thence, southwestwardly, in a direct line to the Ohio, so as to intersect that river opposite the mouth of Kentucky or Cuttawa river; thence, down the said river Ohio, to the tract of one hundred and fifty thousand acres, near the rapids of the Ohio, which has been assigned to general Clarke, for the use of himself and his warriors; thence, around the said tract, on the line of the said tract, till it shall again intersect the said river Ohio; thence, down the same, to a point opposite the high lands, or ridge, between the mouth of the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers; thence, southeastwardly, on the said ridge to a point, from whence a southwest line will strike the mouth of Duck river; thence, still eastwardly, on the said ridge, to a point forty miles above Nashville; thence, northeast, to Cumberland river; thence, up the said river, to where the Kentucky road crosses the same; thence, to the Cumberland Mountain, at the point of Campbell's line; thence, in a southwestwardly direction, along the foot of the Cumberland Mountain, to Emory's river; thence, down the same, to its junction with the river Clinch; thence, down the river Clinch to Hawkins's line; thence, along the same to a white oak, marked one mile Tree; thence, south, fifty-one degrees west, three hundred and

(ACT of March 30th, 1802.) twenty-eight chains, to a large ash tree on the bank of the river Tennessee, one mile below Southwest Point; thence, up the northeast margin of the river Tennessee, (not including islands,) to the Wild Cat Rock below Tellico block house; thence, in a direct line, to the Militia Spring, near the Maryville road leading from Tellico; thence, from the said spring, to the Chilhowee mountain, by a line so to be run as will leave all the farms on Nine Mile Creek to the northward and eastward of it, and to be continued along the Chilhowee mountain until it strikes Hawkins's line; thence, along the said line, to the great Iron Mountain; and from the top of which a line to be continued, in a southestwardly course, to where the most southern branch of Little river crosses the divisional line to Tugaloo river; thence, along the South Carolina Indian boundary, to and over the Ocunna mouutain, in a southwest course, to Tugaloo river; thence, in a direct line, to the top of Currahee mountain, where the Creek line passes it; thence, to the head or source of the main south branch of the Oconee river, called the Appalachee; thence, down the middle of the said main south branch and river Oconee, to its confluence with Oakmulgee, which forms the river Altamaha; thence, down the middle of the said Altamaha, to the old line on the said river; and thence, along the said old line, to the river St. Mary's: Provided always, That if the boundary line between the said Indian tribes and the United States, shall, at any time hereafter, be varied, by any treaty which shall be made between the said Indian tribes and the United States, then all the provisions contained in this act shall be construed to apply to the said line so to be varied, in the same manner as said provisions apply, by force of this act, to the boundary line herein before recited.

4. Sec. 11. If any citizen of, or other person resident in, the United States, or either of the territorial districts of the United States, shall cross over, or go within the said boundary line, to hunt, or in anywise destroy the game; or shall drive, or otherwise convey, any stock of horses or cattle, to range on any lands allotted or secured, by treaty with the United States, to any Indian tribes, he shall forfeit a sum not exceeding one hundred dollars, or be imprisoned not exceeding six months.

5. Sec. fit. If any such citizen, or other person, shall go into any country which is allotted or secured, by treaty, as aforesaid, to any of the Indian tribes south of the river Ohio, without a passport first had and obtained from the governor of some one of the United States, or the officer of the troops of the United States commanding at the nearest post on the frontiers, or such other person as the president of the United States may, from time to time, authorize to grant the same, shall forfeit a sum not exceeding fifty dollars, or be imprisoned not exceeding three months.

6. Sec. iv. If any such citizen, or other person, shall go into

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