Imágenes de páginas
PDF

the siege of Yorktown, to very nearly one hundred pieces, and comprised the unusual calibres and enormously heavy weight of metal of two 200-pounders, five 100-pounders, and ten 13inch sea-coast mortars."

As has been before, stated, the chief of artillery reports the whole of the field artillery of the army of the Potomac, July 28, 1861, was comprised of nine imperfectly equipped batteries, of thirty guns, 650 men, and 400 horses. In March, 1862, when the whole army took the field, it consisted of ninety-twyo batteries, of 520 guns, 12,500 men, and ll,000 horses, fully equipped and in readiness for active field service; of the whole force thirty batteries were regulars, and sixty-two batteries volunteers. During the short period of seven months, all of this immense amount of material was issued by the ordnance department and placed in the hands of the artillery troops after their arrival in Washington. About one-fourth of all the volunteer batteries brought with them from their respective States a few guns and carriages, but they were nearly all of such peculiar calibre as to lack uniformity with the more modern and more serviceable ordnance with which the other batteries were armed, and they therefore had to be withdrawn and replaced by more suitable material. While about one-sixth came supplied with horses and harness, less than one-tenth were apparently fully equipped for service when they reported; and every one of these required the supply of many deficiencies of material, and very extensive instruction in the theory and practice of their special arm.

The operations on the Peninsula by the army of the Potomac commenced with a full field artillery force of fifty-two batteries of two hundred and ninety-nine guns. To this must be added the field artillery of Franklin's division of McDowell's corps, which joined a few days before the capture of Yorktown, but was not disembarked from its transports for service until after the battle of Williamsburg, and the field artillery of McCall's division 6f McDowell's corps, (four batteries, twenty-two guns), which joined in June, a few days before the battle of Mechanicsville, (June 26,1862), making a grand total of field artillery, at any time with the army of the Peninsula, of sixty batteries of three hundred and forty-three guns. With this large force, saving in six corps d'armee of eleven divisions, and the artillery reserve, the only general and field officers Were one brigadier general, four colonels, three lieutenant colonels, and three majors, a number obviously insufficient, and which impaired to a great degree, in consequence of the want of rank and official influence of the commanders of corps and division artillery, t}ie efficiency of the arm. As this faulty organization can be suitably corrected only by legislative action, it is earnestly hoped that the attention of the proper authorities may be at an early day invited to it.

When there were so many newly organized volunteer field batteries, many or whom received their first and only instruction in the intrenched camps covering Washington during the three or four inclement months of the winter of 1861~'62, there was, of course, much to be improved. Many of the volunteer batteries, however, evinced such zeal and intelligence,

and availed themselves so industriously of the instructions of the regular officers, their commanders, and the example of the regular batteries, their associates^ that they made rapid progress, and attained a degree of proficiency highly creditable.

The designations of the different batteries of artillery, both regular and volunteer, follow within a few pages.

The following distribution of regiments and batteries was made, as a preliminary organization of the forces at hand, shortly after my arrival in Washington. The infantry, artillery, and cavalry, as fast as collected and brought into primary organization, were assigned to brigades and divisions, as indicated in the subjoined statements.

Organization of the division of the Potomac,
August 4, 1861.

Bi^igadier General Hunter's "brigade.—23d, 25th, 35th, and 37th regiments New York volunteers.

Brigadier General Heintze/man's brigade.— 5th regiment Maine volunteers, 16th, 26th, and 27th New York volunteers, and Tidball's battery, (A), 2d United States artillery.

Brigadier General W. T. Sherman's brigade. —9th and 14th regiments Massachusetts volunteers, DeKalb regiment New York volunteers, 4th regiment Michigan volunteers, Hamilton's battery, (E), 3d United States artillery, and company I, 2d United States cavalry.

Brigadier General Kearney's brigade.—1st, 2d, and 3d regiments New Jersey volunteers, Green's battery, (G), 2d United States artillery, and company G, 2d United States cavalry. Brigadier General Hooker's brigade.—1st and 11th regiments Massachusetts volunteers, 2d regiment New Hampshire volunteers, and 26th regiment Pennsylvania volunteers.

Colonel Key's brigade.—22d, 24th, and 30th regiments New York volunteers, and 14th regiment New York State militia.

Brigadier General Franklin's brigade.—15th, 18 th, 31st, and 32d regiments New York volunteers, Piatt's battery, (M), 2d United States artillery, and company C, New York (Lincoln) cavalry.

Colonel Blenkefs brigade.—8th and 27th regiments New York volunteers, 27th regiment Pennsylvania volunteers, and Garibaldi guard, New York volunteers.

Colonel Richardson's brigade.—12th regiment New York volunteers, and 2d and 3d regiments Michigan volunteers.

Brigadier General Stone's brigade.—34th and Tammany regiments New York volunteers, 1st regiment Minnesota volunteers, and 2d regiment New York State militia.

Colonel William F. Smith's brigade.—2d and 3d regiments Vermont volunteers, 6th regiment Maine volunteers, 33d regiment New York volunteers, company H, 2d United States cavalry, and Captain Mott's New York battery.

Colonel Couch's brigade,—2d regiment Rhode Island volunteers, 7th and 10th regiments Massachusetts volunteers, and 36th regiment New York volunteers.

The 2d regiment Maine, the 2d regiment Wisconsin, and the 13th regiment New York volunteers, stationed at Fort Corcoran.

The 21st regiment New York volunteers, sta- j iioned at Fort Runyon. |

The 17th regiment New York volunteers, sta-i feioned at Fort Ellsworth. ]

By October the new levies had arrived in sufficient numbers, and the process of organization so far carried on that the construction of divisions had been effected.

The following statement exhibits the composition of the army, October 15, 1861.

Organization of the army of the Potomac, October 15, 1861.

1. Brigadier General George Stoneman's cavalry command.—5th United States cavalry, 4th Pennsylvania cavalry, Oneida cavalry, (one company), 11th Pennsylvania cavalry, (Harlan's), and Barker's Illinois cavalry, (one company).

2. Colonel II. J. Hunt's artillery reserve.— Batteries L, A, and B, 2d United States artillery, batteries K and F, 3d United States artillery, battery K, 4th United States artillery, battery H, 1st United States artillery, and battery A, 5th United States artillery.

3. CITY GUARD, BRIGADIER GENERAL ANDREW PORTER.

Cavalry.—Companies A and E, 4th United States cavalry.

Artillery.—Battery K. 5th United States artillery.

Infantry.—2d and 3d battalions United States infantry, 8th and 1st companies United States infantry, and Sturgiste rifles, (Illinois volunteers).

4. Banes' Division.

Cavalry—Four companies 3rd regiment New York cavalry, (Van Allen's).

Artillery.—Best's battery E, 4th United States artillery, detachment 9th New York artillery, Matthews's battery E, 1st Pennsylvania artillery, Tompkins's battery A, 1st Rhode Island artillery.

Infantry.—Abercrombie's brigade: 12th Massachusetts, 12th and 16th Indiana, and 30th Pennsylvania volunteers. Stiles's brigade: 3d Wisconsin, 29tii Pennsylvania, and 13th Massathusetts volunteers, and 9th New York State militia. Gordon's brigade: 2d Massachusetts, 28th and 19 th New York, 5th Connecticut, 46th and 28th Pennsylvania, and 1st Maryland volunteers.

M'dowell's Division.

Cavalry.—2d New York cavalry, (Harris's Li^lt), Colonel Davis.

Artillery.—Battery M, 2d, and battery G, 1st United States Artillery.

Infantry.—Keys's brigade: 14th New York State' militia, and 22d, 24th, and 30th New York volunteers. Wadsworth's brigade: 12th 21st, 23d, and 35th New York volunteers. King's brigade: 2d, 6th, and 7th Wisconsin,! and 19th Indiana volunteers.!

HEINTZELMANS DIVISION.

Cavalry.—1st New Jersey cavalry, Colonel Halsted.

Artillery.—Thompson's battery, C, United States artillery.

Infantry.—Richardson's brigade: 2d, 3d, and 5th Michigan, and 37th New York volunteers. Sedgwick's brigade: 3d and 4th Maine, and 38th and 40th New York volunteers. Jameson's brigade: 32d, 63d, 61st, and 45th Pennsylvania volunteers, and Wild Cat reserves, (Pennsylvania volunteers).

F. J. Porter's Division.

Cavalry.—3d Pennsylvania cavalry, Colonel Averill, and 8th Pennsylvania cavalry, Colonel Gregg.

Artillery.— Battery E. 2d, and battery *E, 3d United States artillery.

Infantry. —Morell's brigade: 33d Pennsylvania, 4th Michigan, 9th Massachusetts, and 4th New York volunteers. Martindale's brigade: 13th New York, 2d Maine, and 18th Massachusetts volunteers, and DeKalb regiment New York volunteers. Butterfield's brigade: 50th New York, 83d Pennsylvania, ^ Colonel McLean), 17th and 25th New York Volunteers, and Stockton's independent Michigan regiment

Franklin's Division

Cavalry.—1st New York cavalry. Colonel McReynolds.

Artillery. —Batteries D and G, 2d United States artillery, and Hexamers battery, (New Jersey volunteers).

Infantry.—Kearney's brigade: 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th New Jersey volunteers. Siocum's brigade: 16th, 26th, and 27th New York, and 6th~Maine volunteers. Newton's brigade: 15th 18th, 32st, and 32d New York volunteers.

Stone's Division.

Cavalry.—Six companies 3d New York (Van Allen) cavalry.

Artillery. —Kirby's battery I, 1st United States, Vaughn's battery B, 1st Rhode Island artillery, and Bunting's 6th New York independent battery.

Infantry.—Gorman's brigade: 2nd New York State militia, 1st Minnesota, 15th Massachusetts, and 34th New York volunteers, and Tammany regiment, (New York volunteers). Lander's brigade: 19th and 20th Massachusetts, and 7th Michigan volunteers, and a company of Massachusetts sharpshooters. Baker's brigade: Pennsylvania volunteers, (1st, 2d, and 3d California).

Shell's Division.

Artillery.— Batteries D and H, 1st Pennsylvania artillery. *fc

Infantry.—Couch's brigade: 2d Rhode Island 7th and 10th Massachusetts, and 36th New Yorfe volunteers. Graham's Brigade: 23d and 31st Pennsylvania, and 67th (1st Long Island) and 65th (1st United States chasseurs) New York Volunteers. Peck's brigade: 13th and 21st Pennsylvania, and 62d (Anderson's Zouaves) and 55th New York volunteers.

* This battery

vrns transferred to Sherman's expedi

M'call's Division.

Cavalry.—1st Pennsylvania reserve cavalry, Colonel Bayard.

Artillery.—Easton's battery A, Cooper's battery B, and Kein's battery G, 1st Pennsylvania artillery.

Infantry.—Meade's brigade: 1st rifles Pennsylvania reserves, 4th, 3d, 7th, 11th, and 2d Pennsylvania reserve infantry. brigade: 5th, 1st, and 8th Pennsylvania reserve

infantry. brigade: 10th, 6th, 9th and

12th Pennsylvania reserve infantry.

Hooker's Division.

Cavalry.—Eight companies 3d Indiana cavalry, Lieutenant Colonel Carter.

Artillery. — Elder's battery E, 1st United States artillery.

Infantry. brigade: 1st and 11th

Massachusetts, 2d New Hampshire, 26th Pennsylvania, and 1st Michigan volunteers. Sickles's brigade: 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, and 5th regiments Excelsior brigade, New York volunteers.

Blenker's Brigade.

Cavalry.—4th New York cavalry (mounted rifles,) Colonel Dickel.

Artillery.—One battery.

Infantry.—8th and 29th New York, 27th and 35th Pennsylvania volunteers, Garabaldi guard and Cameron rifles, (New York volunteers).

Smith's Division.

Cavalry.—5th Pennsylvania cavalry, (Came-, ron dragoons), Colonel Friedman.

Artillery.—Ay re's battery F, 5th United States artillery, Mott's 2d New York independent battery, and Barr's battery E, 1st Pennsylvania artillery.

Infantry. brigade: 2d, 3rd, 4th,

and 5th Vermont volunteers. Stevens's brigade: 35th and 49th New York and 6th Maine volunteers, and *79th New York State militia. Hancock's brigade: *47th and 49th Pennsylvania, 43rd New York, and 5th Wisconsin volunteers. Companies B and E, Berden's sharpshooters.

Casey's provisional brigades.—5th, 6th, and 7th New Jersey volunteers, *Round-Head regiment, (Pennsylvania volunteers), battalion District of Columbia volunteers, 40th. Pennsylvania, 8th New Jersey, and 4th New Hampshire volunteers.

5. Garrison of Alexandria.—Brigadier General Montgomery, military governor. Cameron guard, (Pennsylvania volunteers).

Garrison of Fort Albany.—14th Massachusetts volunteers.

* The 79th New York State militia, the 47th Pennsylvania volunteers, and the Round-Head regiment, were transferred to General Sherman's expedition.

Garrison of Fort Richardson.—4th Connecticut volunteers.

Garrison of Fort Washington.— Company D, 1st United States artillery, companies H and I, 37th New York volunteers, and United States recruits unassigned.

6. DIX'S DIVISION, BALTIMORE.

Cavalry.—Company of Pennsylvania cavairy.

Artillery.— Battery I, 2d United States artillery, 2d Massachusetts light battery, and a battery of New York artillery.

Infantry.—3d, 4th, and 5th New York, 17th and 25th Massachusetts, 21st Indiana, 6th Michigan, 4th Wisconsin, 7th Maine, 2d Maryland battalion, and Reading city guard, volunteers.

m On the 8th of March, 1862, the President directed, by the following order, the organization of the active portion of the army of the Potomac into four army corps, and the forma tion of a fifth corps from the division of Banke and Shields.

The following is the text of the President'* order:

"[President's General War Order No. 2].

"Executive Mansion,

"Washington, March 8, 1862.

"Ordered, 1st. That the major general commanding the army of the Potomac proceed forthwith to organize that part of the said army destined to enter upon active operations, (including the reserve, but excluding the troops to be left in the fortifications about Washington,) into four army corps, to be commanded according to seniority of rank, as follows:

"First corps to consist of four divisions, and to be commanded by Major General I. McDowell. Second corps to consist of three divisions, and to be commanded by Brigadier General E. V. Sumner. Third corps to consist of three divisions, and to be commanded by Brigadier General S. P. Heintzelman. Fourth corps to consist of three divisions and to be commanded by Brigadier General E. D. Keyes.

"2. That the divisions now commanded by the officers above assigned to the commands of army corps shall be embraced in and form part of their respective corps.

"3. The forces left for the defence of Washington will be placed in command of Brigadier General James Wadswrorth, who shall also be military governor of the District of Columbia.

"4. That this order be executed with such promptness and despatch as not to delay the commencement of the operations already directed to be undertaken by the army of the Potomac.

"5th. A fifth army corps, to be commanded by Major General N. P. Banks, will be fori^ed from his own and General Shields's (late General Lander's) division.

{* Abraham Lincoln."

The following order, which was made as soon as circumstances permitted, exhibits the steps taken to carry out the requirements of the President's war order No. 2:

KEPORT OF GENERAL GEORGE B. M'clellatst.

13

"AHMY CORPS.

"headquarters Army Of The Potomac, "Fairfax Court-house, Van March 13, '62.

General Orders No. 151.]

"In compliance with the President's war order No. 2, March 8, 1862, the active portion of the army of the Potomac is formed into armycorps, as follows:

"First corps, Major General Irwin McDowell, to consist for the present of the divisions of Franklin, McCall, and King. Second corps, Brigadier General E. V. Sumner; divisions, Richardson, Blenker, and Sedgwick. Third corps, Brigadier General S. P. Heintzelman; divisions, F. J. Porter, Hooker, and Hamilton. Fourth corps, Brigadier General E."'D. Keyes; divisions, Couch, Smith and Casey. Fifth corps, Major General N. P. Banks,* divisions, Williams and Shields.

"The cavalry regiments attached to divisions will, for the present, remain so. Subsequent orders will provide for these regiments, as well as for the reserve artillery. Regular infantry and regular savalry arrangements will be made to unite the divisions of each army eorps as promptly as possible.

"The commanders of divisions will at once report in person, or where that is impossible, by .letter, to the commander of their army corps.

"By command of Major General MoClellan. "A. V. Colburn, "Assistant Adjutant General"

I add a statement of the organization and composition of the troops on April 1, commencing with the portion of the army of the Potomac which went to the Peninsula, giving afterwards the regiments and batteries left on the Potomac, and in Maryland and Virginia after April 1, 1862.

Troops of the army of the Potomac sent to thea Peninsula in March and early in April, 1862.

1st. Cavalry reserve, Brigadier General P. St. G. Cooke.—Emery's brigade: 5th United States cavalry; 6th United States cavalry; 6th Pennsylvania cavalry. ^ Blake's brigade: 1st United States cavalry;" 8th Pennsylvania cavalry; Barker's squadron Illinois cavalry.

2d. Artillery reserve, Colonel Henry J. Hunt: Graham's battery K and G, 1st United States, 6 Napoleon guns; Randall's battery E, 1st United States, 6 Napoleon guns; Carlisle's battery E, 2d United States, 6 20-pounder Parrott guns; Robertson's battery, 2d United States, 6 3-inch ordnance guns; Benson's battery M, 2d United States, 6 3-inch ordnance guns; Tidball's battery A, 2d United States, 6 3-inch ordnance guns; Edwards's battery L and M, 3d United States, 6 10-pounder Parrott guns; Gibson's battery C and G, 3d United States, 6 3-inch ordnance guns; Livingston's battery F and K, 3d United States, 4 10-pounder Parrott guns; Howe's battery G, 4th United States, 6 Napoleon guns; De Russy's battery K, 4th United States, 6 Napoleon guns; Weed's battery I, 5th United States, 6 34nch ordnance guns; Smead's battery K, 5th United States, 4 Napoleon guns; Ames's battery A, 5th United

States, 6—4 10-pounder Parrott and 2 Napoleon —guns; Diedrick's battery A, New York artillery and battalion, 6 20-pounder Parrott guns; Vogelie's battery B, New York artillery; and battalion, 4 20-pounder Parrott guns; finierim's battery C, New York artillery and battalion, 4 20-pounder Parrott guns; Grimm's battery D, New York artillery and battalion, 6.32-pounder howitzer guns. Total, 100 guns.

3d. Volunteer engineer troops, General Woodbury: 15th New York volunteers; 50th New York volunteers.

Regular engineer troops, Captain Duane: Companies A, B, and C, United States engineers.

Artillery troops, with siege trains: 1st Connecticut heavy artillery, Colonel Tyler.

4th. Infantry reserve, (regular, brigade), General Sykes: 9 companies 2d United States infantry, 7 companies 3d United States infantry, 10 companies 4th United States infantry, 10 companies 6th United States infantry, 8 companies 10th and 17th United States infantry, 6 companies 11th United States infantry, 8 companies 12th United States infantry, 9 companies 14th United States infantry, and 5th New York volunteers, Colonel Warren.

SECOND CORPS, GENERAL SUMNER.

Cavalry.—8th Illinois cavalry, Colonel Farnsworth, and one squadron 6th New York cavalry.

Richardson's Division.

Artillery.—Clark's battery A and G, 4th United States, 6 Napoleon Guns; Frank's battery G, 1st New York, 6 10-pounder Parrott guns; Pettit's battery B, 1st New York, 6 10-pounder Parrott guns; Hogan's battery A, 2d New York 6 10-pounder Parrott guns.

Infantry. — Howard's brigade: 5th New Hampshire, 81st Pennsylvania, and 61st and 64th New York volunteers. Meagher's brigade: 69th, 63d, and 88th New York volunteers. French's brigade: 52d, 57th, and 66th New York, and 53d Pennsylvania volunteers.

SEDGWICK'S DIVISION.

Artillery. — Kirby's battery I, 1st United States, 6 Napoleon Guns; Tompkin's battery A, 1st Rhode Island, 6—4 10-pounder Parrott and 2 12-pounder howitzer—guns; Bartlett'sbattery B, 1st Rhode Island, 6—4 10-pounder Parrott and 2 12-pounder howitzer—guns; Owen's battery G, 6 3-inch ordnance guns.

Infantry.—Gorman's brigade: 2d New York State militia, and 15th Massachusetts, 34th New York? and 1st Maine volunteers. Burns's brigade: 69th, 7lst, 72d, and 106th Pennsylvania volunteers. Dana's brigade: 19th and 20th Massachusetts, 7th Michigan, and 42d New York volunteers.

Note.—Blenker's division detached and assigned to the mountain department.

THIRD CORPS, GEN. HEINTZELMAN.

Captiry.—3d Pennsylvania cavalry, Colonel AverilL

PORTER'S DIVISION.

Artillery.—Griffin's battery K, 5th United States, 6 10-pounder Parrott guns: Weeden's battery C, Rhode Island; Martin's battery C, Massachusetts, 6 Napoleon guns; Allen's battery E, Massachusetts, 6 3-inch ordnance guns.

Infantry,—Martindale's brigade: 2d Maine, 18th an'i 22d Massachusetts, and 25th and 13th New York volunteers. Morell's brigade: 14th New York, 4th Michigan, 9th Massachusetts, and 62d Pennsylvania volunteers. Butterfield's brigade: 17th, 44th, and 12th New York, 83d Pennsylvania, and Stockton's Michigan volunteers.

First Berdan sharpshooters.

Hooker's Division.

Artillery. —Hall's battery H, 1 st United States, 6—4 10-pounder Parrott and 2 12-pounder howitzer—guns ; Smith's battery, 4th New York, 6 10-pounder Parrott guns; Bramhall's battery, 6ch New York, 6 3-inch ordnance guns; Osborn's battery D, 1st New York artillery, 4 3-inch ordnance guns.

Infantry.—Sickles's brigade: 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, and 5th Excelsior, New York. Naglee's brigade: 1st and 11th Massachusetts, 26th Pennsylvania, and 2d New Hampshire volunteers. Coloael Starr's brigade: 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th New Jersey volunteers.

Hamilton's Division.

Artillery.—Thompson's battery G, 2d United States, 6 Napoleon guns; Beam's battery B, New Jersey, 6—4 10-pounder Parrott and 2 Napoleon—guns; Randolph's battery E, Rhode Island, 6—4 10-pounder Parrott and 2 Napoleon—guns.

Infantry.—Jameson's brigade: 105th, 63d, and 57th Pennsylvania, and 87th New York volunteers. Birney's brigade: 38th and 40th New York, and 3d and 4th Maine volunteers.

-— brigade: 2d, 3d, and 5th Michigan,

and 37th New York volunteers.

FOURTH CORPS, GENERAL KEYE3. Couch's Division.

ArtUleryK—McCarthy's battery C, 1st Pennsylvania, 4 10-pounder Parrott guns; Flood's battery D, 1st Pennsylvania, 4 10-pounder Parrott guns; Miller's battery E, 1st Pennsylvania, 4 Napoleon guns; Brady's battery F, 1st Pennsylvania, 4 10-pounder Parrott guns.

Infantry.—Graham's brigade: 67th (1st Long Island) and 65th (1st United States chasseurs) New York, 23d, 31st, and 61st Pennsylvania volunteers. Peck's brigade: 98th, 102d, and 93d Pennsylvania, and 62d and 55th New York

volunteers. brigade: 2d Rhode Island,

7th and 10th Massachusetts, and 36th New York volunteers.

Smith's Division.

Artillery.—Ayre's battery F, 5th United States, 6—4 10-pouuder Parrott and 2 Napoleon—guns; Mottfs battery, 3d New York, 6 4 10-pounder Parrott and 2 Napoleon—guns; Wheeler's bat

tery E, 1st New York, 4 3-inch ordnance gunsj Kennedy's battery, 1st New York, 6 3-inch ordnance guns.

Infantry.—Hancock's brigade: 4th Wisconsin, 49th Pennsylvania, 43d New York, and 6th Maine volunteers. Brooks's brigade: 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th Vermont volunteers. Davidson's brigade: 33d, 77th, and 49th New York, and 7th Maine volunteers.

CASEY'S DIVISION.

Artillery.—Regan's battery, 7th New York, 6 3-inch ordnance guns; Fitch's 8th New York, 6 5-inch ordnance guns; Bates's battery A, 1st New York, 6 Napoleon guns; Spratt's battery H, 1st New York, 4 3-inch ordnance guns.

Infantry.—Keim's brigade: 85th, 101st, and 103d Pennsylvania, and 96 th New York volunteers. Palmer's brigade: 85th, 98th, 92d, 81st, and 9*d New York volunteers. brigade: 104th and 52d Pennsylvania, 56th and 100th New York, and 11th Maine volunteers.

5th. Provost guard: 2d United States cavalry; battalions 8th and 17th United States infantry.

At general headquarters: 2 companies 4th United States cavalry; 1 company Oneida cavalry, (New York volunteers); and 1 company Sturges's rifles, (Illinois Volunteers).

The following troops of the army of the Potomac were left behind, or detached on and in front of the Potomac for the defence of that line, April 1, 1862. Franklin's and McCalFs divisions, at subsequent and different dates, joined the active portion of the army on the Peninsula. Two brigades $f Shields's division joined at Harrison's landing:

FIRST CORPS, GENERAL McDOWELL.

Cavalry.—1st, 2d, and 4th New York, m& 1st Pennsylvania.

. Sharpshooters.—2d regiment Berdan's sharpshooters.

Franklin's Division.

Artillery.— Piatt's battery D, 2d United States, 6 Napoleon guns; Porter's battery A, Massachusetts, 6—4 10-pounder Parrott and 2 12pounder howitzer—guns; Hexamer's battery A, New Jersey, 6—4 10-pounder Parrott and 2 12--pounder howitzer—guns; Wilson's battery F, 1st New York artillery, 4 3-inch ordnance guns.

Infantry.—Kearney's brigade: 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th New Jersey volunteers. Slocum's brigade: 16th and 27th New York, 5th Maine, and 96th Pennsylvania volunteers. Newton's brigade: 18th, 31st, and 32d New York, and 95th Pennsylvania volunteers.

M'call's 'division.

Artillery. —Seymour's battery C, 5th United States, Q Najxdeoh guns; Eastoh's battery A, 1st Pennsylvania, 4 Napoleon guns; Cooper's battery B, 1st Pennsylvania, 6 10-pounder Parrott guns; Kein's battery C, 1st Pennsylvania, 6—2 10-pounder and 4 12-pounder Parrott— guns.

Infantry. —^Reynolds's brigade: 1st, 2d, 5th

« AnteriorContinuar »