Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

STATUTE II.
August 10,1790. Chap. XXXIX.-An Act making further provision for the payment of the debts

of the United States. (Obsolete.)

WHEREAS, by an act, intituled “An act for laying a duty on goods, Recital, Act of July 4, wares and merchandises imported into the United States," divers duties 1789, ch. 2. were laid on goods, wares and merchandise so imported, for the dis

charge of the debts of the United States, and the encouragement and protection of manufactures : And whereas the support of government and the discharge of the said debts, render it necessary to increase the

said duties : From and af. Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representater the first of tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That from the present du- and after the last day of December next, the duties specified and laid ties on certain in and by the act aforesaid, shall cease and determine; and that upon specified arti- all goods, wares and merchandise (not herein particularly excepted) and other duties which after the said day shall be brought into the United States, from imposed in lieu any foreign port or place, there shall be levied, collected and paid the thereof.

several and respective duties following, that is to say : Madeira wine of the quality of London particular, per gallon, thirty-five cents; other Madeira wine, per gallon, thirty cents; Sherry wine, per gallon, twentyfive cents; other wines, per gallon, twenty cents; distilled spirits, if more than ten per cent. below proof, according to Dycas's hydrometer, per gallon, twelve cents; if more than five, and not more than ten per cent. below proof, according to the same hydrometer, per gallon, twelve and an half cents; if of proof, and not more than five per cent. below proof, according to the same hydrometer, per gallon, thirteen cents; if above proof, but not exceeding twenty per cent, according to the same hydrometer, per gallon, fifteen cents; if of more than twenty, and not more than forty per cent. above proof, according to the same hydrometer, per gallon, twenty cents; if of more than forty per cent. above proof, according to the same hydrometer, per gallon, twenty-five cents; molasses, per gallon, three cents; beer, ale and porter in casks, per gallon, five cents; beer, ale and porter in bottles, per dozen, twenty cents. Teas from China and India, in ships or vessels of the United States, bohea, per pound, ten cents; souchong and other black teas, per pound, eighteen cents; hyson, per pound, thirty-two cents; other green teas, per pound, twenty cents : Teas from Europe, in ships or vessels of the United States, bohea, per pound, twelve cents; souchong and other black teas, per pound, twenty-one cents; hyson, per pound, forty cents; other green teas, per pound, twenty-four cents: Teas from any other place, or in any other ships or vessels, bohea, per pound, fifteen cents; souchong and other black teas, per pound, twenty-seven cents; hyson, per pound, fifty cents; other green teas, per pound, thirty cents; coffee, per pound, four cents; cocoa, per pound, one cent; loaf sugar, per pound, five cents; brown sugar, per pound, one and an half cent; other sugar, per pound, two and an half cents; candles of tallow, per pound, two cents; candles of wax or spermaceti, per pound, six cents; cheese, per pound, four cents; soap, per pound, two cents; pepper, per pound, six cents; pimento, per pound, four cents; manufactured tobacco, per pound, six cents; snuff, per pound, ten cents; indigo, per pound, twentyfive cents; cotton, per pound, three cents; nails and spikes, per pound, one cent; bar and other lead, per pound, one cent; steel unwrought, per one hundred and twelve pounds, seventy-five cents; hemp, per one hundred and twelve pounds, fifty-four cents; cables, per one hundred and twelve pounds, one hundred cents; tarred cordage, per one hundred and twelve pounds, one hundred cents; untarred cordage and yarn, per one hundred and twelve pounds, one hundred and fifty cents; twine and pack thread, per one hundred and twelve pounds, three hundred cents; salt, per bushel, twelve cents; malt, per bushel, ten cents; coal,

per bushel, three cents; boots, per pair, fifty cents; shoes, slippers and goloshoes, made of leather, per pair, seven cents; shoes and slippers, made of silk or stuff, per pair, ten cents; wool and cotton cards, per dozen, fifty cents; playing cards, per pack, ten cents; all China ware, looking glasses, window and other glass, and all manufactures of glass, (black quart bottles excepted) twelve and an half per centum ad valorem; marble, slate and other stones, bricks, tiles, tables, mortars and other

Also on cer. utensils of marble or slate, and generally all stone and earthen ware, tain other arti.

cles certain blank books, writing paper, and wrapping paper, paper hangings, paste

rates per cent. boards, parchment and vellum, pictures and prints, painters' colors, in- um ad valorem. cluding lampblack, except those commonly used in dyeing, gold, silver and plated ware, gold and silver lace, jewellery and paste work, clocks and watches, shoe and knee buckles, grocery, (except the articles before enumerated) namely, cinnamon, cloves, mace, nutmegs, ginger, anniseed, currants, dates, figs, plums, prunes, raisins, sugar candy, oranges, lemons, limes, and generally all fruits and comfits, olives, capers and pickles of every sort, oil, gun-powder, mustard in flour, ten per centum ad valorem; cabinet wares, buttons, saddles, gloves of leather, hats of beaver, felt, wool, or a mixture of any of them, millinery ready made, castings of iron, and slit and rolled iron, leather tanned or tawed, and all manufactures of which leather is the article of chief value, except such as are herein otherwise rated, canes, walking sticks and whips, clothing ready made, brushes, anchors, all wares of tin, pewter, or copper, all or any of them, medicinal drugs, except those commonly used in dyeing, carpets and carpeting, all velvets, velverets, satins and other wrought silks, cambrics, muslins, muslinets, lawns, laces, gauzes, chintzes, and colored calicoes, and nankeens, seven and an half per centum ad valorem. All goods, wares and merchandise imported directly from China or India in ships or vessels not of the United States, teas excepted, twelve and an half per centum ad valorem. All coaches, chariots, phaetons, chaises, chairs, solos or other carriages, or parts of carriages, fifteen and an half per centum ad valorem; and five per centum ad valorem upon all other goods, wares and merchandise, except bullion, tin in pigs, tin plates, old pewter, brass teutenague, iron and brass wire, copper in plates, saltpetre, plaister of Paris, wool, dyeing woods, and dyeing drugs, raw hides and skins, undressed furs of every kind, the sea stores of ships or vessels, the clothes, books, household furniture, and the tools or implements of the trade or profession of persons who come to reside in the United States, philosophical apparatus, specially imported for any seminary of learning, all goods intended to be re-exported to a foreign port or place, in the same ship or vessel in which they shall be imported, and generally, all articles of the growth, product or manufactures of the United States.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That an addition of ten per centum Also an addishall be made to the several rates of duties above specified and imposed, tional duty of

ten per centum in respect to all goods, wares and merchandise, which, after the said last day of December next, shall be imported in ships or vessels not of the of duty before United States, except in the cases in which an additional duty is herein specified. before specially laid on any goods, wares, or merchandises, which shall be imported in such ships or vessels.

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That all duties which shall be Drawback for paid or secured to be paid by virtue of this act, shall be returned or goods exported

within twelve discharged in respect to all such goods, wares or merchandise, where- months. upon they shall have been so paid, or secured to be paid, as, within twelve calendar months after payment made or security given, shall be exported to any foreign port or place, except one per centum on the amount of the said duties, which shall be retained as an indemnification for whatever expense may have accrued concerning the same. Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That there shall be allowed and

Q

on all the rates

Bounty on paid on dried and pickled fish, of the fisheries of the United States, and exportation of dried or pickled on other provisions salted within the said states, which, after the said fish, and salted last day of December next, shall be exported therefrom to any foreign provisions. port or place, in lieu of a drawback of the duty on the salt which shall

have been expended thereupon, according to the following ratesnamely: Dried fish, per quintal, ten cents; pickled fish and other salted

provisions, per barrel, ten cents. Duties or draw. Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That where duties by this act are back on a speimposed, or drawbacks allowed on any specific quantity of goods, wares cific quantity of goods, to apply

and merchandise, the same shall be deemed to apply in proportion to in proportion as any quantity, more or less, than such specific quantity. to other quanti. Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That all the duties which, by ties, · Duties accru

virtue of the act, intituled “An act for laying a duty on goods, wares ing within a cer. and merchandises imported into the United States," accrued between tain time remit- the time specified in the said act for the commencement of the said ted. Act of July

duties, and the respective times when the collectors entered upon the 4, 1739, ch. 2. duties of their respective offices in the several districts, be, and they are

hereby remitted and discharged, and that in any case in which they may

have been paid to the United States, restitution thereof shall be made. Continuance of Sec. 7. And be it further enacted, That the several duties imposed the duty by this by this act shall continue to be collected and paid, until the debts and act imposed.

purposes for which they are pledged and appropriated, shall be fully discharged: Provided, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to prevent the legislature of the United States from substituting other duties or taxes of equal value to any or all of the said duties and imposts.

APPROVED, August 10, 1790.

STATUTE II.

August 10,1790. Chap. XL.-An Act to enable the Officers and Soldiers of the Virginia Line on

continental Establishment, to obtain Tätles to certain Lands lying northwest of Act of June 9,

the River Ohio, between the Little Miami and Sciota.(a) 1794, ch. 62.

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa[Repealed.)

tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the act of Congress of the seventeenth of July, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight, relative to certain locations and surveys made by, or on account of the Virginia troops on continental establishment upon lands between the Little Miami and Sciota rivers, northwest of the

Ohio, be, and the same is hereby repealed. (6) (a) The acts relative to Virginia land warrants, and the regulations and locations thereof, have been : Act of August 10, 1790, chap. 40 ; act of June 9, 1794, chap. 62; act of May 13, 1800, chap. 59; act of April 26, 1802, chap. 30; act of March 2, 1807, chap. 21; act of March 16, 1810, chap. 23; act of June 26, 1812, chap. 109; act of November 3, 1814, chap. 2; act of February 22, 1815, chap. 48; act of April 11, 1818, chap. 43 ; act of February 9, 1821, chap. 10; act of May 20, 1826, chap. 138; act of April 23, 1830, chap. 73; act of May 30, 1830, chap. 215; act of July 13, 1832, clap. 205; act of March 2, 1833 ; act of March 31, 1832, chap. 157; act of July 7, 1838, chap. 116.

(6) Under the reserve contained in the cession act of Virginia, and under the act of Congress of August 10, 1790, and of June 9, 1794, the whole country lying between the Sciota and Little Miami rivers, was subjected to the military warrants, to satisfy which the reserve was made. Doddridge v. Thompson, 9 Wheat. 469; 5 Cond. Rep. 645.

The reservation made by the law of Virginia of 1783, ceding to Congress the territory northwest of the river Ohio, is not a reservation of the whole tract of country between the rivers Sciota and Little Miami. It is a reservation of only so much as may be necessary to make up the deficiency of good lands set apart for the officers and soldiers of the Virginia line on the continental establishment, on the southeast side of the Ohio. The residue of the lands are ceded to the United States, as a common fund for those States who were, or might become members of the Union, to be disposed of for that purpose. Jackson v. Clarke et al., 1 Peters, 635.

Although the military rights constituted the primary claim upon the trust, that claim was according to the intention of the parties so to be satisfied as still to keep in view the interests of the Union, which were also a vital object of the trust. This was only to be effected by prescribing the time in which the lands to be appropriated by those claimants, were to be separated from the general mass, so as to enable the government to apply the residue to the general purposes of the trust. Ibid.

If the right existed in Congress to prescribe time within which military warrants should be located, the right to connect conditions to its extension, follows as a necessary consequence. Ibid.

And whereas the agents for such of the troops of the state of Virginia, Recital, who served on the continental establishment in the army of the United States, during the late war, have reported to the executive of the said state, that there is not a sufficiency of good land on the south-easterly side of the river Ohio, according to the act of cession from the said state to the United States, and within the limits assigned by the laws of the said state, to satisfy the said troops for the bounty lands due to them, in conformity to the said laws: to the intent therefore that the difference between what has already been located for the said troops, on the south-easterly side of the said river, and the aggregate of what is due to the whole of the said troops, may be located on the north-westerly side of the said river, and between the Sciota and Little Miami rivers, as stipulated by the said state: Sec. 2. Be it further enacted, That the secretary of the depart- Secretary at

war to make re. ment of war shall make return to the executive of the state of Virginia

turn to the exe. of the names of such of the officers, non-commissioned officers and cutive of Virgi. privates of the line of the said state, who served in the army of the nia of those en

titled to bounty United States, on the continental establishment, during the late war, lands. and who, in conformity to the laws of the said state, are entitled to bounty lands; and shall also in such return state the aggregate amount in acres due to the said line by the laws aforesaid.

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for Agents to lothe said agents to locate to and for the use of the said troops, between cate certain the rivers Sciota and Little Miami, such a number of acres of good of the troops;

tracts for the use land as shall, together with the number already located between the said two rivers, and the number already located on the south-easterly side of the river Ohio, be equal to the aggregate amount, so to be returned as aforesaid by the secretary of the department of war.

Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the said agents, as soon as and to enter in a may be after the locations, surveys and allotments are made and com- book the bounds

of each location pleied, shall enter in regular order, in a book to be by them provided and survey. for that purpose, the bounds of each location and survey between the said two rivers, annexing the name of the officer, non-commissioned officer or private originally entitled to each; which entries being certified by the said agents or the majority of them, to be true entries, the book containing the same shall be filed in the office of the Secretary of State.

Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the President to President of the United States to cause letters patent to be made out in cause letters such words and form as he shall devise and direct, granting to such per- made out to son so originally entitled to bounty lands, to his use, and to the use of those entitled to his heirs or assigns, or his or their legal representative or representa- bounty lands, tives, his, her or their heirs or assigns, the lands designated in the said entries: Provided always, That before the seal of the United States shall be affixed to such letters patent, the secretary of the department of war shall have indorsed thereon that the grantee therein named, was originally entitled to such bounty lands, and that he has examined the bounds thereof with the book of entries filed in the office of the Secretary of State, and finds the same truly inserted; and every such letters patent shall be countersigned by the Secretary of State, and a minute of the date thereof, and of the name of the grantee shall be entered of record in his office, in a book to be specially provided for the purpose.

Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That it shall be the duty of the Secretary of State, as soon as may be after the letters patent shall

Under the peculiar system of the Virginia land law, as it has been settled in Kentucky, and in the Virginia military district in Ohio, by usages adapted to the circumstances of the country, many principles have been established which are unknown to the common law. A long course of adjudication has fixed those principles, and they are to be considered as the settled rules by which those military titles are to be governed. Galt v. Galloway, 4 Peters, 334.

Secretary of be so completed and entered of record, to transmit the same to the exState to trans. mit the same to

ecutive of the state of Virginia, to be by them delivered to each grantee; the executive of or in case of his death, or that the right of the grantees shall have been Virginia. legally transferred before such delivery, then to his legal representative Act of June 9, 1794, cb. 62.

or representatives, or to one of them. Letters patent Sec. 7. And be it further enacted, That no fees shall be charged obtained with- for such letters patent and record, to the grantees, their heirs or assigns, out fees.

or to his or their legal representative or representatives.

APPROVED, August 10, 1790.

STATUTE II.

$1500 appro

August 10,1790. Chap. XLI.-An Act authorizing the Secretary of the Treasury to finish the

Lighthouse on Portland Head, in the District of Maine.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the priated.

United States of America in Congress assembled, That there be appropriated and paid out of the monies arising from the duties on imports and tonnage, a sum not exceeding fifteen hundred dollars, for the purpose of finishing the lighthouse on Portland Head, in the district of Maine; and that the Secretary of the Treasury, under the directions of the President of the United States, be authorized to cause the said lighthouse to be finished and completed accordingly.

APPROVED, August 10, 1790. STATUTE II.

[ocr errors]

August 11,1790. Chap. XLII.-- An Act to alter the Times for holding the Circuit Courts of the

United States in the Districts of South Carolina and Georgia, and providing (Obsolete.]

that the District Court of Pennsylvania shall in future be held at the city of

Philadelphia only. 1794, ch. 64. Circuit courts

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representawhen and where to be held. tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the

circuit courts of the United States in the districts of South Carolina South Caroli. and Georgia, shall for the future be held as follows, to wit: In the disna 1789, ch. 20, trict of South Carolina on the twenty-fifth day of October next, at

Charleston, and in each succeeding year at Columbia, on the twelfth day Georgia 1789, of May, and in Charleston on the twenty-fifth day of October; in the ch. 20, sec. 5.

district of Georgia on the fifteenth day of October next, at Augusta, and in each succeeding year at Savannah, on the twenty-fifth day of April, and at Augusta on the fifteenth day of October; except when any of those days shall happen to be Sunday, in which case the court shall be held on the Monday following. And all process that was returnable under the former law at Charleston, on the first day of October next, and at Augusta on the seventeenth day of October, shall now be deemed returnable respectively at Charleston on the twenty-fifth day of October next, and at Augusta on the fifteenth day of October next; any thing

in the former law to the contrary notwithstanding. Part of a for. Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That so much of the act, entitled mer act repeal. - "An act to establish the judicial courts of the United States," as directs

that the district court for the district of Pennsylvania shall be held at Pennsylvania Yorktown in the said state, be repealed; and that in future the district 1789, ch. 20,

court for Pennsylvania be held in the city of Philadelphia.

APPROVED, August 11, 1790. STATUTE II.

sec. 3.

August 11,1790. Chap. XLIII.–An Act declaring the assent of Congress to certain acts of the

states of Maryland, Georgia, and Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. 1792, ch. 10.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the [Expired.)

United States of America in Congress assembled, That the consent of
Congress be, and is hereby declared to the operation of the acts of the

« AnteriorContinuar »