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CHAPTER VL

TROM THE INAUGURATION TO THE MEETING OF CONGRESS, JULY 4, 1861.

The Inaugural Address.—Organization of the Government.—The Bombard-

roant of F)rt Sumter.—Passage of Troops through Baltimore.—Interview

with the Mayor of Baltimore.—The Blockade of Rebel Ports.—The Pres-

ident and the Virginia Commissioners.—Instruction to our Ministers

abroad.—Recognition of the Rebels as Belligerents.—Rights of Neu-

trals Page 161

CHAPTER VII.

TIIE EXTRA SESSION OP CONGRESS, AND THE MILITARY EVENTS OP THE SUMMER

OP 1861.

First Annual Message.—Action of Congress.—Slavery and Confiscation.—The

Defeat at Bull Run.—Treatment of the Slavery Question.—General Fre-

mont and the President.—The Trent Affair Page 106

CHAPTER VIII.

THE REGULAR SESSION OP CONGRESS, DECEMBER, 1861.—THE MESSAGE.—

DEBATES, ETO.

Meeting of Congress.—President's Message.—Disposition of Congress.—

Slavery in Territories and District of Columbia.—Proposed Aid to Eman-

cipation by Slave States.—The Debate in Congress.—The President and

General Hunter.—The Border State Representatives.—The Border State

Reply.—The Finances.—The Confiscation Bill.—The President's Action

and Opinions.—The President's Message.—Message in Regard to Mr.

Cameron.—The President and h?s Cabinet.—Close of the Session of Con-

gress.—The President's Letter to Mr. Greeley.—The President and the

Chicago Convention.—Proclamation of Emancipation Page 212

CHAPTER IX.

The Military Administration Of 1862.The President And General

M'olellan.

General McClellan succeeds McDowell.—The President's Order for an Ad-

vance.—The Movement to the Peninsula.—Rebel Evacuation of Manas-

sas.—Arrangements for the Peninsular Movement.—The President's

Letter to General McClellan.—The Rebel Strength at Yorktown.—The

MILITARY EVENTS OF 1863.—THE REBEL DEFEAT AT GETTYSBURG.—FALL
OF VI0K8BURG AND PORT HUDSON.

The Battles at Fredericksburg.—Rebel Raid into Pennsylvania.—Results at

Gettysburg.—Vicksburg and Port Hudson Captured.—Public Rejoicings.

—The President's Speech.—Thanksgiving for Victories.—Battle of Chat-

tanooga.—Thanksgiving Proclamation Page 407

CHAPTER XIV.

POLITICAL MOVEMENTS IN MISSOURI.—THE STATE ELECTIONS OF 1863.

General Fremont in Missouri.—The President's Letter to General Hunter.—

Emancipation in Missouri.—Appointment of General Schofieid.—The

President ard the Missouri Radicals.—The President to the Missouri

Committee.—The President and General Schofieid.—The President and

the Churches.—Letter to Illinois.—The Elections of 1863 Page 422

CHAPTER XV.

THE CONGRESS OF 1863-64.—MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT.—ACTION OF

THE SESSION.—PROGRESS IN RAISING TROOPS.

The President's Message.—The Proclamation of Amnesty.—Explanatory

Proclamation.—Debate on Slavery.—Call for Troops.—General Blair's

Resignation.—Diplomatic Correspondence.—Our Relations with England.

—France and Mexico.—The President and the Monroe Doctrine... Page 445

CHAPTER XVI.

MOVEMENTS TOWARDS RECONSTRUCTION.

State Governments in Louisiana and Arkansas.—Difference of Yiews be-

tween the President and Congress.—The Rebellion and Labor.—The

President on Benevolent Associations.—Advancing Action concerning

the Negro Race.—Free State Constitutions , Page 481

CHAPTER XVII.

MILITARY EVENTS OF THE SPRING AND SUMMER OP 1864.

Battle of the Olustee.—Kilpatrick's Raid on Richmond.—The Red River

Expedition.—The Fort Pillow Massacre.—Rebel Atrocities.—General

Grant's Advance upon Richmond.—Battles in May.—Sherman's March to

Atlanta.—Rebel Raids in Maryland and Kentucky.—Siege of Petersburg.

—Martini Law iu Kentucky.—Draft for Five hundred thousand Men.

Capture of Mobile and Atlanta Page 5x3

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