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the timu of Philip the Second, had been the terror of the Atlantic and the Mediterranean. The arsenale were deserted. The magazines were unprovided. The frontier fortresses were ungarrisoned. The police was utterly inefficient for the protection of the people. Murders were committed in the face of day with perfect impunity. Bravoes and discarded serving-men, with swords at their sidus, swaggered every day through the most public streets and squares of the capital, disturb ing the public peace, and setting at defiance the ministers of justice. The finances were in frightful disorder. The people paid much. The government received little. The American viceroys and the farmers of the revenue became rich, while the merchants broke, while the peasantry starved, while the body-servants of the sovereign remained unpaid, while the soldiers of the oyal guard repaired daily to the doors of convents, and battled there with the crowd of beggars for a porringer of broth and a morsel of bread. Every remedy which was tried aggravated the disease. The currency was altered; and this fiantic measure produced its neverfailing effects. It destroyed all credit, and increased the misery which it was intended to relieve. The Ainerican gold, to use the words of Ortiz, was to the necessities of the state but as a drop of water to the lips of a man raging with thirst, Heaps of unopened despatches accumulated in the offices, while the Ministers were concerting with bedchamber-women and Jesuits the means of tripping up each other. Ever foreign power could plunder and insult with impunity the heir of Charles the Fifth. Into such a state had the mighty kingdom of Spain fallen, while one of its smallest dependencies, a courtry not so large as the province of Estremadura or Andalusia, situated under

an inclement sky, ani preserved only by artificial means from the inrvads of the ocean, had become a power of the first class, and treated on terms of equality with the cuurts of London and Versailles.

The manner in which Lord Mahon cxplains the financial situation of Spain by no means satisfies us. " It will be found," says he,“ that those individuals deriving their chief income from mines, whose yearly produce is uncertain and varying, and seems rather to spring from fortune than to follow industry, are usually careless, unthrifty, and irregular in their expenditure. The example of Spain might tempt us to apply tho same remark to states." Lord Mahon would find it difficult, we suspect, to make out his analogy. Nothing could be more uncertain and varying than the gains and losses of those who were in the habit of putting into the state lotteries. But no part of the public income was more certain than that which was derived from the lotteries. We believe that this case is very similar to that of the American inines. Some veins of ore exceeded expectation ; some fell below it. Some of the private speculators drew blanks, and others gained prizes. But the revenue of the state depended, not on any particular vein, but on the whole annual produce of two great continents. This annual produce seems to have been almost constantly on the increase during the seventeenth century. The Mexican mines were, through the reigns of Philip the Fourth and Charles the Second, in a steady course of improvement; und in South America, though the district: of Potosi was not so productive as formerly, other places more than made up for the deficiency. We very much doubt whether Lord Mahon can prove that the income Which the Spanish government derived from the miner

of America fluctuated more than the income der.vel from the internal taxes of Spain itself.

All the causes of the decay of Spain resolve themselves into one cause, bad government. The valour, the intelligence, the energy which, at the close of the fifteenth and the beginning of the sixteenth century, had made the Spaniards the first nation in the world, were the fruits of the old institutions of Castile and Arragon, institutions eminently favourable to public liberty. Those institutions the first Princes of the House of Austria attacked and almost wholly destroyed. Their successors expiated the crime. The effects of a change from good government to bad government is not fully felt for some time after the change has taken place. The talents and the virtues which a good constitution generates may for a time survive that constitution. Thus the reigns of princes who have established absolute monarchy on the ruins of popular forms of government often shine in history with a peculiar brilliancy. But when a generation or two has passed away, then comes signally to pass that which was written by Montesquieu, that despotic governments resemble those savages who cut down the tree in order to get at the fruit. During the first years

of tyranny, is reaped the harvest sown during the last years of liberty. Thus the Augustan age was rich in great minds formed in the generation of Cicero and Cæsar. The fruits of the policy of Augustus were reserved for posterity. Philip the Second was the heir of the Cortez and of the Justiza Mayor ; and they left hiin a nation which seemed able to conquer all the world. What Philip left to his successors is well known.

The shock which the great religious schism of the sixteenth century gave to Europe, was scarcely felt

in Spain. In England, Germany, Holland, France, Denmark, Switzerland, Sweden, that shock had' pro duced, with some temporary evil, much durable good. The principles of the Reformation had triumphed in some of those countries. The Catholic Church had maintained its ascendency in others.' But though the event had not been the same in all, all. had been 'agi tated' by the conflict. ' Even in France, in Southern Germany, and in the Catholic cantons of Switzerlánd, the public mind had been stirred to its inmost depths. The hold of ancient prejudice had been somewhat loosened. ' The Church of Rome, 'warned by the danger which she had narrowly escaped; had, in those parts of her dominion, assumed a milder and more liberal char: acter. She sometimes condescended to submit her high pretensions to the scrutiny of reason, and availed herself more sparingly than in former times of the aid of the secular arm. Even when persecution was employed, it was not persecution in the worst and most frightful shape. The severities of Lewis the Fourteenth, odious as they were, cannot be compared with those which, at the first dawn of the Reformation, had been inflicted on the heretics in many parts of Europe.

The only effect which the Reformation had produced in Spain had been to make the Inquisition more vigilant and the commonalty thoré bigoted. The times of refreshing came to all' neighbouring countries. One people alone remained, like the fleece of the Hebrew Warrior, dry in the midst of that benignant and fertilising dew.". While other nations were putting away :hildish things, the Spaniard still thought as a child and understood as a child. Among the men of the seventeenth century, he 'was the man of the fifteehth

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century or of a still darker period, delighted to behold an Auto da fe, and ready to volunteer on a Crusadle.

The evils produced by a bad government and a bad religion, seemed to have attained their greatest heigh during the last years of the seventeenth century. While the kingdom was, in this deplorable state, the King, Charles, second of the name, was hastening to an early grave. His days had been few and evil. He had been unfortunate in all his wars, in every part of his internal administration, and in all his domestic relations. His first wife, whom he tenderly loved, died very young. His second wife exercised great influence over him, but seems to have been regarded by him rather with fear than with love. He was childless ; and his constitution was so completely shattered that, at little more than thirty years of age,

he had given up all hopes of posterity. His mind was even more distempered than his body. He was sometimes sunk in listless melancholy, and sometimes harassed by the wildest and most extravagant fancies. He was not, however, wholly destitute of the feelings which became his station. His sufferings were aggravated by the thought that his own dissolution might not improbably be followed by the dissolution of his empire.

Several princes laid claim to the succession. The King's eldest sister had married Lewis the Fourteenth. The Dauphin would, therefore, in the common course of inheritance, have succeeded to the crown. But the Infanta had, at the time of her espousals, solemnly renounced, in ?er own name, and in that of her posterity, all claim to the succession. This renunciatior: had been confirmed in due form by the Cortes. A younger sister of the King had been the first wife of

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