Chaucer

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Harper & Brothers, 1879 - 198 páginas
 

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Página 194 - I know not whether to marvel more, either that he in that misty time could see so clearly, or that we in this clear age walk so stumblingly after him.
Página 67 - Speght, that this piece was composed " at the request of Blanche, Duchess of Lancaster, as a prayer for her private use, being a woman in her religion very devout." If so, it must have been written before the Duchess's death, which occurred in 1369 ; and we may imagine it, if we please, with its twenty-three initial letters blazoned in red and blue and gold on a flyleaf inserted in the Book of the pious Duchess, — herself, in the fervent language of the poem, an illuminated calendar, as being lighted...
Página 24 - Well wimpled up, and on her head a hat As broad as is a buckler or a shield; She had a flowing mantle that concealed Large hips, her heels spurred sharply under that. In company she liked to laugh and chat And knew the remedies for love's mischances, An art in which she knew the oldest dances.
Página 198 - CHAUCER. AN old man in a lodge within a park; The chamber walls depicted all around With portraitures of huntsman, hawk, and hound, And the hurt deer. He listeneth to the lark, Whose song comes with the sunshine through the dark Of painted glass in leaden lattice bound; He listeneth and he laugheth at the sound, Then writeth in a book like any clerk.
Página 157 - Not oftentimes upriseth through the branches The probity of man ; and this He wills Who gives it, so that we may ask of Him.
Página 150 - Yet all these were when no man did them know, Yet have from wisest ages hidden been : And later times things more unknown shall show. Why then should witless man so much misween That nothing is but that which he hath seen? What if within the moon's fair shining sphere, What if in every other star unseen, Of other worlds he happily should hear. He wonder would much more ; yet such to some appear.
Página 76 - Meanwhile in 1374 he was appointed Comptroller of the Customs and Subsidy of Wools, Skins, and Tanned Hides...
Página 170 - Lidgate and Gower, his contemporaries: there is the rude sweetness of a Scotch tune in it, which is natural and pleasing, though not perfect.
Página 19 - On the other hand, it would be unjust to leave unnoticed the passage, at once powerful and touching, in the so-called Parson's Tale (the sermon which closes the Canterbury Tales as Chaucer left them), in -which certain lords are reproached for taking of their bondmen amercements, " which might more reasonably be called extortions than amercements...
Página 106 - That thee is sent receive in buxomness ! The wrestling of this world asketh a fall. Here is no home, here is but wilderness : Forth, pilgrim ! forth, beast ! out of thy stall.

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