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ARTICLE IV.

The two high contracting parties shall have a right, each on its own part, to state to the president of the commission what is the subject matter of the controversy. No difference in these statements, which shall be furnished by way of suggestion, shall arrest the action of the commission.

In case the cause of the dispute should consist of certain acts already committed or about to be committed, the commission shall as soon as possible indicate what measures to preserve the rights of each party ought in its opinion to be taken provisionally and pending the delivery of its report.

ARTICLE V.

As regards the procedure which it is to follow, the commission shall as far as possible be guided by the provisions contained in Articles 9 to 36 of Convention 1 of The Hague of 1907.

The high contracting parties agree to afford the commission all means and all necessary facilities for its investigation and report.

The work of the commission shall be completed within one year from the date on which it has taken jurisdiction of the case, unless the high contracting parties should agree to set a different period.

The conclusion of the commission and the terms of its report shall be adopted by a majority. The report, signed only by the president acting by virtue of his office, shall be transmitted by him to each of the contracting parties.

The high contracting parties reserve full liberty as to the action to be taken on the report of the commission.

ARTICLE VI.

The present treaty shall be ratified by the President of the United States of America, with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, and by the President of the Republic of China.

It shall go into force immediately after the exchange of ratifications and shall last five years.

Unless denounced six months at least before the expiration of the said period of five years, it shall remain in force until the expiration of a period of twelve months after either party shall have notified the other of its intention to terminate it.

In witness whereof the respective plenipotentiaries have signed the present treaty and have affixed thereunto their seals.

Done at Washington this 15th day of September, in the year nineteen hundred and fourteen, corresponding to the 15th day of the ninth month in the third year of the Republic of China.

[Seal.] WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN. [Signature and seal of Chinese Plenipotentiary.] [KAI FU SHAH). (Chinese text not printed.]

TREATY BETWEEN COSTA RICA AND THE UNITED STATES FOR THE

1 ADVANCEMENT OF PEACE

Signed at Washington, February 13, 1914; ratifications exchanged,

November 12, 1914.

The United States of America and the Republic of Costa Rica, being desirous to strengthen the bonds of amity that bind them together and also to advance the cause of general peace, have resolved to enter into a treaty for that purpose, and to that end have appointed as their plenipotentiaries:

The President of the United States, the Honorable William Jennings Bryan, Secretary of State; and

The President of Costa Rica, Señor Don Joaquin Bernardo Calvo, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of Costa Rica to the United States;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, found to be in proper form, have agreed upon and concluded the following articles:

ARTICLE I

The high contracting parties agree that all disputes between them, of every nature whatsoever, to the settlement of which previous arbitration treaties or agreements do not apply in their terms or are not applied in fact, shall, when diplomatic methods of adjustment have failed, be referred for investigation and report to a permanent international commission, to be constituted in the manner prescribed in the next succeeding article; and they agree not to declare war or begin hostilities during such investigation and before the report is submitted.

1 U. S. Treaty Series, No. 603.

ARTICLE II

The international commission shall be.composed of five members, to be appointed as follows: one member shall be chosen from each country, by the government thereof; one member shall be chosen by each government from some third country; the fifth member shall be chosen by common agreement between the two governments, it being understood that he shall not be a citizen of either country. Each of the high contracting parties shall have the right to remove, at any time before investigation begins, any commissioner selected by it and to name his successor, and under the same conditions shall also have the right to withdraw its approval of the fifth commissioner selected jointly; in which case a new commissioner shall be selected jointly as in the original selection. The commissioners shall, when actually employed in the investigation of a dispute, receive such compensation as shall be agreed upon by the high contracting parties. The expenses of the commission shall be paid by the two governments in equal proportion.

The international commission shall be appointed as soon as possible after the exchange of the ratifications of this treaty; and vacancies shall be filled according to the manner of the original appointment.

ARTICLE III

In case the high contracting parties shall have failed to adjust a dispute by diplomatic methods, they shall at once refer it to the International commission for investigation and report. The international commission may, however, spontaneously offer its services to that effect, and in such case it shall notify both governments and request their coöperation in the investigation.

The high contracting parties agree to furnish the permanent international commission with all the means and facilities required for its investigation and report.

The report of the international commission shall be completed within one year after the date on which it shall declare its investigation to have begun, unless the high contracting parties shall limit or extend the time by mutual agreement. The report shall be prepared in triplicate; one copy shall be presented to each government, and the third retained by the commission for its files.

The high contracting parties reserve the right to act independently on the subject matter of the dispute after the report of the commission shall have been submitted.

ARTICLE IV

The present treaty shall be ratified by the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof; and by the President of Costa Rica, with the approval of the Congress thereof; and the ratifications shall be exchanged as soon as possible. It shall take effect immediately after the exchange of ratifications, and shall continue in force for a period of five years; and it shall thereafter remain in force until twelve months after one of the high contracting parties have given notice to the other of an intention to terminate it.

In witness whereof, the respective plenipotentiaries have signed the present treaty and have affixed thereunto their seals.

Done in Washington on the 13th day of February, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fourteen.

[Seal.] WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN. [Seal.) J. B. Calvo.

TREATY BETWEEN DENMARK AND THE UNITED STATES FOR THE

ADVANCEMENT OF PEACE 1

Signed at Washington, April 17, 1914; ratifications exchanged,

January 19, 1915

The United States of America and His Majesty the King of Denmark being desirous to strengthen the bonds of amity that bind them together and also to advance the cause of general peace, have resolved to enter into a treaty for that purpose and to that end have appointed as their plenipotentiaries:

The President of the United States; The Honorable William Jennings Bryan, Secretary of State; and

His Majesty the King of Denmark; Mr. Constantin Brun, His Chamberlain and Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the United States;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full

1 U. S. Treaty Series, No. 608.

powers, found to be in proper form, have agreed upon the following articles:

ARTICLE I The high contracting parties agree that all disputes between them, of every nature whatsoever, which diplomacy shall fail to adjust, shall be submitted for investigation and report to an international commission, to be constituted in the manner prescribed in the next succeeding article; and they agree not to declare war or begin hostilities during such investigation and report.

ARTICLE II The international commission shall be composed of five members, to be appointed as follows: one member shall be chosen from each country, by the government thereof; one member shall be chosen by each government from some third country; the fifth member shall be chosen by common agreement between the two governments. It is understood that the fifth member of the commission shall not be a citizen of either country. The expenses of the commission shall be paid by the two Governments in equal proportion.

The international commission shall be appointed within four months after the exchange of the ratifications of this treaty; and vacancies shall be filled according to the manner of the original appointment.

Unless otherwise agreed between the parties the procedure of the international commission shall be regulated by the prescriptions contained in the convention signed at The Hague on October 18, 1907, for the peaceful settlement of international disputes, Chapter III.

ARTICLE III

In case the high contracting parties shall have failed to adjust a dispute by diplomatic methods, they shall at once refer it to the international commission for investigation and report. The international commission may, however, act upon its own initiative, and in such case it shall notify both governments and request their coöperation in the investigation.

The high contracting parties agree to furnish the permanent international commission with all the means and facilities required for its investigation and report.

The report of the international commission shall be completed within one year after the date on which it shall declare its investigation to have

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