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arriving, shall not be subjected to other or higher duties or charges than those paid on the like articles, the produce or manufacture of any other foreign country. Nor shall any prohibition or restriction be maintained or imposed on the importation of any article, the produce or manufacture of either of the contracting parties into the territories of the other, from whatever place arriving, which shall not equally extend to the importation of the like articles being the produce or manufacture of any other foreign country.

The only exceptions to this general rule shall be in the case of sanitary or other prohibitions occasioned by the necessity of securing the safety of persons, or of cattle, or of plants useful to agriculture and of the measures applicable in either of the two countries to articles enjoying a direct or indirect bounty in the other.

ARTICLE VII

The articles, the produce or manufacture of one of the contracting parties, exported to the territories of the other, shall not be subjected to other or higher charges than those paid for the like articles exported to another foreign country. Nor shall any prohibition be imposed on the exportation of any article from the territories of either of the two contracting parties to the territories of the other which shall not equally extend to the exportation of the like article to any other foreign country.

ARTICLE VIII Merchandise of all kinds, the produce or manufacture of one of the contracting parties, passing in transit through the territories of the other, shall be reciprocally free from all transit duties, whether they pass direct, or whether during transit they are unloaded, warehoused and reloaded. But if the goods remain for more than three days in the bonded warehouses of one of the contracting parties, they shall be liable to the payment of the usual warehousing charges, which shall, in no case, exceed the charges payable by subjects or citizens of the country in which the warehouse is situated. Similarly, subjects or citizens of each of the contracting parties shall enjoy the same treatment in regard to warehousing accommodation as is accorded to national subjects or citizens.

ARTICLE IX

The stipulations of the present treaty, with regard to the mutual accord of the treatment of the most favored nation, apply unconditionally to the treatment of commercial travellers and their samples. The chambers of commerce, as well as such other trade associations and other recognized commercial associations in the contracting states as may be authorized in this behalf, shall be mutually accepted as competent authorities for issuing any certificates that may be required for commercial travellers.

ARTICLE X No internal duties levied for the benefit of the state, local authorities, or corporations which affect, or may affect the production, manufacture, or consumption of any article in the territories of either of the contracting parties shall for any reason be a higher or more burdensome charge on articles the produce or manufacture of the other than on similar articles of native origin.

The produce or manufacture of either of the contracting parties imported into the territories of the other, and intended for warehousing or transit, shall not be subjected to any internal duty, unless they are placed on the market for consumption, the only charge leviable on them being that for warehousing.

ARTICLE XI Each of the contracting parties shall permit the importation or exportation on the vessels of the other of all merchandise which may be legally imported or exported; and such vessels and their cargoes shall enjoy the same privileges and shall not be subjected to any other or higher duties or charges than national vessels and their cargoes.

ARTICLE XII The provisions of this treaty relating to the mutual concession of national treatment in matters of navigation do not apply to the coasting trade, in respect of which the subjects or citizens and vessels of the contracting parties shall enjoy most-favored-nation treatment.

British and Honduranean vessels may, nevertheless, proceed from one port to another, either for the purpose of discharging the whole or part of their cargoes brought from abroad, or of taking on board the whole or part of their cargoes for a foreign destination.

ARTICLE XIII

In all that regards the stationing, loading and unloading of vessels in the ports, docks, roadsteads and harbors of the territories of the contracting parties, no privilege shall be granted to national vessels which shall not be equally granted to vessels of the other country; the intention of the contracting parties being that, in this respect also, their vessels shall be treated on the footing of perfect equality, the two governments, however, reserving the right to grant special privileges to their national vessels when engaged in rendering mail or other government service.

ARTICLE XIV

No duties of tonnage, harbor, pilotage, lighthouse, quarantine, or other analogous duties of whatever nature or under whatever denomination, levied in the name or for the profit of the government, private individuals, corporations, or establishments of any kind, shall be imposed in the ports of the territories of either of the contracting parties upon the vessels of the other country which shall not equally and under the same conditions be imposed in the like cases on national vessels in general. Such equality of treatment shall apply to the respective vessels from whatever port or place they may arrive and whatever may be their destination.

ARTICLE XV

Any vessel of either of the contracting parties which may be compelled, by stress of weather or by accident, to take shelter in a port of the other, shall be at liberty to refit therein, to procure all necessary stores and to put to sea again, without paying any dues other than such as would be payable in a similar case by a national vessel. In case, however, the master of a merchant vessel should be under the necessity of disposing of a part of his merchandise in order to defray his expenses he shall be bound to conform to the regulations and tariffs of the place to which he may have come.

If any vessel of one of the contracting parties should run aground or be wrecked upon the coasts of the other, such vessel and all parts thereof and all furniture and appurtenances belonging thereunto, and all goods and merchandise saved therefrom, including any which may have been cast into the sea, or the proceeds thereof, if sold, as well as all papers found on board such stranded or wrecked vessel shall be given up to the owners or their agents when claimed by them. If there are no such owners or agents on the spot, then the same shall be delivered to the British or Honduranean consular officer in whose district the wreck or stranding may have taken place, upon being claimed by him within the period fixed by the laws of the country, and such consular officers, owners or agents shall pay only the expenses incurred in the preservation of the property, together with the salvage or other expenses which would have been payable in the like case of a wreck of a national vessel.

The contracting parties agree, moreover, that merchandise saved shall not be subjected to the payment of any customs duty unless cleared for internal consumption.

In the case either of a vessel being driven in by stress of weather, run aground, or wrecked, the respective consular officers shall, if the owner or master or other agent of the owner is not present or is present, and requires it, be authorized to interpose in order to afford the necessary assistance to their fellow-countrymen.

ARTICLE XVI

All vessels which, according to British law, are to be deemed British vessels, and all vessels which, according to Honduranean law, are to be deemed Honduranean vessels, shall, for the purposes of this treaty, be deemed British or Honduranean vessels, respectively.

ARTICLE XVII

It shall be free to each of the high contracting parties to appoint consuls-general, consuls, vice-consuls, and consular agents to reside in the towns and ports of the dominions and possessions of the other. Such consuls-general, consuls, vice-consuls, and consular agents however, shall not enter upon their functions until after they shall have been approved and admitted in the usual form by the government to which they are sent. They shall enjoy all the facilities, privileges, exemptions and immunities of every kind which are or shall be granted to consuls of the most favored nation.

ARTICLE XVIII

The consuls and consular agents of each of the contracting parties, residing in the territories of the other, shall receive from the local authorities such assistance as can by law be given to them for the recovery of deserters from the vessels of their respective countries.

Provided that this stipulation shall not apply to subjects or citizens of the state in whose territory the desertion takes place.

ARTICLE XIX

The subjects or citizens of each of the contracting parties shall have, in the territories of the other, the same rights as native subjects or citizens in regard to patents for inventions, trade-marks, and designs, upon the fulfilment of the formalities prescribed by law.

ARTICLE XX

All goods bearing marks or descriptions which state or manifestly suggest that the goods are the produce or manufacture of one of the contracting states shall, if such statement or suggestion be false, be seized on importation into either of the two states. The seizure may also be effected in the state where the false indication of origin has been applied, or in that into which the goods bearing the false indication may have been imported.

The seizure shall be effected either at the request of the proper government department or of an interested party whether an individual or a society in conformity with the domestic legislation of each state, but the authorities are not bound to effect the seizure of goods in transit.

The tribunals of each country shall decide what appellations, on account of their generic character, do not fall within the provisions of the present article.

ARTICLE XXI

Any controversies which may arise respecting the interpretation or the execution of the present treaty or the consequence of any violation thereof, shall be submitted, when the means of settling them directly by amicable agreement are exhausted, to the decision of commissions of arbitration, and the result of such arbitration shall be binding upon both governments.

The members of such commissions shall be selected by the two governments by common consent, failing which, each of the two parties shall nominate an arbitrator, or an equal number of arbitrators, and the arbitrators thus appointed shall select an umpire.

The procedure of the arbitration shall in each case be determined by the two contracting parties, failing which the commission of arbitration shall be itself entitled to determine it beforehand.

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