Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

(Forty-fourth through Forty-sixth Congresses); elected Governor of Georgia in 1882 and served until his death in Atlanta, Ga., March 4, 1883; interment in a vault in Oakland Cemetery; reinterment on his estate, “Liberty Hall,” near Crawford ville, Ga.

SUPREME COURT JUSTICES WHO HAVE SERVED ON THE COMMITTEE ON RESOURCES OR

ITS PREDECESSOR COMMITTEES

BYRNES, JAMES FRANCIS, a Representative and a Senator from South Carolina; born in Charleston, S.C., May 2, 1882; attended the public schools; official court reporter for the second circuit of South Carolina 1900-1908; editor of the Journal and Review, Aiken, S.C., 1903-1907; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1903 and commenced practice in Aiken, S.C.; solicitor for the second circuit of South Carolina 1908-1910; elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-second Congress, reelected to the six succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1911-March 3, 1925); was not a candidate for renomination in 1924, but was an unsuccessful candidate for United States Senator; resumed the practice of law in Spartanburg, S.C.; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate on November 4, 1930; reelected in 1936 and served from March 4, 1931, until his resignation on July 8, 1941, having been appointed to the Supreme Court; chairman, Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expense (Seventy-third through Seventy-seventh Congresses); Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court from July 1941 until his resignation on October 3, 1942, to head the wartime Office of Economic Stabilization until May 1943; director of the Office of War Mobilization, May 1943 until his resignation in April 1945; Secretary of State in the Cabinet of President Harry Truman 1945-1947; resumed the practice of law in Washington, D.C.; Governor of South Carolina 1951-1955; retired and resided in Columbia, S.C., where he died April 9, 1972; interment in Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery.

Vinson, FREDERICK Moore, a Representative from Kentucky; born in Louisa, Lawrence County, Ky., January 22, 1890; attended the public schools; was graduated from the law department of Centre College, Danville, Ky., in 1911; was admitted to the bar the same year and commenced practice in Louisa; city attorney of Louisa in 1914 and 1915; served in the United States Army during the First World War; Commonwealth attorney for the thirty-second judicial district of Kentucky 1921-1924; elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-eighth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of William J. Fields; reelected to the Sixty-ninth and Seventieth Congresses and served from January 12,

Seventy-first Congress, resumed the practice of law in Kentucky; again elected to the Seventy-second and to the three succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1931, to May 12, 1938, when he resigned, having been appointed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt an associate justice of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia and subsequently designated by Chief Justice Stone on March 2, 1942, as chief judge of the United States Emergency Court of Appeals; served in each capacity until his resignation May 27, 1943, to become Director of the Office of Economic Stabilization, in which capacity he served until March 5, 1945; Federal Loan Administrator from March 6 to April 3, 1945; director of War Mobilization and Reconversion from April 4 to July 22, 1945; appointed Secretary of the Treasury by President Harry S. Truman and served from July 23, 1945, to June 23, 1946; appointed and took the oath of office as Chief Justice of the United States on June 24, 1946, and served until his death in Washington, D.C., September 8, 1953; interment in Cemetery, Louisa, Ky.

[ocr errors]

SPEAKERS OF THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES WHO HAVE SERVED ON THE COMMITTEE ON RESOURCES OR

ITS PREDECESSOR COMMITTEES

[graphic]

BANKHEAD, WILLIAM BROCKMAN, (Democrat, Alabama); Moscow, Alabama; (April 12, 1874 - September 15, 1940) (son of John Hollis Bankhead, brother of John Hollis Bankhead 2d, and uncle of Walter Will Bankhead), a Representative from Alabama; born in Moscow, Lamar County, Alabama on April 12, 1874; ; attended the country schools. Graduated from the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa in 1893 and from the Georgetown University Law School at Washington, D.C., in 1895. Admitted to the bar the same year and commenced practice in Huntsville, Alabama; member

of the State house of representatives in William Brockman Bankhead, Photograph courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol.

1900 and 1901; city attorney of Huntsville

1898-1902; moved to Jasper, Walker County, Alabama, in 1905 and continued the practice of law; solicitor of the

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

nomination to the Sixty-fourth Congress in 1914; elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-fifth and to the eleven succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1917, until his death; chairman, Committee on Rules (Seventy-third Congress); majority leader (Seventy-fourth Congress), Speaker of the House of Representatives (Seventy-fourth to Seventy-sixth Congresses); delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1940; died in Washington, D.C., September 15, 1940; funeral services were held in the Hall of the House of Representatives; interment in Oak Hill Cemetery, Jasper, Alabama.

[graphic]

BANKS, NATHANIEL PRENTICE, (Republican, Massachusetts); Waltham, Massachusetts; (January 30, 1816 September 1, 1894) a Representative from Massachusetts; born in Waltham, Massachusetts, January 30, 1816; attended the common schools; a machinist by trade; editor of a weekly paper in Waltham, Mass.; clerk in the customhouse in Boston, Mass.; studied law; was admitted to the Suffolk County bar and commenced practice in Boston; member of the State house of representatives 1849-1852, for two years serving as speaker; member of the State constitutional convention of 1853; elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-third Congress, as the candidate of the American Party to the Thirty-fourth Congress, and as a Republican to the Thirty-fifth Congress and served from Nathaniel P. Banks, Photograph courtesy of March 4, 1853, until he res ned the Architect of the Capitol. December 24, 1857, to become Governor; Speaker of the House of Representatives (Thirty-fourth Congress); Governor of Massachusetts from January 1858, until January 1861; moved to Chicago, Ill.; vice president of the Illinois Central Railroad; entered the Union Army as a major general of Volunteers May 16, 1861; honorably mustered out August 24, 1865; returned to Massachusetts; elected as a Union Republican to the Thirty-ninth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Daniel W. Gooch; reelected as a Republican to the Fortieth, Forty-first, and Forty-second Congresses and served from December 4, 1865, to March 3, 1873; chairman, Committee on Foreign Affairs (Thirty-ninth through Forty-second Congresses); unsuccessful Liberal and Democratic candidate for reelection in 1872 to the Forty-third Congress; member of the State senate in 1874; elected as an Independent to the Forty-fourth Congress and as a Republican to the Forty-fifth Congress (March 4, 1875-March 3, 1879); unsuccessful candidate for marshal on March 11, 1879, and served until April 23, 1888; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-first Congress (March 4, 1889-March 3, 1891); chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Interior (Fifty-first Congress); unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1890 to the Fifty-second Congress; died in Waltham, Middlesex County, Mass., September 1, 1894; interment in Grove Hill Cemetery.

[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

BELL, John, (Whig, Tennessee); Nashville, Tennessee; (February 15, 1797 - September 10, 1869); a Representative and a Senator from Tennessee; born near Nashville, Tenn., February 15, 1797; was graduated from the University of Nashville in 1814; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1816 and commenced practice in Franklin, Tenn.; member, State senate 1817; declined to be a candidate for reelection and moved to Nashville; elected to the Twentieth, and to the six succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1827-March 3, 1841); Speaker of the House of Representatives (Twenty-third Congress);

chairman, Committee on Indian Affairs John Bell. Photograph courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol.

(Twenty-first through Twenty-sixth

Congresses, except for Twenty-third), Committee on Judiciary (Twenty-second and Twenty-third Congresses); appointed by President William Henry Harrison as Secretary of War March 5, 1841, and served until September 12, 1841, when he resigned; member, State house of representatives in 1847; elected as a Whig to the United States Senate in 1847; reelected in 1853, and served from November 22, 1847, to March 3, 1859; unsuccessful candidate in 1860 for President of the United States on the Constitutional Union ticket; investor in ironworks at Cumberland Furnace in Chattanooga, Tenn.; died at his home on the banks of the Cumberland River, near Cumberland Furnace, September 10, 1869; interment in Mount Olivet Cemetery, near Nashville, Tenn.

[graphic]

a

as

BOYD, LINN, (Democrat, Kentucky);
Nashville, Tennessee; (November 22,
1800 - December 17, 1859);
Representative from Kentucky; born in
Nashville, Tenn., November 22, 1800;
pursued preparatory studies; moved with
his parents to New Design, Trigg County,
Ky.; engaged in agricultural pursuits in
Calloway County; member of the State
house of representatives 1827-1832;
returned to Trigg County in 1834; elected

a Jacksonian to the Twenty-fourth
Congress (March 4, 1835-March 3, 1837);
unsuccessful candidate for reelection in
1836 to the Twenty-fifth Congress; elected
as a Democrat to the Twenty-sixth and to
the seven succeeding Congresses (March

Linn Boyd. Photograph courtesy of the

Architect of the Capitol. 4, 1839-March 3, 1855); chairman, Committee on Accounts (Thirtieth Congress), Committee on Territories (Thirty-first Congress); Speaker of the House of Representatives (Thirty-second and Thirty-third Congresses); moved to Paducah, Ky., in 1852; elected Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky in 1859, but when the senate convened was too ill to preside over its deliberations; died in Paducah, Ky., December 17, 1859; interment in Oak Grove Cemetery.

[graphic]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

BYRNS, JOSEPH WELLINGTON, (Democrat, Tennessee); Cedar Hill, Tennessee; (July 20, 1869 - June 4, 1936); (father of Joseph Wellington Byrns, Jr.), a Representative from Tennessee; born near Cedar Hill, Robertson County, Tenn., July 20, 1869; attended the common schools; was graduated from Nashville High School in 1887 and from the law department of Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn., in 1890; was admitted to the bar in 1890 and commenced the practice of law in Nashville; member of the State house of representatives, 1895-1901; member of the State senate in

1901-1903; unsuccessful candidate for Joseph W. Byrns, Photograph district attorney general of Davidson courtesy of the Architect of the County in 1902; elected as a Democrat to Capitol.

Sixty-first and to the

« AnteriorContinuar »