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Vice President of the United States on the Republican ticket headed by Gen. Ulysses Grant in 1868, was inaugurated March 4, 1869, and served until March 3, 1873; unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1872, owing to charges of corruption in connection with the Credit Mobilier of America scandal; lecturer; died in Mankato, Blue Earth County, Minn., January 13, 1885; interment in City Cemetery, South Bend, Ind.

CURTIS, CHARLES, (Republican, Kansas); Topeka, Kansas; (January 25, 1860 - February 8, 1936); a Representative and a Senator from Kansas and a Vice President of the United States; born in Topeka, Kans., January 25, 1860; attended the common schools; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1881 and commenced practice in Topeka; prosecuting attorney of Shawnee County 1885-1889; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-third and to the six succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1893, until January 28, 1907, when he resigned, having been elected Senator; chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Department ofthe Interior (Fifty-fourth through Fifty-seventh Congresses); had been reelected to the Sixtieth Congress, but on January 23, 1907, was elected to the United States Senate as a Republican to fill the vacancy in the term ending March 3, 1907, caused by the resignation of Joseph R. Burton, and on the same day was elected for the full Senate term commencing March 4, 1907, and served from January 29, 1907, to March 3, 1913; unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1912; served as President pro tempore of the Senate during the Sixty-second Congress; chairman, Committee on Indian Depredations (1905-11), Committee on Coast Defenses (1911-13), Republican Conference (1924-1929); again elected to the United States Senate for the term commencing March 4, 1915; reelected in 1920 and 1926 and served from March 4, 1915, until his resignation on March 3, 1929, having been elected Vice President of the United States; Republican whip 1915-1924; majority leader 1925-1929; elected Vice President of the United States on the Republican ticket headed by Herbert Hoover in 1928, was inaugurated on March 4, 1929, and served until March 3, 1933; unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1932 for Vice President; resumed the practice of law in Washington, D.C., where he died on February 8, 1936; interment in Topeka Cemetery, Topeka, Kans.

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JOHNSON, ANDREW, (Democrat, Tennessee); Raleigh, North Carolina;

(December 29, 1808 July 31, 1875);(father-in-law of David Trotter Patterson), a Representative and a Senator from Tennessee and a Vice President and 17th President of the United States; born in Raleigh, N.C., on December 29, 1808; self-educated; at the age

of 13 was apprenticed to tailor; moved to Tennessee in 1826; employed as tailor; alderman of Greene ville, Tenn., 1828-1830;

mayor

of Greeneville 1834-1838; member, State house of representatives 1835-1837, 1839-1841; elected to the State senate in 1841; elected

Democrat to the Twenty-eighth and to the four succeeding

Congresses (March 4, 1843-March 3, 1853); chairman, Committee on Public Expenditures (Thirty-first and Thirty-second Congresses); did not seek renomination, having become a gubernatorial candidate; Governor of Tennessee 1853-1857; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate and served from October 8, 1857, to March 4, 1862, when he resigned; chairman, Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expense (Thirty-sixth Congress); appointed by President Abraham Lincoln Military Governor of Tennessee in 1862; elected Vice President of the United States on the Republican ticket headed by Abraham Lincoln in 1864 and was inaugurated March 4, 1865; became President of the United States April 15, 1865, upon the death of Abraham Lincoln; wide differences arising between the President and the Congress, a resolution for his impeachment passed the House of Representatives February 24, 1868; eleven articles were set out in the resolution and the trial before the Senate lasted three months, at the conclusion of which he was acquitted (May 26, 1868) by a vote of thirty-five for conviction to nineteen for acquittal, the necessary two-thirds vote for impeachment not having been obtained; retired to his home in Tennessee upon the expiration of the presidential term, March 3, 1869; unsuccessful candidate for election to the United States Senate in 1869 and to the House of Representatives in 1872; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1875, until his death near Elizabethton, Carter County, Tenn., July 31, 1875; interment in the Andrew Johnson National Cemetery, Greeneville, Greene County, Tenn.

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KING, WILLIAM RUFUS DE VANE, (Democrat, North Carolina); (April 7, 1786 - April 18, 1853); a Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and a Vice President of the United States; born in Sampson County, N.C., April 7, 1786; attended private schools; graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1803; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1806 and commenced practice in Clinton, N.C.; member, State house of commons 1807-1809; city solicitor of Wilmington, N.C., 1810; elected to the Twelfth, Thirteenth, and Fourteenth Congresses and served from March 4, 1811, until November 4, 1816, when he resigned; secretary of the legation at Naples and later at St. Petersburg; returned to the United States in 1818 and located in Cahaba, Ala.; planter; delegate to the convention which organized the State government; upon the admission of Alabama as a State into the Union in 1819 was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate; reelected as a Republican and as a Jacksonian in 1822, 1828, 1834, and 1841, and served from December 14, 1819, until April 15, 1844, when he resigned; served as President pro tempore of the Senate during the Twenty-fourth through Twenty-seventh Congresses; chairman, Committee on Public Lands (Twenty-second Congress), Committee on Commerce (Twenty-second, Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth Congresses); Minister to France 1844-1846; appointed and subsequently elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Arthur P. Bagby and served from July 1, 1848, until his resignation on December 20, 1852 due to poor health; served as President pro tempore of the Senate during the Thirty-first and Thirty-second Congresses; chairman, Committee on Foreign Relations (Thirty-first Congress), Committee on Pensions (Thirty-first Congress); elected Vice President of the United States on the Democratic ticket with Franklin Pierce in 1852 and took the oath of office March 4, 1853, in Havana, Cuba, where he had gone for his health, which was a privilege extended by special act of Congress; returned to his plantation, ‘King's Bend,' Alabama, and died there April 18, 1853; interment in a vault on his plantation; reinterment in Live Oak Cemetery, Selma, Dallas County, Ala.

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SHERMAN, JAMES SCHOOLCRAFT, (Republican, New York); Utica, New York; (October 24, 1855 - October 30, 1912); a Representative from New York and a Vice President of the United States; born in Utica, N.Y., October 24, 1855; graduated from Hamilton College, Clinton, N.Y., in 1878; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1880 and commenced practice in Utica, N.Y.; president of the Utica Trust & Deposit Co. and of the New Hartford Canning Co.; mayor of Utica 1884; elected as a Republican to the Fiftieth and Fifty-first Congresses (March 4, 1887-March 3, 1891); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1890 to the Fifty-second Congress; elected to the Fifty-third and to the seven succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1893-March 3, 1909); was not a candidate for reelection, having been nominated as the Republican candidate for Vice President on the ticket with William Taft; elected Vice President of the United States in 1908 and served from March 4, 1909, until his death; had been renominated for Vice President in June 1912; died in Utica, Oneida County, N.Y., October 30, 1912; interment in Forest Hill Cemetery. Stevenson, Adlai E.; (D., IL); Christian County, Kentucky; (October 23, 1835 - June 14, 1914); Vice President - 1893-1897; (great-grandfather of Adlai Ewing Stevenson III).

STEVENSON, Adlai EWING, (great-grandfather of Adlai Ewing Stevenson III), a Representative from Illinois and a Vice President of the United States; born in Christian County, Ky., October 23, 1835; moved with his parents to Bloomington, Ill., in 1852; attended Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloomington and Centre College, Danville, Ky., studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1858 and commenced practice in Metamora, Woodford County, Ill.; master in chancery 1860-1864; presidential elector on the Democratic ticket in 1864; district attorney 1865-1868; elected as a Democrat to the Forty-fourth Congress (March 4, 1875-March 3, 1877); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1876 to the Forty-fifth Congress; elected to the Forty-sixth Congress (March 4, 1879-March 3, 1881); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1880 to the Forty-seventh Congress; First Assistant Postmaster General 1885-1889; elected Vice President of the United States on the Democratic ticket headed by Grover Cleveland in 1892; was inaugurated March 4, 1893, and served until March 3, 1897; was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for Vice President of the United States in 1900 and for governor of Illinois in 1908; retired from public and political activities and resided in Bloomington, Ill.; died in Chicago, Ill., June 14, 1914; interment in Bloomington Cemetery, Bloomington, Ill.

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WHEELER, WILLIAM ALMON, (Republican, New York); (June 30, 1819 - June 4, 1887); a Representative from New York and a Vice President of the United States; born in Malone, Franklin County, N.Y., June 30, 1819; completed

Academy at Malone and the University of Vermont at Burlington; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1845 and practiced in Malone, N.Y.; district attorney for Franklin County, N.Y., 1846-1849; member, State assembly 1850-1851; member, State senate 1858-1860; elected as a Republican to the Thirty-seventh Congress (March 4, 1861-March 3, 1863); delegate to the State constitutional conventions in 1867 and 1868; elected to the Forty-first and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1869-March 3, 1877); was not a candidate for reelection, having been nominated in 1876 as the Republican candidate for Vice President; elected Vice President of the United States on the Republican ticket with Rutherford Hayes in 1876; inaugurated in March 1877 and served until March 1881; retired from public life and active business pursuits because of ill health; died in Malone, N.Y., June 4, 1887; interment in Morningside Cemetery.

VICE PRESIDENTS OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES WHO SERVED ON THE COMMITTEE ON RESOURCES OR ITS

PREDECESSOR COMMITTEES

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STEPHENS, ALEXANDER HAMILTON, (Whig | Democrat, Georgia) (great-great-uncle of Robert Grier Stephens, Jr.), a Representative from Georgia; born near Crawfordville, Talia ferro County, Ga., on February 11, 1812; attended private and public schools, was graduated from the University of Georgia at Athens in 1832; taught school eighteen months; studied law; was admitted to the bar in Crawfordville in 1834; member of the State house of representatives 1836-1841; served in the State senate in 1842; elected as a Whig to the Twenty-eighth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Mark A. Cooper; reelected as a Whig to the Twenty-ninth through Thirty-first Congresses, as a Unionist to the Thirty-second Congress, as a Whig to the Thirty-third Congress and as a Democrat to the Thirty-fourth and Thirty-fifth Congresses and served from October 2, 1843, to March 3, 1859; chairman, Committee on Territories (Thirty-fifth Congress); was nota candidate for renomination in 1858; member of the secession convention of Georgia in 1861, which elected him to the Confederate Congress, and was chosen by that Congress as Vice President of the provisional government; elected Vice President of the Confederacy; one of the commissioners representing the Confederacy at the Hampton Roads conference in February 1865; after the Civil War was imprisoned in Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, for five months, until October 1865; elected to the United States Senate in 1866 by the first legislature convened under the new State constitution, but did not present his credentials, as the State had not been readmitted to representation; elected as a Democrat to the Forty-third Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Ambrose R. Wright; reelected to the Forty-fourth and to the three succeeding Congresses and served from December 1, 1873, until his resignation November 4, 1882; chairman, Committee on Coinage, Weights, and Measures

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