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PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES
Who SERVED ON THE PREDECESSOR COMMITTEES OF THE

COMMITTEE ON RESOURCES

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20540 USA

ADAMS, John QUINCY, (Whig, Massachusetts) Served as Chairman of the

Committee on Indian Affairs in the 27th Congress. (July 11, 1767 - February 23, 1848);(son of John Adams and father of Charles Francis Adams), a Senator and a Representative from Massachusetts and 6th President of the United States; born in Braintree, Massachusetts, July 11, 1767; acquired his early education in Europe at the University of Leyden; was graduated from Harvard University in 1787; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Boston, Mass.; appointed Minister to Netherlands 1794, Minister to Portugal

1796, Minister to Prussia 1797, and served until Library of Congress and 1801; commissioned to make a commercial treaty Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

with Sweden in 1798; elected to the Massachusetts

State senate in 1802; unsuccessful candidate for election to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1802; elected as a Federalist to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1803, until June 8, 1808, when he resigned, a successor having been elected six months early after Adams broke with the Federalist party; Minister to Russia 1809-1814; member of the commission which negotiated the Treaty of Ghent in 1814; Minister to England 1815-1817, assisted in concluding the convention of commerce with Great Britain; Secretary of State in the Cabinet of President James Monroe 1817-1825; decision in the 1824 election of the President of the United States fell, according to the Constitution of the United States, upon the House of Representatives, as none of the candidates had secured a majority of the electors chosen by the States, and Adams, who stood second to Andrew Jackson in the electoral vote, was chosen and served from March 4, 1825, to March 3, 1829; elected as a Republican to the U.S. House of Representatives for the Twenty-second and to the eight succeeding Congresses, becoming a Whig in 1834; served from March 4, 1831, until his death; chairman, Committee on Manufactures (Twenty-second through Twenty-sixth, and Twenty-eighth and Twenty-ninth Congresses), Committee on Indian Affairs (Twenty-seventh Congress), Committee on Foreign Affairs (Twenty-seventh Congress); unsuccessful candidate for Governor of Massachusetts in 1834; died in the Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., February 23, 1848; interment in the family burial ground at Quincy, Mass.; subsequently reinterred in United First Parish Church

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20540 USA LC-USZ62-13020

GARFIELD, JAMES ABRAM (Republican, Ohio) Served on the Committee on

Pacific Railroads in the 44th Congress. A Representative from Ohio and 20th President of the United States; born in Orange, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, November 19, 1831; attended district school; at the age of seventeen was driver and helmsman on the Ohio Canal; entered Geauga Seminary, Chester, Ohio, in March 1849, and at the close of the fall term taught a district school; attended the Eclectic Institute, Hiram, Ohio, 1851-1854; was graduated from Williams College, Williamstown, Mass., in 1858; professor of ancient

languages and literature in Hiram College, Hiram, Library of Congress and Ohio; president of Hiram College 1857-1861; Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

member of the State senate in 1859; studied law

and was admitted to the bar in 1860; during the Civil War entered the Union Army; commissioned lieutenant colonel of the Forty-second Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, August 21, 1861, and promoted through the ranks to major general; resigned December 5, 1863; elected as a Republican to the Thirty-eighth and to the eight succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1863, until November 8, 1880, when he resigned, having been elected President of the United States; appointed a member of the Electoral Commission created by act of Congress approved January 29, 1877, to decide the contests in various States in the presidential election of 1876; elected to the United States Senate on January 13, 1880, for the term beginning March 4, 1881, but declined to accept on December 23, 1880, having been elected President of the United States on November 4, 1880, to which office he had been nominated on June 8, 1880, in the Republican National Convention; was inaugurated March 4, 1881; on the morning of July 2, 1881, while passing through the Pennsylvania Railroad Depot in Washington, D.C., was shot by Charles J. Guiteau; died from the effects of the wound, in Elberon, N.J., September 19, 1881; interment in Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio.

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HARRISON, WILLIAM HENRY (Adams / Whig,190
Ohio) Served on the Committee on Public Lands
in the 14th Congress. Charles County, Virginia;
(February 9, 1773 - April 4, 1841); (son of
Benjamin Harrison (1726-1791] father of John
Scott Harrison, brother of Carter Bassett Harrison,
grandfather of Benjamin Harrison, and
great-great-grandfather of William Henry Harrison
(1896-1990), a Delegate from the Territory
Northwest of the River Ohio, a Representative and Library of Congress
a Senator from Ohio, and 9th President of the Photographs Division

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United States; born on ‘Berkeley Plantation,' Charles City County, Va., February 9,1773; pursued classical studies; attended Hampden-Sidney College, Virginia; studied medicine; entered the Army in 1798 as an ensign in the First Infantry, served in the Indian wars, and rose to the rank of lieutenant; resigning from the Army in 1798, was appointed secretary of the Northwest Territory 1798-1799; elected as a Delegate from the Northwest Territory to the Sixth Congress and served from March 4, 1799, to May 14, 1800, when he resigned to become Territorial Governor of Indiana 1801-1813 and also Indian commissioner; defeated the Indians at Tippecanoe in November 1811; major general in the United States Army in the War of 1812; resigned from the Army in 1814; head commissioner to treat with the Indians; elected to the Fourteenth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of John McLean; reelected to the Fifteenth Congress and served from October 8, 1816, to March 3, 1819; member, State senate 1819-1821; elected to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1825, to May 20, 1828, when he resigned to become Minister to Colombia 1828-1829; chairman, Committee on Military Affairs (Nineteenth and Twentieth Congresses); unsuccessful Whig candidate for president in 1836; elected President of the United States and served from March 4, 1841, until his death in Washington, D.C., April 4, 1841; interment in William Henry Harrison Memorial State Park, opposite Congress Green Cemetery, North Bend, Ohio.

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HAYES, RUTHERFORD BIRCHARD, (Republican, Ohio) Served on the Committee

on Private Land Claims in the 39th Congress. Delaware, Ohio; (October 4, 1822 - January 17, 1893); a Representative from Ohio and 19th President of the United States; born in Delaware, Delaware County, Ohio, October 4, 1822; attended the common schools, the Methodist Academy in Norwalk, Ohio, and the Webb Preparatory School in Middletown, Conn.; was graduated from Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, in August 1842 and from the Harvard Law School in January 1845; was admitted to the bar May 10, 1845, and commenced

practice in Lower Sandusky (now Fremont); moved Library of Congress and to Cincinnati in 1849 and resumed the practice of Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

law; city solicitor 1857-1859; commissioned major

of the Twenty-third Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, June 27, 1861; lieutenant colonel October 24, 1861; colonel October 24, 1862; brigadier general of Volunteers October 9, 1864; brevetted major general of Volunteers March 3, 1865; elected as a Republican to the Thirty-ninth and Fortieth Congresses and served from March 4,1865, to July 20, 1867, when he resigned, having been nominated for Governor of Ohio; Governor 1868-1872; unsuccessful candidate for election to the Forty-third Congress; again elected Governor and served from January 1876 to March 2, 1877, when he

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20540 USA

March 5, 1877, and served until March 3, 1881; died in Fremont, Sandusky County, Ohio, January 17,1893; interment in Oakwood Cemetery; following the gift of his home to the State of Ohio for the Spiegel Grove State Park was reinterred there in 1915.

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20540 USA

JOHNSON, ANDREW, (Democrat, Tennessee) Served on the Committee on

Private Land Claims in the 29th and 30th Congresses. Raleigh, North Carolina; (December 29, 1808 - July 31, 1875);(father-in-law of David

of David Trotter Patterson), a Representative and a Senator from Tennessee and a Vice President and 17th President of the United States; born in Raleigh, N.C., on December 29, 1808; self-educated; at the age of 13 was apprenticed to a tailor; moved to Tennessee in 1826; employed as a tailor; alderman of Greeneville, Tenn., 1828-1830; mayor of Greeneville 1834-1838; member, State house of

representatives 1835-1837, 1839-1841; elected to Library of Congress and the State senate in 1841; elected as a Democrat to Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

the Twenty-eighth and to the four succeeding

Congresses (March 4, 1843-March 3, 1853); chairman, Committee on Public Expenditures (Thirty-first and Thirty-second Congresses); did not seek renomination, having become a gubernatorial candidate; Governor of Tennessee 1853-1857; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate and served from October 8, 1857, to March 4, 1862, when he resigned; chairman, Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expense (Thirty-sixth Congress); appointed by President Abraham Lincoln Military Governor of Tennessee in 1862; elected Vice President of the United States on the Republican ticket headed by Abraham Lincoln in 1864 and was inaugurated March 4, 1865; became President of the United States April 15, 1865, upon the death of Abraham Lincoln; wide differences arising between the President and the Congress, a resolution for his impeachment passed the House of Representatives February 24, 1868; eleven articles were set out in the resolution and the trial before the Senate lasted three months, at the conclusion of which he was acquitted (May 26, 1868) by a vote of thirty-five for conviction to nineteen for acquittal, the necessary two-thirds vote for impeachment not having been obtained; retired to his home in Tennessee upon the expiration of the presidential term, March 3, 1869; unsuccessful candidate for election to the United States Senate in 1869 and to the House of Representatives in 1872; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1875, until his death near Elizabethton, Carter County, Tenn., July 31, 1875; interment in the Andrew Johnson National Cemetery, Greeneville, Greene County, Tenn.

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VICE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES
WHO SERVED ON THE COMMITTEE ON RESOURCES OR ITS

PREDECESSOR COMMITTEES

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CHENEY, RICHARD BRUCE, (Republican, Wyoming); Lincoln, Nebraska; (January 30, 1941 -); a Representative from Wyoming and a Vice President; born in Lincoln, Lancaster County, Nebr., January 30, 1941; attended public schools in Lincoln and Casper, Wyo.; attended Yale University, 1959-1960; Casper College, Casper, Wyo., 1963; B.A., University of Wyoming, Laramie, 1965; M.A., University of Wyoming, 1966; Ph.D. candidate, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis., 1968; congressional fellow, 1968-1969; special assistant to the Director of OEO, 1969-1970; White House staff assistant, 1971; assistant director, Cost of Living Council, 1971-1973; vice president, Bradley, Woods & Co., 1973-1974; Deputy Assistant to the President, 1974-1975; White House Chief of Staff, 1975-1977; elected as a Republican to the Ninety-sixth and to the five succeeding Congresses and served from January 3, 1979, until his resignation on March 17, 1989, to accept appointment by President George Bush as secretary of defense; minority whip (One Hundred First Congress); Secretary of Defense, 1989-1993; senior fellow, American Enterprise Institute, 1993-1995; chairman and chief executive office of the Halliburton Company, 1993-2000; vice president of the United States, 2001-.

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COLFAX, SCHUYLER, (Republican, Indiana); New York City, New York; (March

23, 1823 - January 13, 1855); Representative from Indiana and a Vice President of the United States; born in New York City March 23, 1823; attended the common schools; in 1836 moved with his parents to New Carlisle, Ind.; appointed deputy auditor of Joseph County 1841; became legislative correspondent for the Indiana State Journal; purchased an interest in the South Bend Free Press and changed its name in 1845 to the St. Joseph Valley Register, the Whig organ of northern Indiana; member of the State constitutional convention in 1850; unsuccessful Whig candidate for election to the Thirty-second Congress; elected

Republican to the Thirty-fourth and to the six succee ding Congresses (March 4, 1855-March 3, 1869); was not a candidate for renomination in 1868, having become the Republican nominee for Vice President; Speaker of the House of

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