The Atlantis: a register of literature and science, Volúmenes3-4

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Página 438 - s by action dignified. Within the infant rind of this small flower Poison hath residence, and medicine power:. For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each part, Being tasted, slays all senses with the heart. Two such opposed kings encamp them still In man as well as herbs, grace and rude will ; And where the worser is predominant, Full soon the canker death eats up that plant.
Página 4 - This principle is the great spring of the activity of our minds, and their chief feeder. From this principle the direction of the sexual appetite, and all the passions connected with it, take their origin : it is the life of our ordinary conversation; and upon the accuracy with which similitude in dissimilitude, and...
Página 4 - And who is He ? the vast, the awful form, Girt with the whirlwind, sandal'd with the storm A western cloud around His limbs is spread, His crown a rainbow, and a sun His head. To highest Heaven He lifts his kingly hand, And treads at once the ocean and the land ; And, hark ! His voice amid the thunder's roar, His dreadful voice, that time shall be no more...
Página 32 - A true natural aristocracy is not a separate interest in the state, or separable from it. It is an essential integrant part of any large body rightly constituted. It is formed out of a class of legitimate presumptions, which, taken as generalities, must be admitted for actual truths. To be bred in a place of estimation ; To see nothing low and sordid from one's infancy; To be taught to respect one's self; To be habituated to the censorial inspection of the public eye ; To look early to public opinion...
Página 475 - And portance in my travel's history; Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven, It was my hint to speak, — such was the process: And of the Cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
Página 438 - The chariest maid is prodigal enough, If she unmask her beauty to the moon : Virtue itself 'scapes not calumnious strokes : The canker galls the infants of the spring Too oft before their buttons be disclosed, And in the morn and liquid dew of youth Contagious blastments are most imminent.
Página 28 - Why formed no weaker, blinder, and no less; Ask of thy mother earth, why oaks are made Taller or stronger than the weeds they shade? Or ask of yonder argent fields above, Why Jove's satellites are less than Jove?
Página 32 - ... to be led to a guarded and regulated conduct from a sense that you are considered as an instructor of your fellow-citizens in their highest concerns, and that you act as a reconciler between God and man; to be employed as an administrator of law and justice, and to be thereby amongst the first benefactors to mankind...
Página x - ... any supposition, even a false one, to see what consequences will follow from it ; and by observing how these differ from the real phenomena, we learn what corrections to make in our assumption. The simplest supposition which accords with the more obvious facts, is the best to begin with ; because its consequences are the most easily traced. This rude hypothesis is then rudely corrected, and the operation repeated ; and the comparison of the consequences deducible from the corrected hypothesis,...

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