The Philosophy of Rhetoric

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Harper & Brothers, 1849 - 455 páginas
 

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Mentioned as exemplary in David Irving’s Elements of English Composition, George Campbell’s Philosophy of Rhetoric provides training in thinking and presentation, and in that way contributes to English Composition. This “New edition” republishes the previous three volume work as one book.
Book 1, Nature and Foundations of Eloquence, provides a balanced understanding of such elements as wit, humor, and ridicule along with an understanding of some logical and reasoning devices to keep the speaker on the good side of such. Book 2, Foundations and Essential Properties of Elocution, provides several “canons” of “verbal criticism.” Included are limitations such as Campbell notes “Good use is not always uniform in her decisions,” along with the times and places for improprieties and barbarisms. If Book 2 was a discussion on cultivating wisdom with words, Book 3, Discriminating Properties of Elocution, is further coaching in wisdom. A line from a popular song of recent years sums up the general sentiment, “You got to know when to . . .”
Campbell, George. Philosophy of Rhetoric. New edition. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1849. http://books.google.com/books?id=xssQAAAAYAAJ.
 

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Contenido

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Página 48 - He reads much; He is a great observer and he looks Quite through the deeds of men: he loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music; Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort As if he mock'd himself and scorn'd his spirit That could be moved to smile at any thing.
Página 407 - Cromwell, Cromwell, Had I but served my God with half the zeal I served my king, he would not in mine age Have left me naked to mine enemies.
Página 251 - For there stood by me this night the angel of God, whose I am, and whom I serve, saying, Fear not, Paul ; thou must be brought before Caesar : and, lo, God hath given thee all them that sail with thee.
Página 309 - For, lo, the winter is past, The rain is over and gone; The flowers appear on the earth; The time of the singing of birds is come, And the voice of the turtle is heard in our land; The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, And the vines with the tender grape give a good smell, Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.
Página 363 - Therefore whosoever heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them, I will liken him unto a wise man, which built his house upon a rock : and the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house ; and it fell not : for it was founded upon a rock.
Página 334 - The sound must seem an echo to the sense : Soft is the strain when Zephyr gently blows, And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows ; But when loud surges lash the sounding shore, The hoarse, rough verse should like the torrent roar : When Ajax strives some rock's vast weight to throw, The line too labours, and the words move slow ; Not so, when swift Camilla scours the plain, Flies o'er th' unbending corn, and skims along the main.
Página 14 - H' had hard words ready to show why, And tell what rules he did it by ; Else, when with greatest art he spoke, You'd think he talked like other folk.
Página 379 - The enemy said, I will pursue, I will overtake, I will divide the spoil ; my lust shall be satisfied upon them ; I will draw my sword, my hand shall destroy them.
Página 289 - Every one knew how laborious the usual method is of attaining to arts and sciences ; whereas by his contrivance, the most ignorant person, at a reasonable charge, and with a little bodily labour, may write books in philosophy, poetry, politics, law, mathematics, and theology, without the least assistance from genius or study.
Página 57 - Men suffer all their life long under the foolish superstition that they can be cheated. But it is as impossible for a man to be cheated by any one but himself, as for a thing to be and not to be at the same time.

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