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it my duty to recommend to Congress an Appropriation for the latter. I considered the withholding it at the last Session as the expression only of a doubt, by Congress, of the propriety of the Position, and not as a definitive opinion. Supposing that that question would be decided at the present Session, I caused the Position, and such parts of the Coast as are particularly connected with it, to be re-examined, that all the light on which the decision, as to the Appropriation, could depend, might be fully before you.

In the first Survey, the Report of which was that on which the Works, intended for the defence of New Orleans, the Mississippi, the Bay of Mobile, and all the Country dependant on those waters, were sanctioned by the Executive; the Commissioners were industriously engaged about 6 months. I should have communicated that very able and interesting Document then, but from a doubt how far the interest of our Country would justify its publication, a circumstance which I now mention, that the attention of Congress may be drawn to it.

JAMES MONROE. Washington, 26th March, 1822.

PROCLAMATION of the President of The United States,

declaring the Ports of The United States to be open to Vessels from certain British Islands and Colonies.

24th August, 1822.

By the President of the United States of America.

A PROCLAMATION. WHEREAS, by an Act of the Congress of The United States, passed on the 6th day of May last, it was provided, that, on satisfactory evidence being given to the President of The United States, that the Ports in the Islands or Colonies of the West Indies under the dominion of Great Britain have been opened to the Vessels of 'The United States, the President should be, and thereby was, authorized to issue his Proclamation, declaring that the Ports of The United States should thereafter be open to Vessels of Great Britain, employed in the trade and intercourse between The United States and snch Islands or Colonies, subject to such reciprocal rules and restrictions as the President of The United States might, by such Proclamation, make and publish, any thing in the Laws entitled, an Act concerning Navigation, or an Act entitled “ An Act supplementary to an Act concerning Navigation," to the contrary notwithstanding.

And, whereas, satisfactory evidence has been given to the President of The United States, that the Ports hereinafter damed, in the Islands

......

...............

or Colonies in the West Indies, under the Dominion of Great Britain, have been opened to the Vessels of The United States; that is to say, the Ports of Kingston, Savannah Le Mar, Montego Bay,

Santa Lucia, Antonio, St. Ann, Falmouth, Sin Jamaica.

Maria, Morant Bay........... Saint George,

Grenada. Rosseau,

... Dominica. Saint John's,.........

... Antigua. San Josef,...

Trinidad. Scarborough,

Tobago. Road Harbour,......

Tortola. Nassau,

New Providence. Pittstown,...............

Crooked Island. Kingston, ....

St. Vincents. Port George and Port Hamilton............... Bermuda. Any Port where there is a Custom House,.......... Bahamas. Bridgetown,

Barbadoes. St. John's, St. Andrew's,.

New Brunswick. Halifax,.......

Nova Scotia. Quebec,.....

Canada. St. John's...

Newfoundland. Georgetown,......

Demarara. New Amsterdam,........

Berbice. Castries,.......

St. Lucia. Basseterre,

St. Kitts. Charlestown,....

Nevis. Plymouth,

Montserrat. Now, therefore I, James Monroe, President of the United States of America, do hereby declare and proclaim, that the Ports of The United States shall hereafter, and until the end of the next Session of the Congress of The United States, be open to the Vessels of Great Britain, employed in the trade and intercourse between The United States and the Islands and Colonies hereinbefore named; any thing in the Jaws, entitled “An Act concerning Navigation,” or an Act, entitled “An Act supplementary to an Act concerning Navigation,” to the contrary notwithstanding, under the following reciprocal rules and restrictions, namely:-

To Vessels of Great Britain, bona fide British-built, owned, and the Master and three-fourths of the Mariners of which, at least, shall belong to Great Britain; or any United States' built Ship or Vessel which has been sold to, and become the property of, British Subjects; such Ship or Vessels being also navigated with a Master and threefourths of the Mariners, at least, belonging to Great Britain : And, provided, always, That no Articles shall be imported into the United States in any such British Ship or Vessel, other than Articles of the growth, produce, or manufacture, of the British Islands and Colonies in the West Indies, when imported in British Vessels coming from any such Island or Colony, and Articles of the growth, produce or manufacture, of the British Colonies in North America, or of the Island of Newfoundland, in Vessels coming from the Port of St. John's, in that Island, or from any of the aforesaid Ports of the British Colonies in North America.

Given under my band, at the City of Washington, this 24th day of August, in the Year of our Lord 1822, and in the 47th Year of the Independence of The United States.

JAMES MONROE. By order of the President:

John Quincy Adams, Secretary of State.

CIRCULAR of the Government of The United States to the

Collectors of the Customs, explanatory of the President's
Proclamation of the 24th August 1822, respecting the Trade
with certain British Islands and Colonies.
Treasury Department, Comptroller's Office

, (Extract.)

Washington, 14th September, 1822. You will receive, herewith, a Copy of the Proclamation of the President of The United States, of the 24th ultimo, issued in conformits with the authority vested in him by an Act of Congress passed on the 6th of May last, entitled "An act in addition to the Act concerning Navigation, and also to authorise the appointment of Deputy Collectors.”

The Proclamation specifies the British Colonial Ports in the West Indies, and in North America, which have, by an Act of Parliament, of the 24th of June last, been opened to the Vessels of The United States;- and from which British Vessels, possessing certain qualifications, may be admitted to entry in the Ports of The United States until the end of the next Session of Congress.

According to the terms of the Proclamation, no Articles can be imported into The United States, in any such British Ship or Vessel, other than articles of the growth, produce, or manufacture, of the British Islands and Colonies in the West Indies, in the case of British Vessels coming from any such Island or Colony in the West Indies and articles of the growth, produce, or manufacture, of the British Colonies in North America, or of the Island of Newfoundland, in the case of such Vessels coming from the Port of St. John's, in that Island, or any of the Ports in North America specified in the Proclamation.

This is a corresponding regulation with that contained in the third Article of the Act of Parliament alluded to, in these words :- :-“ Provided always, that no articles enumerated in the said Schedule shall be imported in any Foreign Ship or Vessel, or in any British-built Ship or Vessel so sold as aforesaid, unless shipped and brought directly from the Country or Place of which they are the growth, produce, or manufacture,

It results that British Vessels coming from British Colonial Ports in North America cannot bring articles of the growth, produce, or manufacture, of the British West India Islands, or the productions of any other Place or Country; and when coming from the British Colonial Ports in the West Indies, cannot bring articles of the growth, produce, or manufacture, of the British Colonial Ports in North America, or the productions of any other Place or Country.

It is not to be understood, however, that the Proclamation limits the importation in British Vessels, to the growth, produce, or manufacture, of the particular Port or Island from which the Vessel may come: on the contrary, a British Vessel coming from any British Colonial Port in the West Indies, may bring articles of the growth, produce, or manufacture, not only of such particular Port, but also of any other of the British Colonial Ports in the West Indies; and a British Vessel coming from a British Port in North America, may bring articles of the growth, produce, or manufacture, not only of such particular Port, but also of any other of the North American British Colonies.

It may be proper to observe, th at Vessels of The United States are neither affected by the Act of Congress, of the 6th of May last, before referred to, nor by the Proclamation of the President of The United States; but are still subject to the operation of the 3d Section of the Navigation Act of the 15th of May, 1820; according to which, they cannot import from British Colonial Ports in North America, the productions of the British Colonial Ports in the West Indies, or those of any other Place or Country; nor from the British Colonial Ports in the West Indies, the production of the British Colonial Ports in North America, or those of any other Place or Country; with the same privilege, however, as has already been stated, with respect to importations in British Vessels; that is to say, that the importations in American Vessels are not to be limited to the articles of the growth, produce, or manufacture, of the particular Port from which the Vessel may come; but the same latitude is to be enjoyed in this respect as in the case of British Vessels.

As the Act of Congress and the President's Proclamation extend no farther than to the opening of the Ports of The United States, on certain conditions and restrictions, to British Vessels arriving from certain British Colonial Ports, such Vessels and their Cargoes are not entitled to the privileges of the Convention between The United States and Great Britain, of the 3d of July, 1815; but British Vessels arriving from such Colonial Ports, are liable to 1 dollar per ton for tonnage duties and light money, and their Cargoes to the usual discriminating duty of 10 per cent between importations of goods in Vessels of The United States, and Foreign Vessels not privileged by Treaty stipulations.

Although the Proclamation has no special reference to exportations from The United States, of the productions thereof, in British Vessels, yet from the spirit and intention of the regulation contemplated by it, I am of opinion that the Ports of The United States are to be considered so opened to British Vessels, as to render the provisions of the Act concerning Navigation, of the 18th of April, 1818, and of the Act supplementary thereto, of the 15th of May, 1820, entirely inoperative, as well with respect to exportations as to importations.

You will, therefore, consider British Vessels, having the qualifications mentioned in the Proclamation, as being privileged to export the productions of The United States to any of the British Colonial Ports or Places specified in it, and grant Clearances accordingly. The Collectors, Naval Officers, and Surveyors, of

The United States.

REPORT of the Secretary of War, relative to the Erpenses

of the Army and Militia. 1818 to 1822.- 1st March, 1892.

The Secretary of War to the Speaker of the House of Representatives. SIR,

Department of War, 1st March, 1822. Pursuant to a Resolution of the House of Representatives of the 7th ultimo, I have now the honour of submitting “a comparative view of the Expenses of the Army proper, and Military Academy, for the Years 1818, 1819, 1820, and 1821, and Estimates for 1822, arranged under the various heads of Expenditures according to the present and former organization of the Department of War.” The Military disbursements for the Years 1816 and 1817, as explained by the Letter from the Second Auditor, accompanying this Report, are so blended with the arrearages of prior Years, pay and subsistence of the Militia, and Claims of certain States and Individuals, arising out of the late War, as to preclude the possibility of ascertaining the Expenses of the Army for those Years, and so as to put it out of my power to embrace them in the comparative view called for; though it is believed, if it could be embraced in the comparison, the result would not vary materially from that founded on the Expenditure of the Year 1818, in which Year a separation was made, for the first time, between the cur

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