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TAXES OF EACH COUNTY IN CALIFORNIA. STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNT OF TAXES CHARGEABLE TO EACH COUNTY, AND THE PAYMENTS

MADE ON THE SAME, FOR THE YEAR 1851-52.

State taxes
chargeable to Auction

Delinquent each county at and gaming Total taxes Payments made list of Names of counties, 65c, on $100. tax reported. due State. by each county, each county. Butte..... $7,175 50

$7,175 50 $3,084 85 $3,683 15 Colusi.. 2,591 79

2,591 79 Contra Costa.. 11,629 71

11,629 71 9,690 04 1,514 89 Calaveras...

no returns. El Dorado.... 7,156 86 2,711 96 9,868 82

5,841 84 Los Angelos..

15,558 89 38 05 15,576 94 10,593 32 3,086 75 224 40

224 40 Marin ... 5,110 43

5,110 43 4,402 03 557 25 Mariposa 2,098 08

2,098 08 Monterey

11,552 05 407 76 11,690 81 9,135 23 1,801 79 Napa 5,604 41

6,604 41 4,790 70 2,454 47 Nevada 8,439 52

8,439 52 6,626 00 Placer

3,123 24 1,481 29 4,604 56 3,518 66 766 57 San Francisco

118,572 06 28,199 00 146,771 06 103,460 80 Sacramento.

41,151 65 14,770 69 55,922 94 30,694 59 San Joaquin

12,240 72 2,849 96 15,135 68 11,224 68 3,326 55 Santa Clara...

10,597 60 San Luis Obispo... 3,163 44

3,163 44 Santa Barbara.. 6,456 32

5,456 32 3,621 26 San Diego.. 5,387 26

5,387 26 1,296 00 Solano 8,960 40

8,960 40 4,000 00 Sonoma 11,525 23

11,525 23 Sutter 5,865 25

6,865 25 1,000 00 Shasta

4,931 12 1,803 40 3,734 52 3,338 43 Tuolumne 8,086 65

8,086 65 Trinity:

do returns. Santa Cruz 8,200 31

8,200 31 7,085 36 743 61 Yolo.. 4,619 73

4,619 73 2,701 60 Yuba .

14,713 67 1,462 70 16,175 37 7,676 94

Total

333,138 97

53,770 81 385,909 60 245,359 97 15,934 01

1854.......

DEBT AND FINANCES OF ST. LOUIS. The total debt of the city amounts to $1,536,096 10. A considerable portion of this has been incurred for river and harbor and for various city improvements, and has been judiciously expended. The above sum includes $75,000 of stock issued to the Pacific Railroad. I be following is from the Controller's Report :THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT SHOWS THE AMOUNT OF DEBT FALLING DUE IN EACH YEAR. In 1852 .... $105,000 In 1865 ...

$95,500 1853... 43,600 1866.

70,000 5,000 1867.

50,000 1855... 43,000 1868.

100,000 28,700 1870..

200,000 1857. 10,000 1871..

357,000 1858. 33,000 1872.

23,000 1859. 34,000 1876.

70,000 1860. 22,000 1890.

25,000 1862. 90,000 1895..

50,000 1863.

4,000 $1,400 at various dates from 1853 to 1861. 1864.

75,010 For the payment of harbor bonds, (117,000,) and the common sewer bonds, (42,000,) with the interest on the same, there is a fund provided by special tax.

The total amount of receipts into the Treasury for the past year were $714,195 80. Of this sum, $348,276 81 were received from merchant and harbor taxes, $273,443 27

1856....

Banks,

Per cent.

4

from loans, and the balance from various sources of permanent revenue, making the aggregate income, independent of loans, $440,752 63. The expenditures for the same period were $470,791 44. Of this sum over $100,000 have been expended for works of permanent improvement, such as the new Water Works, City Hall, Market House, etc., which will yield a handsome revenue when completed.

The city will soon incur further contingent liabilities to the amount of about $1,000,000, being the aggregate of the loans voted to the Pacific Railroad, which is now in progress from St. Louis to the west line of the State, and to the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad, from Cincinnati to the former city. Both of these works will be of great utility to the city; vastly more so than the amount of aid to be extended to them. But as there is good reason to believe that both projects will prove good investments, the stock taken in them by the city will not, in reality, be any additional burden upon its finances.

CAPITAL AND DIVIDENDS OF BOSTON BANKS, APRIL, 1852. The following table shows the capital of the several banks in Boston, and the semiannual dividends declared and payable in that city on the 5th of April, 1862:

Dividend. Total
Capital.

Dividend, Atlantic...,

$500,000

$20,000 Atlas...

500,000 3} 17,500 Blackstone, for 54 months.

250,000 3

7,500 Boston...

900,000 4

36,000 Boylston..

250,000 4

11,250 Bank of Commerce.

1,500,000

60,000 City...

1,000,000 87 85,000 Cochituate i..

150,000

6,000 Columbian..

500,000

31 17,500 Eagle ..

500,000

17,500 Exchange...

1,000,000

40,000 Freeman's.

250,000 45 11,250 Faneuil Hall, for 7 months.

500,000

15,000 Globe

1,000,000 4 40,000 Granite...

650,000 4

26,000 Grocers'

300,000 4

12,000 Hamilton...

500,000 4

20,000 Market

560,000 5

28,000 Massachusetts

800,000 3

24,000 Mechanics', S. B.

150,000 4

6,000 Merchants'

3,000,000 4 120,000 New England.

1,000,000

40,000 North

750,000

31

26,000 North America

500,000

20,000 Shawmut....

500,000 4

20,000 Shoe and Leather Dealers'.

1,000,000

40,000 State...

1,800,000 31 63,000 Suffolk

1,000,000 Tremont

1,000,000

40,000 Traders'

600,000

24,000 Union....

1,000,000

40,000 Washington..

500,000 31 17,500

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Total......

$24,410,000 By reference to a similar table, published in the Merchants' Magazine for November, 1851, (vol. xxv., page 314,) it appears that the amount of bank capital in October, 1851, was $23,660,000. The amount as above is $24,410,000, showing an increase of banking capital in Boston of $750,000, since October 1851. The Cochituate Bank pay on $150,000 on old capital—have increased $50,000 more since last dividend. The Faneuil Hall Bank went into operation September 1, 1851, on $250,000 paid in. Second assessment paid in October 1, 1851, $250,000. The above include all the dividends with the exception of the Suffolk Bank, which has not as yet been able to make up its aceounts

1831...

FINANCIAL STATISTICS OF LOUISIANA. Louis Bourdelon, Auditor of the State of Louisiana, in compliance with a resolution of the Senate, reports the amount of liabilities of the State in each of the years 1880, 1835, 1840, 1845, and 1850—also the amount of the annual receipts and expenditures from 1830 to 1852, as follows:STATEMENT SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF THE ANNUAL RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES, FOR

THE YEARS 1830 to 1852.
Receipts.
Expenses.

Balance. 1830....

507,291 71
340,056 38

167,235 33
503,168 67
364,848 40

138,320 27 1832.

467,353 66
372,343 38

95,010 28 1833.

482,377 99
894,659 30

87,718 69 1834,

582,254 82
500,867 15

81,387 67 1835.

456,099 34
396,394 70

59,704 64 1836.

564,825 36
501,530 37

63,294 99 1837.

852,316 75
358,984 91

493,331 84 1838.

1,047,802 44
986,032 32

61,770 12 1839.

899,604 20
814,121 63

85,482 57 1840.

778,224 24
642,000 02

136,224 22 1841.

758.599 83
700,822 78

57,777 05 1842.

588,716 65
501,591 23

87,125 42 1843.

648,599 64
560,961 54

94,237 21 1844.

972,177 61
616,684 98

355,492 63 3,662,889 72 3,510,818 39

352,071 33 1846.

1,245,715 94

995,813 28

391,785 61 1847.

1,418,856 63

675,082 96

293,115 69 1848.

1,351,265 17

872,702 50

478,562 67 1849,

628,965 91
829,758 99

299,206 92 1850, 1,016,040 66 990,859 39

325,426 47 1851.

1,161,673 91

852,787 64 308,886 37 STATEMENT SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF THE LIABILITIES OF THE STATE, OF EVERY DE

SCRIPTION, AT THE SEVERAL PERIODS NAMED, SAY FROM 1830 to 1850. Debts proper of the State in 1830

$153,200 88 Liabilities on bonds issued, as follows : To Bank of Louisiana ...

$2,400,000 To Heirs of Thomas Jefferson

10,000 Consolidated Bank...

2,500,000 Debts proper of the State in 1835.

583,138 99 Liability on Bonds as follows:To Charity Hospital.....

125,000 To Union Bank....

7,000,000 To Mechanics' and Traders' Bank.

150,000

1845..

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$630,240

Debts proper of the State in 1850..

1,918,397 67

THE LIABILITY OF THE STATE, OF EVERY DESCRIPTION, ON THE Ist OF JANUARY, 1850. Bonds to Union Bank ..

$2,668,000 Bonds to Consolidated Bank.

1,376,000 Bonds to Citizens' Bank.

6,468.000 For interest.

577,888 -7,015,887 Second Municipality..

399,364 Third Municipality

30,240 Total...

$11,519,492

UNITED STATES TREASURER'S STATEMENT, MARCH 22, 1852. TREASURER'S STATEMENT, SHOWING THE AMOUNT AT HIS CREDIT IN THE TREASURY, WITH

ASSISTANT TREASURERS AND DESIGNATED DEPOSITARIES, AND IN THE MINT AND BRANCHES, BY RETURNS RECEIVED TO MONDAY, MARCH 22, 1852, THE AMOUNT FOR WHICH DRAFTS HAVE BEEN ISSUED BUT WERE THEX UNPAID, AND THE AMOUNT THEN REMAINING SUBJECT TO DRAFT. SHOWING, ALSO, THE AMOUNT OF FUTURE TRANSFERS TO AND FROM DEPOSITALIES, AS ORDERED BY THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY. ·

Drafts

heretofore drawn Amount on but not paid, Amount

deposit. though payable. subj. lo drast. Treasury of United States, Washington... $114,928 70 $1,806 72 $113,12! 98 Assistant Treasurer, Boston, Mass..

434,429 20 13,263 55 421,165 65 Assistant Treasurer, New York, N. Y. 2,147,323 51 237,813 68 1,909,509 83 Assistant Treasurer, Philadelphia, Pa.. 958,434 31 75,866 00 882,568 81 Assistant Treasurer, Charleston, S. C.... 92,973 66 17,595 58 75,377 98 Assistant Treasurer, New Orleans, La. 680,744 58 657,887 85 122,856 73 Assistant Treasurer, St. Louis, Mo...... 610,704 11 107,469 40 503,234 71 Depositary at Butfalo, New York.... 104.074 18 7,220 35 96,853 83 Depositary at Baltimore, Maryland..

48,681 68 5,447 53 43,234 15 Depositary at Richmond, Virginia.....

17,327 14 200 33 17,126 81 Depositary at Norfolk, Virginia....

40,152 97 2,866 66 37,286 31 Depositary at Wilmington, North Carolina. 6,087 95 2,419 39 3,668 56 Depositary at Savannah, Georgia...

79,454 47 12,902 38 66,552 09 Depositary at Mobile, Alabama..

43,995 99 34,693 69 8,402 30 Depositary at Nashville, Tennessee

49,776 24 44,011 58 5,764 66 Depositary at Cincinnati, Ohio....

20,986 87 1,253 41 19,753 46 Depositary at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.

476 56

476 56 Depositary at Cincinnati, (late)...

3,301 37

3,301 37 Depositary at San Francisco

564,387 96 399,755 78 164,632 18 Depositary at Little Rock, Arkansas..

67,384 04 35,705 30 31,678 74 Depositary at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

48,163 39 10,633 17 37,530 22 Depositary at Chicago, Illinois..

83,595 45 16,885 33 66,710 12 Depositary at Detroit, Michigan

27.124 96 19,526 18 7,598 78 Depositary at Tallahassee, Florida...... 15,731 76 2,542 52 13,189 24 Suspense account... ..$2,486 66

2,486 66 Mint of the U. S., Philadelphia, Penn..... 5,649,900 Co

5,649,900 00 Branch Mint of U. S., Charlotte, N. C..... 32,000 00

32,000 00 Branch Mint of U.S., Dahlonega, Ga... 26,850 00

26,850 00 Branch Mint of U. S., New Orleans, La... 960,000 00 100,000 00 860,000 00 Total.....

12,928,090 95 1,710,238 04 11,220,344 57 Deduct suspense account.

2,486 66

........

Add difference in transfers

$11,217,857 91

1,555,540 00

Net amount subject to draft......

$12,773,397 91 Transfers ordered to Treasury of the United States, Washington. $460,000 00 Transfers ordered to Assistant Treasurer, New Orleans, Louisiana. 975,000 00 Transfers ordered to Assistant Treasurer, St. Louis, Missouri..... Transfers ordered to Depositary at Norfolk, Virginia.....

120,000 00 Transfers ordered from Assistant Treasurer, Pittsburg, Pa... ..

540 00

$1,655,540 00

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"A NATIONAL CURRENCY :" CONFIDENCE ITS BASIS. FREEMAN Hunt, Esq., Editor of the Merchants' Magazine, etc:

Sin :- Allow a constant reader of your valuable journal to offer some reflections upon the above subject. Though much debated, yet the many opposing theories thereon show how little it is understood. Some insist upon “a metallic basis,” some upon “credit as a basis," while a late writer, N. F. C., in your journal, vigorously, pushes forward his own favorite theory of “A National Currency: Real Estate its Basis.” The first of these is no doubt a substantial basis, the second, with perhaps some sup: port, is a very essential one, while the last, contradictory as it may seem, is not a real one. The views of Dr. Hall on this subject are well worthy of the attention of your readers, being clearly laid down, his elucidations being much to the point. The theory now offered is not proposed as a new one, but merely as the placing of the ideas of others in a tangible form, for in it nothing absolutely new is asserted, nor will it disagree with the ideas or opinions of any.N. F. C., in his paper, first pours a broadside into the banks, (well merited,) to whose parlors he traces the late panic in the money market, which appeared without notice and without apparent cause, for the country was everywhere prosperous, and the panic chiefly confined to the city and its immediate dependencies. `N. F. C. then proposes that the money-making power should be taken from the banks and put with the State, that the basis of these issues should be the real values, or real estate of the country, that the State should give the owner of productive real estate money in “State noter” equal to a certain valuation on the real estate, taking a mortgage as security, without interest-the valuation to be made by “a board of value," and the sum loaned should never exceed the policy of insurance, the amount of which policy should be the touchstone of value.

Now we have to inquire, Will these State issues have any more substantial basis, though it may be real estate, than “ bank-votes"—is not real estate as fluctuating as other values i Can real estate sustain a value put upon it (against reverses) by this board of value and insurance policy ? or is it the indorsement of the State" bearing the proud name of Pennsylvania, New York,” or Missouri, that is to sustain it against depreciation! (Pennsylvania credit once fell to 37.) Real estate is valuable like everything else, only in proportion to the uses to which it may be applied, and like everything else depreciates in times of panic. Who is there who does not know of real estate which has depreciated 75 per cent, and of insurance policies on which, after a loss by fire, payment even of 60 per cent, on a just and bona fide valuation of damage, has been stoutly disputed, and that too by the most B ESPECTABLE companies? There is a speculation in real estate as well as stocks, and a much greater uncertainty in its value. See what vast changes have taken place in value of real estate even in this city of New York in the last few years ; depreciation in some situations, increase in others. Who has forgotten the condition of real estate in 1838 and 1840 1 houses vacant, and stores to let. Value of real estate and business prosperity rise and fall together. If this is so, and that it is so no one can deny, upon what must these State notes depend for their value but State credit ? and what is that worth in hard times? Then the notes will certainly come back for redemption. Redemption in what i real estateor gold! Whether they are backed by real estate or not, the only way to give value to these State notes is to induce the community, and the world at larga, to believe they have equal value to gold, or to beget confidence in them, for without confidence, in a commercial point of view, there is no real value in anything, except such things as are absolutely necessary to our existence. Water and air exist everywhere, and can be got without labor, therefore they may be said to be without value. Bread to eat and clothing such as is necessary to keep us warm cannot be bad without labor, therefore they are of value, they have intrinsic values. Bread may increase greatly in value, but does not depreciate greatly in value.

One country being at peace while the rest of the world was at war, would of course alter the relative value of things very much.

But in a state of general peace, if there should be once established a general confidence in the commercial circles, there would be a great increase of value both in commercial things and real estate ; but once destroy that confidence, and real estate will fall as rapidly as other things of value, and the absolute necessaries of life would fall less than real estate. In fact, the value of real estate depends on the general prosperity of the country, and the foundation of this can always be traced to confidence. Upon this also depends a merchant's credit, før let his wealth be what it may, if the conımercial world have no confidence in his business ability, bis industry, and integrity, he can get no credit, and so with corporations and communities of all

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