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duty on wools ought to be at once removed. The protectionists who seek to aid the manufacturer, and the advocates of free trade can both unite in this measure, and it ought to be carried at once. The same principle ought also to be extended to raw silk, and to all articles of dye-stuffs and chemicals used in manufacturing.

There is still another difficulty in the way of manufacturers; the outside machinery is too cumbersome. It is notorious that while stockholders in large manufacturing establishments have found the business a poor investment, nearly all others connected with the production have grown rich, or at least gained a competence. The unnecessary expenses attending the getting up, and carrying on of a large establishment, are often quite suflicient to swallow up the profits.

During the month past a considerable amount of federal stocks have been returned here, from abroad, for sale. At first this excited some attention, as many supposed that fear of the future foreign policy of our government led European bondholders to distrust our national securities. It has since been ascertained that these returned bonds are but proofs of greater confidence in the permanence of our prosperity. The high price of United States Stocks as compared with equally safe city and railroad bonds, has induced many foreigners to sell out the former to invest in the latter. Not a few of our government bonds were taken below the present quotations, and the tempting prices now obtained, in connection with the favorable opportunities offered for investments believed to be fully as secure, are having their influence upon bondholders. We annex a comparison of the price of United States 6's of 1867 at the corresponding period of the last four years:

1819. 1850. 1851. 1852. February 23d....

111? 1125 1158 1151 The banks throughout the country are in a very healthy condition, and it is believed will be able to sustain themselves without any farther contraction of their loans and discounts. The institutions established for the sake of mere circulation have been more closely watched, and their business has been less profitable.

We annex our usual monthly statement of the deposits and coinage at the Phil. adelphia and New Orleans mints for the month of January :

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Total gold coinage ...

$795,000

-39,750

505,659

$4,222,116

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Total coinage... 63,750 $807,000 1,004,808 $4,242,356 The receipts of California gold since the opening of the year have disappointed the expectations of the public, the whole amount up to this present writing (about the close of February) not having reached $7,000,000. Correspondents in San Francisco, however, see not to have lost their courage, and are still quite sanguine of sending forward large amounts during the spring months.

The year has opened with a decline in the value of our foreign imports, which will be very acceptable to those who judge by this comparison of the prosperity of the country. At New York the falling off as compared with the previous year, for the month of January, was about $3,500,000, or more than one quarter of the entire receipts, as will be seen by the following comparison :

IMPORTS FROM FOREIGN PORTS AT NEW YORK FOR JANUARY.

Year.

Dutiable.
Foreign.
Specie.

Total. 1852....

$10,168,963 $1,041,456 $104,736 $11,315,165 1851..

13,732.764 937,650 210,455 14,880,869 1850..

11,446,496 437,270 433,882 12,317,648 Notwithstanding the lateness of the trade, more goods have been withdrawn from warehouse during the month than have been entered, showing that the stock in bond has actually decreased ; this is a state of things which has not happened before during the month of January, since the present bonded system was adopted :

WAREHOUSING MOVEMENT AT NEW YORK FOR JANUARY.

Year.
1852 ...
1851
1850

Entered warehouse. Withdr'n i'm warehouse

$1,281,594 $1,584,652
1,611,847

1,024,246
950,753

902,965

The decline in the imports from the corresponding month of last year, of threeand-a-half millions, as shown above, is only about half of it in dry goods—this will be fully seen in the following comparative statement :

IMPORTS OF DRY GOODS ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION, AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK, DURING

THE MONTH OF JANUARY

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WITHDRAWN FROM WAREHOUSE DURING THE SAME PERIOD.

1850.

1851. Manufactures of wool....

$94,513 $105,827 Manufactures of cotton.

190,243

254,224 Manufactures of silk...

149,029

106,370 Manufactures of flax

40,889

109,935 Miscellaneous dry goods..

26,031

53,950

1858. $214,102 280,601 291,886 121,635 22,320

Total......
Add entered for consumption ..

$500,705 6,748,492

$630,306 8,708,883

$930,544 6,605,811

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Total thrown upon the market $7,249,197 $9,338,189 $7,537,355 The falling off has been pretty uniform in woolens, cottons, silks, and linens, as far as it relates to the goods entered directly for consumption, which comprises the bulk of the importation. There have been more dry goods entered for warehousing than usual, particularly of silks--the trade in staple silk fabrics not having opened until the 1st of February :ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSING DURING THE MONTH OF JANUARY.

1850. 1851.

1852. Manufactures of wool..

$79,830 $139,656 $184,111 Manufactures of cotton.

295,557 222,412 208,856 Manufactures of silk.

116,006 206,005 837,357 Manufactures of flax.

56,145 54,355 66,839 Miscellaneous dry goods...

8,012 42,263 24,402 Total .......

$555,550 $664,681 $1,321,565 The exports from New York for January, also show a considerable decline from the corresponding period of 1851, in the articles of domestic produce other than specie, although the aggregate total is greater :

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK, TO FOREIGN PORTS, FOR JANUARY,
Year.
Domestic produce. Foreign mer'dise. Specie.

Total. 1852..

$2,419,296 $384,937 $2,868,958 $5,673,191 1851..

3,152,744 473,979 1,266,281 4,893,004 1850.. 2,715,320 456,851

90,361 3,262,532 1849..

2,109,095 152,590 122,582 2,384,267 The following comparison will show the relative shipments of the different articles of produce comprised in the above statement for the first two periods named, and will be found very interesting in this connection. We have conpiled it from official entries expressly for the readers of the Magazine :EXPORTS OF CERTAIN ARTICLES OF DOMESTIC PRODUCE FROM NEW YORK, TO FOREIGN PORTS, FROM JANUARY 1, TO FEBRUARY 22.

1851. 1852 Ashes-Pot....

.bbls.
3,953

1,298 Pearl..

775

77 Beeswax...

... lbs. 57,051 43,141 Breadstuff's Wheat flour.

..bbls. 80,660 69,667 Rye flour.

153

337 Corn meal

4,126

3,734 Wheat

.bushels 52,664 121,810 Rye...

3,003 548

919 Corn.

47,029 68,267 Candles-Mould.

..boxes

5,913

7,826 Sperm....

213

190 Coal

tons 410

3,885

Oats...

Lard.....

..

1851. 1852. Cotton

.bales 39,147 66,255 Hops...

202 Naval Stores.

..bbls. 30,403 70,130 Oil-Whale.

.gallons 118,033

7,731 Sperm

89,978 13,023 Lard..

97,381 13,980 Linseed

2,373 ProvisionsPork

.bbls.
4,322

6,816 Beef...

3,958

4,514 Cut meats..

.lbs. 682,594 628,408 Butter...

231,144 80,512 Cheese.

1,035,325 311,269

260,744 240,628 Rice..

tcs.
5,967

7,417 Tallow

. lbs.

790,856 237,522 Tobacco-Crude...

.pkgs. 3,182

2,680 Manufactured

lbs. 402,927 283,500 Whalebone....

75,823 36,528 It will be seen from the above that the decline since January 1st, in the exports of flour from New York, has been fully made up by the increase in wheat. In corn there has also been an increase, and most other articles of domestic produce exhibit a favorable comparison. In our last we gave a similar statement for the year 1851, and we propose to continue it throughout the current year as a matter of growing interest to our readers. Our predictions of a decline in the imports, in the face of the estimates of the Secretary of the Treasury, anticipating a continuance of the large amounts received last year, have been fully verified. The imports at New York for January as given above, show a falling off of about $3,500,000, and the decline in February will swell this difference to nearly, or quite $6,000,000. This decline at the port where two-thirds of all the imports of the country are received, is a fair index of the business of the whole, and shows that our foreign commerce will regulate itself without those restraints, which those who think their will stronger than the laws of demand and supply, would impose. Supposing the same comparative difference to have extended to other parts, and the decline throughout the United States in two months would equal $8,000,000, or at the rate of about $50,000,000 for the year. This is a reduction of nearly 25 per cent on our entire imports; but this ratio of decrease is not likely to continue throughout the year.

The news brought by the Cambria of a decline of id. per ounce in the price paid by the Bank of England for American gold coin, has had a tendency to check the shipments of specie, and to increase the relative value of exchange. The reason given for the decline is the increased quantity of alloy said to be detected by assay, but the truth of this theory is very doubtful.

The price now paid is £3 16s. 14d. which will make a difference of nearly in the net return of shipments as compared with bills of exchange.

JOURNAL OF BANKING, CURRENCY, AND FINANCE.

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RESOURCES, TAXATION, ETC., OF PENNSYLVANIA. STATEMENT SHOWING THE VALUATION OF REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE IN THE SEVERAL

COUNTIES OF THE COMMONWEALTH, TAXABLE FOR STATE PURPOSES, ASD TUE ASSESS-
MENT OF TAX TIEREON FOR THE YEAR 1851, AS FIXED BY THE REVENUE COMMIS-
SIONERS AT THEIR LAST TRIENNIAL MEETING—ALSO, THE POPULATION OF EACH COUNTY,
ACCORDING TO THE CENSUS OF 1850, AND THE TAXABLE INHABITANTS THEREIN, FOR
THE SAME YEAR.

Assessment
Counties.

Valuation.

of tax. Population. Taxables. Adams

$4,673,224 $14,372 25.981 5,761 Allegheny

24,008,220 74,785 138,290 25,067

2,071,330 6,690 29,560 6,002 Beaver

3,609,585 11,072 26,689 5,727 Bedford..

2,207,904 6,736 23,052 4,545 Berks

22,536,613 68,720 77,129 15,949 Blair. 4,042,564 12,554 21,777

4.556 Bradford.

3,564,791 10,883 42.831 8,763 Bucks.

16,9 10,832 51,746 56.091 13,151 Butler.

2,620.125 8,051 30,346 7,490 Cambria.

1,063,185 3,450 17,773 3,642 Carbon

2,057,999 6,685 15.686 3,742 Center..

5,043,876 15,620 23,355 4,945 Chester.

21,899,132 66,966 66,439 14,784 Clarion

1,633,882 6,019 23.565 5,087 Clearfield

1,115,792 3,38+ 12,586 2,672 Clinton..

1,837,669 5,854 11,207 2,346 Columbia

4,883,477 15,050 17,710 6,670 Crawford..

2,984,162 9,142 37,819 8,130 Cumberland.

10,595,808 32,843 34.327 7,658 Dauphin.

9,781,493 30,577 35,754 7,683 Delaware..

8,578,363 26,441 24,679 5,253 Elk..

393,830

1,201
3,531

876 Erie..

3,848,526 11,966 38,742 8,434 Fayette..

5,248,920 16,161 39,112 7,888 Forest. Franklin

11,939,842 36,867 39,904 9,312 Fulton ..

710,205 2,179 7,567 1,716 Greene..

2,882,862 8,918 22,136 4,447 Huntingdon

5,403,633 16,664 24,786 5,637

2,534.692 7,788 27,170 5,540 Jefferson.

980,958 3,003 13,518 2,629

2,709.392 8,253 13,029 3,112 Lancaster...

30,6 15,081 94,293 98,944 23,240 Lawrence.

2,804,064 8,659 21,079 4,425 Lebanon.

7,87(0,054 23,993 26,071 5,949 Lehigh 8,489,166 26,225 32,479

17,286 Luzerne

5,176,352 15,827 56,072 11,027 Lycoming.

3,575,326 11,096 26,257 6,141 McKean

639,404

1,636

6,254 1.213 Mercer

3,446,214 10,563 33,172 7,729 Mifflin..

4,153,775 12,745 14,980 3,252 Monroe ..

1,566,116 4,832 13,270 3,052 Montgomery

16,649,664 50,983 58,291 13,422 Moptour.

13,239 Northampton

13,708,659 42,362 40,235 9,285 Northumberland

4,434,205 13,895 23,272 4,613 Perry

3.057,500 9,375 20.088 4,456 Philadelphia.

136,589,627 432,331 408,762 79,259 Pike

670,403 2,079 6,881 1,198

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Indiana....

Juniata ..

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