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So the resolution was laid on the table. Mr. Pendleton submitted the following resolution, viz: Resolved, That the Secretary of War be instructed to communicate to this house— 1. The whole number of troops furnished by each State since the war commenced, giving the number of three months men under the call for 75,000 men; 2. The number furnished by each State under the call for 500,000 o stating the number of one, two, and three years men furnished y each; 3. The number of volunteers furnished by each State under the call for 300,000 volunteers, with the terms of service, whether for one, two, or three years, or for nine months; 4. The number of men furnished by each State under the last call for 300,000 men, stating whether they were drafted or volunteered; 5. The quota assigned to each State under the said respective calls for troops. The same having been read, Mr. Justin S. Morrill moved that it be laid on the table. And the question being put,

It was decided in the affirmative, Navs . . . . . . . . - - - -
The yeas and nays being desired by one-fifth of the members present,

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Those who voted in the affirmative are—

. Cyrus Aldrich
James M. Ashley
Elijah Babbitt
Stephen Baker
John A. Bingham
Jacob B. Blair
Harrison G. Blake
James Buffinton
Jacob P. Chamberlain
Ambrose W. Clark
Schuyler Colfax
Frederick A. Conkling
Roscoe Conkling
John Covode
William P. Cutler
Henry L. Dawes
Sidney Edgerton
Thomas D. Eliot
Alfred Ely
Thomas A. D. Fessenden
George P. Fisher
Richard Franchot
Augustus Frank
Daniel W. Gooch

Mr. John N. Goodwin
John A. Gurley
Richard A. Harrison
John Hickman
Samuel Hooper
Valentine B. Horton
John Hutchins
William D. Kelley
Francis W. Kellogg
John W. Killinger
William E. Lansing
Owen Lovejoy
Frederick F. Low
Edward McPherson
James K. Moorhead
Anson P. Morrill
Justin S. Morrill
John T. Nixon
John W. Noell
John Patton
Timothy G. Phelps
Frederick A. Pike
Theodore M. Pomeroy
Albert G. Porter

Those who voted in the negative are–

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So the resolution was laid on the table. Mr. Gurley submitted the following resolution; which was read, considered, and, under the operation of the previous question, agreed to, viz: Resolved, That the President be requested to transmit to this house,

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Mr.

John F. Potter
Alexander H. Rice
John H. Rice
Albert G. Riddle
Edward H. Rollins
Aaron A. Sargent
John P. C. Shanks
William P. Sheffield
Samuel Shellabarger
A. Scott Sloan
Thaddeus Stevens
John L. N. Stratton
Benjamin F. Thomas
Rowland E. Trowbridge
Burt Van Horn
Rob't B. Van Walkenburgh
John P. Verree
John W. Wallace
Ellihu B. Washburne
Albert S. White
James F. Wilson
William Windom
Samuel T. Worcester.

James S. Rollins
George K. Shiel
John B. Steele
John D. Stiles
Francis Thomas
Clement L. Wallandigham
Daniel W. Woorhees
William H. Wadsworth
Elijah Ward
Charles A. Wickliffe
George C. Woodruff
Hendrick B. Wright
George H. Yeaman.

so far as not incompatible with the public interest, all correspondence between the President and General George B. McClellan, and between any department of the government and General George B. McClellan since the campaign of the peninsula was undertaken. Mr. Shellabarger submitted the following resolution; which was read, considered, and agreed to, viz: Resolved, That the Committee on Military Affairs be directed to inquire and report to this house whether any legislation is necessary to secure the more prompt examination of sick and disabled soldiers

with reference to their discharge from the service for permanent disability.

Mr. Blake submitted a resolution, which he subsequently modified as follows, and which was read, considered, and agreed to, viz:

Resolved, That the Committee on Military Affairs be instructed to inquire into the expediency of establishing a board of hospital commissioners, to be composed of civilians, the duty of said board to be to look after the sick and wounded, to facilitate the discharge of the disabled, and to more effectually secure the comfort and provide for the wants of soldiers in hospitals and convalescent camps, and report by bill or otherwise.

Mr. William Kellogg submitted the following resolution; which was read, considered, and agreed to, viz:

Resolved, That the Committee on the Territories be instructed to inquire into the propriety of establishing a territorial government for that region of country in which are situated the “Salmon River gold mines," and that they report by bill or otherwise.

Mr. Mallory submitted the following resolution; which was read, considered, and agreed to, viz:

Resolved, That the Committee of Ways and Means be instructed to inquire into the propriety of taxing the bonds of canal companies, and report by bill or otherwise.

On motion of Mr. Stevens, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union; and after some time spent therein, the Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Dawes reported that the committee having, according to order, had the state of the Union generally under consideration, and particularly the annual message af the President of the United States, had come to no resolution thereon.

And then,
On motion of Mr. Stiles, at 4 o'clock p. m., the House adjourned.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1862.

Another member appeared, viz:
From the State of New York, James B. McKean.

The following petitions and memorial were laid upon the Clerk's table, under the rule:

By Mr. Trowbridge: The petition of refiners of Canada petroleum oil of Michigan, asking for a reduction of the tariff on the crude oil from Canada; which was referred to the Committee of Ways and Means.

By Mr. Frederick A. Conkling: The memorial of William Brand, praying for relief under his contract to furnish materials for the Navy Department; which was referred to the Committee on Naval Affairs.

By Mr. Patton: The petition of C. Hall, for compensation for lumber taken for the use of the army by order of General McCook; which was referred to the Committee of Claims.

The Speaker, by unanimous consent, laid before the House the following message, received from the President of the United States, viz:

er to me, itled to complime

Fellow-citizens of the Senate and House of Representatives :

I have in my possession three valuable swords, formerly the property of General David E. Twiggs, which I now place at the disposal of Congress. They were forwarded to me from New Orleans by Major General Benjamin F. Butler. If they or any of them shall be by Congress disposed of in reward or compliment of military service, I think General Butler is entitled to the first consideration. A copy of the general's letter to me, accompanying the swords, is herewith transmitted.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN. DECEMBER 12, 1862. The same having been read,

Ordered, That it be referred to the Committee on Military Affairs, and printed.

The Speaker also, by unanimous consent, laid before the House a letter from the Secretary of the Treasury, transmitting a statement of the contingent expenses of his department during the last fiscal year; which was laid on the table, and ordered to be printed.

The Speaker having announced as the regular order of business the resolutions submitted by Mr. Stevens on the 4th instant, the consideration of which was postponed until this day

On motion of Mr. Stevens, under the operation of the previous question,

Ordered, That the further consideration of the said resolutions be postponed until Tuesday, the 6th of January next.

Mr. Stevens moved that the vote last taken be reconsidered, and also moved that the motion to reconsider be laid on the table; which latter motion was agreed to.

The Speaker then announced as the business next in order the resolutions submitted on the 8th instant by Mr. Wright, the consideration of which was postponed until this day. Mr. Vallandigham submitted the following amendment thereto, viz:

Strike out all after word “Resolved” where it first occurs and insert: That the Union as it was must be restored and maintained forever under the Constitution as it is, the article providing for amendments included.

2. That no final treaty of peace ending the present civil war can be permitted to be made by the Executive or any other person in the civil or military service of the United States on any other basis than the integrity and entirety of the federal Union, and of the several States composing the same as at the beginning of hostilities; and that upon that basis peace ought immediately to be made.

3. That this government can never permit armed or hostile intervention by any foreign power in regard to the present civil war.

4. Resolved, That the unhappy civil war in which we are engaged was waged in the beginning, professedly, "not in any spirit of oppression or for any purpose of conquest or subjugation, or purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of the States, but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Con

stitution and to preserve the Union with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired,” and was so understood and accepted by the people, and especially by the army and navy of the United States; and that, therefore, whoever shall pervert or attempt to pervert the same to a war of conquest and subjugation, or for the overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of any of the States, and to abolish slavery therein, or for the purpose of destroying or impairing the dignity, equality, or rights of any of the States, will be guilty of a flagrant breach of public faith, and of a high crime against the Constitution and the Union. 5. That whoever shall propose by federal authority to extinguish any of the States of this Union, or to declare any of them extinguished, and to establish territorial governments or permanent military governments within the same, will be deserving of the censure of this house and of the country. 6. That whoever shall attempt to establish a dictatorship in the United States, thereby superseding or suspending the constitutional authorities of the Union, or to clothe the President, or any other officer, civil or military, with dictatorial or arbitrary power, will be guilty of a high crime against the Constitution and the Union, and public liberty. The same having been read, Mr. Wickliffe moved to amend the said amendment by adding thereto the following, viz: “Resolved, That all who are opposed to the closing of this war upon the principle of preserving the Constitution as it is, and the restoration of the Union as it was formed by that Constitution, is an enemy of the country, and is unfit to hold any office of trust or profit.” The same having been read, On motion of Mr. Wright, Ordered, That the further consideration of the said resolutions and pending amendments be postponed until Tuesday, the 6th of January next. On motion of Mr. Stevens, by unanimous consent, Ordered, That the bill of the House (H. R. 611) making appropriations for the support of the Military Academy, &c., be made a special order for this day, in lieu of Friday next, as heretofore ordered. Mr. Cox, by unanimous consent, submitted the following resolution; which was read, considered, and agreed to, viz: Resolved, That the Secretary of the Treasury be directed to furnish to this house a statement of the amount of the United States loan created in 1841 and extended by the act of April 15, 1842, which will fall due during the present year; and also the names of those who are registered as the owners thereof; and such information as the department may possess as to the actual ownership thereof; and that the Secretary of the Treasury communicate to this house a copy or copies of any memorial or memorials addressed to him proposing or soliciting a special medium of payment to the owners or holders of the said loan; and whether he proposes to pay said loan in coin. Mr. Windom, by unanimous consent, introduced a bill (H. R. 614)

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