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ports of American growth and manufacture, exclusive of specie; with leave to report by bill or otherwise.

The same having been read, Mr. Low moved the previous question ; which was seconded and the main question ordered, and under the operation thereof the said resolution was disagreed to.

A message in writing was received from the President of the United States, by Mr. Hay, his private secretary, which was handed in at the Speaker's table.

A message from the Senate, by Mr. Forney, their Secretary :

Mr. Speaker: The Senate have disagreed to the amendment of this house to the amendment of the Senate to the bill of the House (H. R. 581) concerning judgments in certain suits brought by the United States.

Mr. Aldrich submitted the following resolution ; which was read, considered, and agreed to, viz :

Resolved. That the Committee on Military Affairs be, and are hereby. instructed to inquire into the propriety, expediency, and necessity of providing for the dismissal from the volunteer service of the army all incompetent and unfit commissioned officers in that branch of the military service, and report by bill or otherwise.

Mr. Conway submitted the following resolutions, viz :

Resolved, That freedom and slavery cannot coexist in the same gor. ernment without producing endless strife and civil war; that "a house divided against itself cannot stand;" and that “this nation must be all free or all slave.”.

Resolved, That the American Union consists of those States which are now loyal to the federal Constitution.

Resolved, That the restoration of the Union as it existed prior to the rebellion would be a greater calamity than the rebellion itself, since it would give new life to the “irrepressible conflict,” and entail upon the nation another cycle of bitter contention and civil war.

Resolved, That the seceded States can only be put down, if at all, by being regarded as out of constitutional relations with the Union. and by being assailed upon principles of ordinary warfare as between separate nations.

Resolved, That if any person in the employment of the United States, in either the legislative or executive branches, should propose to make peace, or should accept or advise the acceptance of any such proposition, on any basis which would restore the slave power to its former supremacy in the government, or by any new compromise or amendment to the Constitution recognize slavery as an element of political power, such person will be guilty of a high crime.

Resolved, That the superior resources and military prowess of the north in this struggle are beyond dispute; and that the question of its success turns not upon its relative ability, but on the fitness of its Chief Executive Magistrate to give effect to its power.

Resolved, That it is unsafe to intrust the execution of any system of administration to persons who are not in cordial sympathy there. with; and that no change of policy in the conduct of the war is more than nominal which is not accompanied by a complete change in the personnel of the executive department. Resolved, That it is a matter for serious reflection whether another election of President must not supervene before the rightful authority of the nation can be established; and whether, in the mean time, it is not a flagrant waste of our energies to continue the war. Resolved, That unless the army of the west shall have swept through the valley of the Mississippi to its mouth, and the army of the Potomac annihilated the legions of Lee and Jackson, thus subverting the military power of the rebellion within a reasonable time, the best interests of the country and humanity will require a cessation of hostilities. Resolved, That the States of the north composing the American nation, and wielding its power, must ever remain one and undivisible on the basis of freedom for all, without distinction of race, color, or condition; that their mission must ever be to extend their own civilization over the entire continent, and that whatever derangements, difficulties, checks, or defeats they may encounter, they must forever cherish and pursue the inspiring idea of nationality and contimental dominion. The same having been read, Mr. Conway moved that their further consideration be postponed until to-morrow. Pending which, Mr. Maynard moved that the resolutions be laid on the table. And the question being put,

It was decided in the affirmative, } N aV - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1

The yeas and nays being desired by one-fifth of the members present, Those who voted in the affirmative are—

Mr. Cyrus Aldrich Mr. John J. Crittenden Mr. Edward Haight
William J. Allen William P. Cutler William A. Hall
John B. Alley Henry L. Dawes Aaron Harding
Sydenham E. Ancona Charles Delano Richard A. Harrison
Elijah Babbitt Isaac C. Delaplaine John Hickman
Joseph Baily R. Holland Duell William S. Holman
Stephen Baker George W. Dunlap Samuel Hooper
Fernando C. Beaman W. McKee Dunn John Hutchins
Charles J. Biddle Sidney Edgerton George W. Julian
John A. Bingham Thomas M. Edwards William D. Kelley
Samuel S. Blair Thomas D. Eliot William Kellogg
Harrison G. Blake James E. English James E. Kerrigan
William G. Brown Reuben E. Fenton John W. Killinger
James Buffinton Samuel C. Fessenden William E. Lansing
Charles B. Calvert Thomas A. D. Fessenden Cornelius L. L. Leary
Jacob P. Chamberlain George P. Fisher Dwight Loomis
Ambrose W. Clark Philip B. Fouke Owen Lovejoy
Andrew J. Clements Richard Franchot Frederick F. Low
George T. Cobb Augustus Frank Robert McKnight
Schuyler Colfax Daniel W. Gooch Edward McPherson
Frederick A. Conkling John N. Goodwin Robert Mallory
Roscoe Conkling Bradley F. Granger Horace Maynard
Samuel S. Cox Henry Grider John W. Menzies

John W. Crisfield John A. Gurley William Mitchell

Mr. James K. Moorhead Mr. James C. Robinson Mr. Clement L. Wallandigham
Anson P. Morrill Edward H. Rollins Burt Van Horn
Justin S. Morrill Aaron A. Sargent Rob't B. Van Walkenburgh
James R. Morris Charles B. Sedgwick John P. Verree
John T. Nixon Joseph Segar William H. Wadsworth
Warren P. Noble John P. C. Shanks . Amasa Walker
John W. Noell William P. Sheffield William Wall
Elijah H. Norton Samuel Shellabarger John W. Wallace
Moses F. Odell George K. Shiel Elijah Ward
John Patton A. Scott Sloan Ellihu B. Washburne
George H. Pendleton Edward H. Smith Kellian V. Whaley
Frederick A. Pike Elbridge G. Spaulding Albert S. White
Theodore M. Pomeroy John B. Steele Chilton A. White
Albert G. Porter John D. Stiles Charles A. Wickliffe
John F. Potter John L. N. Stratton James F. Wilson
Thomas L. Price Benjamin F. Thomas William Windom
Alexander H. Rice Francis Thomas George C. Woodruff
John H. Rice Charles R. Train Samuel T. Worcester
William A. Richardson Carey A. Trimble Hendrick B. Wright
Albert G. Riddle Rowland E. Trowbridge George H. Yeaman.

Mr. Conway voted in the negative. So the resolutions were laid on the table. Mr. Maynard moved that the vote last taken be reconsidered, and also moved that the motion to reconsider be laid on the table ; which latter motion was agreed to. Notices were given under the rule of motions for leave to introduce bills as follows, viz: By Mr. Windom : A bill for the removal of the Winnebago Indians from the State of Minnesota. By Mr. Aldrich: A bill providing for the removal of the Sioux or Dakota Indians from the State of Minnesota. Mr. Samuel C. Fessenden submitted the following resolutions, viz: Resolved. That the proclamation of the President of the United States, of the date of the 22d September, 1862, is warranted by the Constitution. Resolved, That the policy of emancipation, as indicated in that proclamation, is well adapted to hasten the restoration of peace, was well chosen as a war measure, and is an exercise of power with proper regard for the rights of the citizen and the perpetuity of free government. The same having been read, Mr. Fessenden moved the previous question. Pending which, Mr. Holman moved that the resolutions be laid on the table. And the question being put, It was decided in the negative, {{................... ; The yeas and nays being desired by one-fifth of the members present, Those who voted in the affirmative are—

Mr. William J. Allen Mr. Charles B. Calvert Mr. John J. Crittenden
Sydenham E. Ancona George T. Cobb Isaac C. Delaplaine
Joseph Baily Samuel S. Cox George W. Dunlap
Charles J. Biddle James A. Cravens James E. English

William G. Brown John W. Crisfield Philip B. Fouke

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Mr. Cyrus Aldrich
John B. Alley
Isaac N. Arnold
Elijah Babbitt
Stephen Baker
Fernando C. Beaman
John A. Bingham
Samuel S. Blair
Harrison G. Blake
James Buffinton
Alfred A. Burnham
Jacob P. Chamberlain
Ambrose W. Clark
Schuyler Colfax
Frederick A. Conkling
Roscoe Conkling
William P. Cutler
Henry L. Dawes
Charles Delano
R. Holland Duell
W. McKee Dunn
Sidney Edgerton
Thomas M. Edwards
Reuben E. Fenton
Samuel C. Fessenden
Thomas A. D. Fessenden
George P. Fisher

Mr. Richard Franchot
Augustus Frank
Daniel W. Gooch
John N. Goodwin
John A. Gurley
Edward Haight
John Hickman
John Hutchins
George W. Julian
William D. Kelley
Francis W. Kellogg
William Kellogg
John W. Killinger
William E. Lansing
Dwight Loomis
Owen Lovejoy
Frederick F. Low
Edward McPherson
James K. Moorhead
Anson P. Morrill
John T. Nixon
John W. Noell
John Patton
Frederick A. Pike
Theodore M. Pomeroy
Albert G. Porter
John F. Potter

So the House refused to lay the resolutions on the table.

The question then recurring on the demand for the previous question, it was seconded and the main question ordered and put, viz: Will the House agree to the said resolutions?

And it was decided in the affirmative,

Yeas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nays. . . . . . . . . - - - - - -

The yeas and nays being desired by one-fifth of the members present, Those who voted in the affirmative are—

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Mr. John D. Stiles
Benjamin F. Thomas
Francis Thomas
Clement L. Wallandigham
William H. Wadsworth
Elijah Ward
Kellian W. Whaley
Chilton A. White
Charles A. Wickliffe
George C. Woodruff
Hendrick B. Wright
George H. Yeaman.

Mr. Alexander H. Rice
John H. Rice
Albert G. Riddle
Edward H. Rollins
Aaron A. Sargent
John P. C. Shanks
Samuel Shellabarger
A. Scott Sloan
Elbridge G. Spaulding
Thaddeus Stevens
John L. N. Stratton
Charles R. Train
Carey A. Trimble
Rowland E. Trowbridge
Burt Van Horn
Rob't B. Van Walkenburgh
Charles H. Wan Wyck
John P. Verree
Amasa Walker
William Wall
John W. Wallace
Ellihu B. Washburne
Albert S. White
James F. Wilson
William Windom
Samuel T. Worcester

78 52

Mr. Charles Delano
R. Holland Louell
Sidney Edgerton
Thomas M. Edwards
Thomas D. Eliot
Alfred Ely
Reuben E. Fenton
Samuel C. Fessenden
Thomas A. D. Fessenden

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So the resolutions were agreed to. Mr. Fessenden moved that the vote last taken be reconsidered, and also moved that the motion to reconsider be laid on the table; which latter motion was agreed to. Mr. Cobb, from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported that the committee had examined and found truly enrolled bills of the

following titles, viz:

Mr. Aaron A. Sargent

Charles B. Sedgwick
Samuel Shellabarger
A. Scott Sloan
Elbridge G. Spaulding
Charles R. Train
Rowland E. Trowbridge
Rob't B. Van Walkenburgh
Charles H. Van Wyck
John P. Verree
Amasa Walker
William Wall
Ellihu B. Washburne
Albert S. White
James F. Wilson

. William Windom

Samuel T. Worcester.

Mr. James S. Rollins

William P. Sheffield
George K. Shiel
Edward H. Smith
John B. Steele
John D. Stiles
Benjamin F. Thomas
Francis Thomas
Clement L. Wallandigham
William H. Wadsworth
Elijah Ward
Kellian W. Whaley
Chilton A. White
Charles A. Wickliffe
George C. Woodruff
Hendrick B. Wright
George H. Yeaman.

S. 405. An act authorizing the holding of a special session of the United States district court for the district of Indiana;

S. 406. An act for the relief of the owners of the French brig “Jules et Marie;” and

S. 365. An act for the admission of the State of “West Virginia’’ into the Union, and for other purposes.

When

The Speaker signed the same. Mr. Stevens, from the Committee of Ways and Means, reported bills of the following titles, viz: H. R. 610. A bill making appropriations for the support of the army for the year ending June 30, 1864;

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