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TE STIM ONIALS.

fhe Utterances of the Patriotism of Illinois During the War—The Emancipa*

tion Proclamation) the Key Note of the Campaign—The Great Speech of

Honest Farmer Funk—A Stirring Letter from Gen. Logan to His Soidiers—

Letter from Col. Frank Sherman—Extracts from Speeches of Hon. Richard

Yates, Hon, Lyman Trumbull, Hon, Owen Lovejoy, Gen. Farnsworth, Hon. I.

CONTENTS 31

PAOTE.

N*. Arnold—President's Lincoln's Inaugural Address, Last Speech and Procla-

mation—The North American Review and Kentucky Letter—Mr. Lincoln

Dead 511

CHAPTER XXXII.

ILLINOIS ON THE POTOMAC.

Campaigns of East and West—Virginia the Battle-ground—Its Natural Divi-

sions—Campaigns of Western Virginia—General Scott—Bull Run—General

McClellan-—Waiting—" On to Richmond "—Yorktown—Battles of the Chick-

ahominj—Pope—McClellan—Burnside—Fredericksburg-—" No. 8 "—Hooker

—Chancellorsville—Lee's Strategy—His Advance on Pennsylvania—New

Call—Lee's Ultimate Advance—Meade—Advance of His Army—Gettysburg

—Battles—Lost Opportunity—More Waiting—Lee's Army Escapes, and Gen.

Meade Escapes the Highest Honor—Gettysburg and Vicksburg—Shenandoah

Valley—The Coast—Lieut.-Gen. Grant—Into the Wilderness—Its Battles—

Before Petersburg . * , 537

CHAPTER XXXIII.

THE POTOMAC — CAMPAIGN AND REGIMENTAL.

Major-General Hunter—Then and Now—The 8th Cavalry—General Farnsworth

—General Gamble—Col. Clendening—General Beveridge—Major Medill—The

Chaplains—The 12th Cavalry—Col. Voss—Col. Davis—Barker's Dragoons—

The 23d Infantry—General Mulligan—The 39th Infantry—Col. Osborn—Lieut-

Colonel Mann—Sturgis' Rifles , 548

CHAPTER XXXIV.

BI OGRAPHIC AL.

Major-General John Buford—The Cavalry Marshal—Colonel John A. Bross—

Colored Troops—In the Cedars—The 29th IT. S. C. T.—Obey Orders—The

Mine—Lieut. De Wolf—Lieut. Skinner—Young Durham 687

CHAPTER XXXV.

THE ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Its Appearance—Its Occupants—Its Contents—-Mather—Wyman—Grant—

Loomis—Adjutant-General Fuller—Biography—Judge—Adjutant—Governor

Yates' Testimony—Speaker—Resolutions of House—Economy 602

APPENDIX.

Tabular statement, showing the population, enrollments of 1863-4, and the totals

of all the quotas to 1864, and credits, deficits and excess of each county in the State

to July 1, 1864. 4 607

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

President ABRAHAM LINCOLN.
HOME OF MR. LINCOLN.
Hon. STEPHEN A. DOUGLAS.
Hon. RICHARD YATES.
Lieutenant-General IT. S. GRANT.
Brigadier-General W. H. L. WALLACE.
Major-general JNO. A. McCLERNAND.
Major-general JNO. A. LOGAN.
Brigadier-general T. E. G. RANSOM.
Colonel JAS. A. MULLIGAN.
Lieutenant-colonel JNO. A. BROSS.

PATEIOTISM OF ILLINOIS.

CHAPTER I.

INTRODUCTORY.

The StateExtent And BoundariesDecadesProductionsCivil WarFree And Slave LaborDemands Op SlaveryLincoln And DouglasSenatorial Contest—1860—Presidential ContestThreats Op Disunion—No Justification For Revolution—A. H. Stephens' SpeechMr. Lincoln's ViewsPowerless For EvilMr. BuchananCabinetScenes In CongressSouth Carolina Secedes —" Coercion"Lincoln's Policy ForeshadowedMajor AndersonFort MoulTrie And Fort SumterCommissionersGeneral Scott And Reinforcements—A TruceIllinois Congressional DelegationSummary Op Important FactsTermination Op The Buchanan Administration.

THE STATE OF ILLINOIS stretches from 36° 5Q' to 42° 30' north latitude, and is between 87° 35' and 91° 40'longitude. Its extent is truly imperial; its length from north to south being three hundred and eighty-eight, and its extreme breadth from east to west two hundred and twelve miles. Its head is as far north as Lowell, Massachusetts, and its foot farther south than Richmond, Virginia. Its area is 55,405 square miles, or 35,459,200 acres. Its northern boundary is Wisconsin; the north-eastern, Lake Michigan; eastern, Indiana, from which it is, in part, separated by the Wabash River; its southern, Kentucky and the Ohio River, while on its western line is the Mississippi River, across which are the States of Missouri and Iowa. It is divided into one hundred and one counties, which are dotted with villages, towns or cities.

Its growth has been very rapid, as the statement of its decennial periods from 1810 to 1860 shows:

TEAR. WHITES. FREE COLORED. SLAVES, TOTAL.

1810 11,501 613 168 12,282

1820 53,788 45*7 917 55,162

1830 155,061 1,637 747 157,445

1840 472,254 3,598 331 476,183

1850 846,034 5,436 851,470*

1860 1,704,323 7,628 1,711,951

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