The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volumen183

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A. Constable, 1896
 

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Página 160 - Ay me, I fondly dream ! Had ye been there — for what could that have done ? What could the Muse herself that Orpheus bore, The Muse herself, for her enchanting son, Whom universal nature did lament, When by the rout that made the hideous roar, His gory visage down the stream was sent, Down the swift Hebrus to the Lesbian shore...
Página 453 - Your sun, and moon, and skies, and hills, and lakes affect me no more, or scarcely come to me in more venerable characters, than as a gilded room with tapestry and tapers, where I might live with handsome visible objects. I consider the clouds above me but as a roof beautifully painted, but unable to satisfy the mind; and at last, like the pictures of the apartment of a connoisseur, unable to afford him any longer a pleasure. So fading upon me, from disuse, have been the beauties of Nature, as they...
Página 452 - Town ; the watchmen, drunken scenes, rattles ; life awake, if you awake, at all hours of the night ; the impossibility of being dull in Fleet Street ; the crowds, the very dirt and mud, the sun shining upon houses and pavements, the...
Página 37 - E non m' ancide Amor , e non mi sferra ; Né mi vuol vivo, né mi trae d'impaccio; Veggio senz'occhi ; e non ho lingua e grido; E bramo di perir , e cheggio aita; Ed ho in odio me stesso , ed amo altrui : Pascomi di dolor , piangendo rido ; Egualmente mi spiace morte e vita : In questo stato son , Donna , per vui...
Página 310 - ... those dark Passages. Now if we live, and go on thinking, we too shall explore them. He is a genius and superior to us, in so far as he can, more than we, make discoveries and shed a light in them. Here I must think Wordsworth is deeper than Milton, though I think it has depended more upon the general and gregarious advance of intellect, than individual greatness of Mind.
Página 453 - Street; the crowds, the very dirt and mud, the sun shining upon houses and pavements, the print shops, the old bookstalls, parsons cheapening books, coffee-houses, steams of soups from kitchens, the pantomimes— London itself a pantomime and a masquerade — all these things work themselves into my mind, and feed me, without a power of satiating me. The wonder of these sights impels me into night-walks about her crowded streets, and I often shed tears in the motley Strand from fulness of joy at...
Página 498 - I fled Him, down the nights and down the days; I fled Him, down the arches of the years; I fled Him, down the labyrinthine ways Of my own mind; and in the mist of tears I hid from Him, and under running laughter. Up vistaed hopes I sped; And shot, precipitated, Adown Titanic glooms of chasmed fears, From those strong Feet that followed, followed after. But with unhurrying chase, And unperturbed pace, Deliberate speed, majestic instancy, They beat — and a Voice beat More instant than the Feet —...
Página 498 - Lest, having Him, I must have naught beside) ; But, if one little casement parted wide, The gust of His approach would clash it to. Fear wist not to evade, as Love wist to pursue.
Página 380 - Could I have rewarded these services I would not now call upon my country ; but as that has not been in my power, I leave Emma, Lady Hamilton therefore a legacy to my king and country, that they will give her an ample provision to maintain her rank in life.
Página 452 - I have passed all my days in London, until I have formed as many and intense local attachments as any of you mountaineers can have done with dead Nature. The lighted shops of the Strand and Fleet Street ; the innumerable trades, tradesmen, and customers, coaches...

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