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place upon a sure foundation the peace of our communities, and the freedom and dignity of labor.

The appointment of citizens to the various executive and judicial offices of the government is, perhaps, the most difficult of all duties which the constitution has imposed upon the Executive. The convention wisely demands that Congress shall co-operate with the executive departments in placing the civil service on a better basis. Experience has proved that, with our frequent changes of administration, no system of reform can be made effective and permanent without the aid of legislation. Appointments to the military and naval service are so regulated by law and custom, as to leave but little ground for complaint. It may not be wise to make similar regulations by law for the civil service; but, without invading the authority or necessary discretion of the Executive, Congress should devise a method that will determine the tenure of office, and greatly reduce the uncertainty which makes that service so uncertain and unsatisfactory. Without depriving any officer of his rights as a citizen, the government should require him to discharge all his official duties with intelligence, efficiency and faithfulness. To select wisely, from our vast population, those who are best fitted for the many offices to be filled, requires an acquaintance far beyond the range of any one man. The Executive should, therefore, seek and receive the information and assistance of those whose knowledge of the communities, in which the duties are to be performed, best qualifies them to aid in making the wisest choice.

The doctrines announced in the Chicago convention, are not the temporary devices of a party to attract votes and carry an election ; they are deliberate convictions, resulting from a careful study of the spirit of our institutions, the events of our history and the best impulses of our people. In my judgment, these principles should control the legislation and administration of the government. In any event, they will guide my conduct until experience points out a better way. If elected, it will be my purpose to enforce strict obedience to the constitution and the laws, and to promote, as best I may, the interest and honor of the whole country, relying for support upon the wisdom of Congress, the intelligence and patriotism of the people and the favor of God.

With great respect, I am
Very truly yours,

J. A. GARFIELD.
To Hon. GEORGE F. HOAR,

Chairman of the Committee.

Awaiting the future events in this great mans career with intense interest, and feeling that whatever may be his experience or success hereafter, * the past at least is secure;” and that his example as a boy, scholar, teacher, general and statesman, hich is now so fortunately brought to the attention

the people, is a valuable heritage to bequeath to the vo

Youth of our land, we lay down this pen, and turn

to other tasks.

“ Lives of great men all remind us

We can make ourlives sublime.

[graphic]

SKETCH OF THE LIFE

GEN. CHESTER A. ARTHUR

OF NEW YORK.

BIRTH IN VERMONT. - SON OF A BAPTIST CLERGYMAN. — HIS FATHER'S

LITERARY WORK. – DIFFICULTIES ENCOUNTERED IN HIS EARLY
LIFE. - GENERAL ARTHUR'S CHILDHOOD. - HIS STUDIES, — HIS
SPORTS.- PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE. — ENTERING COLLEGE VERY
YOUNG. - TEACHING SCHOOL. -STUDYING LAW. - SEARCHING FOR

RACTICE, SETTLEMENT IN NEW YORK. THE CELE-
BRATED SLAVE CASES. - CHAMPION OF THE OPPRESSED. — HIS PUB-
LIC SERVICES. — PRESENT BUSINESS AND POSITION.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR was born, October 5, 1830 in a small town in Franklin County, Vermont. His father, Rev. William Arthur, D.D., was a somewhat noted Baptist clergyman, and was a very learned man. It is said, by those who remember him, that he possessed an unusual knowledge of general literature, and was a ready and entertaining writer, on matters of public interest. As a theologian, he was an unshaken believer in his creed, and was one of its stoutest and most persistent champions. His success and chief merit, as a preacher, lay in his wonderful memory, and his talent as a writer, rather

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