A History of the People of the United St

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Cosimo, Inc., 2006 M06 1 - 604 páginas
Violence, insolence, and law-breaking were not frequent along the whole border. Five open boats, full of potash, attempted to make the run from Fort Niagara to Canada, and, despite the troops and the Collector, three succeeded. On Salmon river, in Oneida County, the crew of a revenue cutter behave so insolently that the people rose, seized them, and put them into the jail. At Lewiston twenty men came over from Canada and carried off a quantity of flour by force. -from "The Long Embargo" A bestseller when it was first published in 1883, this third volume of historian John Bach McMaster's magnum opus is a lively history of the United States that is as entertaining as it is informative. Eventually stretching to eight volumes, McMaster's epic was original in its emphasis on social and economic conditions as deciding factors in shaping a nation's culture: in addition to the words and actions of great men and the outcomes of significant skirmishes and battles, McMaster indulges his obsession with fascinating trivia, from how the booming American economy led to an epidemic of desertions of British soldiers to high-paying merchantman jobs to the great kerfuffle over the importation of Merino sheep from Portugal. Volume 3, spanning the years 1803 through 1812, is a compulsively readable account of the birth pangs of the new nation, and covers such intriguing and unlikely topics as the vagaries of voting laws in some states that enfranchised women and nonwhites, the dangerous and unguarded state of the Western frontier, early battles over slavery and freedom of the press, and more. OF INTEREST TO: readers of American history AUTHOR BIO: American historian JOHN BACH MCMASTER (1852-1932) taught atthe Wharton School of Finance and Economy at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, from 1883 to 1919. He also wrote Benjamin Franklin as a Man of Letters (1887) and A School History of the United States (1897), which became a definitive textbook.

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Contenido

Pickering and The Logan Act 288288
285
OgrabmeGobarem and Mobrage
291
A proclamation forbidding it
298
Embargobreaking on the lakes 304806
307
Napoleon seizes Spain and Portugal 309 810
310
Revolt against the caucus 815
318
Gallatin calls for war 821
324
Governor Trumbull refuses the aid of his militia
331

Secession leaders encouraged
60
No help from England
61
of conspiracy
67
Mourning for Hamilton in New York and elsewhere 68
68
Burr goes down the Ohio and Mississippi
73
Burr arrested in Richmond
79
Trial of Burr 8388
83
Randolph proposes that the army construct public works 487
86
The landbounty of 1776
89
New York cession
95
Government of the Northwest Territory organized 112 118
100
Formation of new States 101
101
Geographers line
109
Criminal code of the Northwest 113
113
Areas to be sold and manner of selling debated 310120
120
Yazoo land companies Rattlesnake money
127
State of Ohio formed 188185
133
Michigan Territory
139
Exploration of Pike 144
145
Constitution of New Jersey 150
151
Judge Addison 1541S?
160
Midnight judges 164165
165
Trial of Judge Pickering 172
172
Chase acquitted
181
Republican caucus
187
Connecticut without a constitution 190192
193
CHAPTEK XVIII
200
Loss of the Intrepid and her crew
206
Seizure of Texas considered
209
Two million dollars voted to buy the Floridas 21
215
French decrees and English orders
221
Effect of these decisions
227
Pamphlets on the commercial troubles of 1806 Kote 235
235
British impressment of American seamen 240245
242
Instructions to Commissioners Monroe and Pinkney
248
Of Lieutenant Flintoph of the Pogge 284
256
Leopard and Chesapeake 267289
261
The proclamation disregarded
267
Copenhagen bombarded by the British
273
CHAPTER XIX
279
Repeal of the embargo moved
337
Agreement concerning intercourse with Great Britain 842
345
Quarrel with Jackson 851358
351
It passes the House and is lost in conference
360
Decrees of Berlin and Milan recalled
368
Occupation of East Florida authorized 874
378
Petitions for recharter 884 888
387
Federalist comments
388
Nonimportation Bill recommitted
393
Struggle with the minority in the House 898397
397
The President and the Little Belt 402406
403
Pretended repeal of the decrees
409
Staylaws in the South 416417
416
Faneuil Hall resolutions
422
His speech concerning West Florida 429
429
Randolph opposes war 434
435
Use of the militia outside the United States
438
Attitude of the Federalists toward the war
444
An embargo for ninety days laid 480
451
The vote on war 487 488
458
Lack of national unity
465
Chesapeake and Delaware Canal 471473
471
Old canal projects revived
478
Boatbuiiding at Pittsburg Ohio River towns
484
The bill becomes law
487
The Clermont
490
Encouragement to manufacturers
496
Action of State Legislatures 602608
506
Schedule of the Nashville doctors
510
Tecumthes Southern tour 688
514
Demand for slaves increased by the cottongin 815
517
Petition of the Virginia soldiers 624
524
He obtains an extension of the Indiana Territory 528 629
531
Smuggling in East Florida
537
Condition of the Atlantic seaboard and the Southern frontier 642
546
Federalists condemn the declaration of war 649 850
552
Hulls sloth and Brocks energy
558
Republican criticism of Great Britain 858855
576
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Página 34 - Louisiana, with the same extent that it now has in the hands of Spain, and that it had when France possessed it, and such as it should he after the treaties subsequently entered into between Spain and other States.
Página 137 - June next, all that part of the Indiana Territory which lies north of a line drawn east from the southerly bend, or extreme, of Lake Michigan, until it shall intersect Lake Erie, and east of a line drawn from the said southerly bend through the middle of said lake to its northern extremity, and thence due north to the northern boundary of the United States, shall, for the purpose of temporary government, constitute a separate Territory, and be called Michigan.
Página 434 - I am now about to advance is at war, I know, with sentiments of the gentleman from Virginia: I am willing to receive the Canadians as adopted brethren; it will have beneficial political effects; it will preserve the equilibrium of the Government. When Louisiana shall be fully peopled, the Northern States will lose their power; they will be at the discretion of others; they can be depressed at pleasure, and then this Union might be endangered — I therefore feel anxious not only to add the Floridas...
Página 85 - That if any person shall, within the territory or jurisdiction of the United States, begin or set on foot, or provide or prepare the means for any military expedition or enterprise...
Página 55 - I have just received an offer from Mr. Burr, the actual Vice-president of the United States (which position he is about to resign) to lend his assistance to his Majesty's government in any manner in which they may think fit to employ him, particularly in endeavoring to effect a separation of the western part of the United States from that which lies between the Atlantic and the mountains, in its whole extent.
Página 85 - We of the jury say that Aaron Burr is not proved to be guilty under this indictment by any evidence submitted to us. We therefore find him not guilty.
Página 388 - What is the nature of this government? It is emphatically federal, vested with an aggregate of specified powers for general purposes, conceded by existing sovereignties, who have themselves retained what is not so conceded. It is said that there are cases in which it must act on implied powers. This is not controverted, but the implication must be necessary, and obviously flow from the enumerated power with which it is allied. The power to charter companies is not specified in the grant, and I contend...

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