Principles of ethics

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D. Appleton, 1898

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Página 52 - Act only on that maxim whereby thou canst at the same time will that it should become a universal law.
Página 46 - has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other...
Página 53 - Commentaries remarks, that this law of Nature being coeval with mankind, and dictated by God himself, is of course superior in obligation to any other. It is binding over all the globe, in all countries and at all times; no human laws are of any validity if contrary to this, and such of them as are valid, derive all their force, and all their validity, and all their authority, mediately and immediately, from this original...
Página 95 - The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his. Whatsoever, then, he removes out of the state that nature hath provided and left it in, he hath mixed his labour with, and joined to it something that is his own, and thereby makes it his property.
Página 444 - It is not for nothing that he has in him these sympathies with some principles and repugnance to others. He, with all his capacities and aspirations, and beliefs, is not an accident, but a product of the time.
Página 52 - I know nothing that could, in this view, be said better, than " do unto others as ye would that others should do unto you...
Página 94 - Though the earth and all inferior creatures be common to all men, yet every man has a property in his own person. This nobody has any right to but himself. The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his.
Página 461 - We need not, however, rest satisfied with an induction from these instances yielded by the essential vital functions ; for it is an inevitable deduction from the hypothesis of Evolution, that races of sentient creatures could have come into existence under no other conditions.
Página 53 - the law of nature," because its general precepts are essentially adapted to promote the happiness of man, as long as he remains a being of the same nature with which he is at present endowed, or, in other words, as long as he continues to be man, in all the variety of times, places, and circumstances, in which he has been known, or can be imagined to exist ; because it is discoverable by natural reason...
Página 41 - That principle is a mere form of words without rational signification, unless one person's happiness, supposed equal in degree (with the proper allowance made for kind), is counted for exactly as much as another's. Those conditions heing supplied, Bentham's dictum, ' everybody to count for one, nobody for more than one...

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