Speech of Mr. Truman Smith of Conn. on the French Spoliation Claims: Delivered in the Senate of the United States, January 16 & 17, 1851

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Jno. T. Towers, 1851 - 32 páginas
 

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Página 13 - The great rule of conduct for us in regard to foreign nations is, in extending our commercial relations to have with them as little political connection as possible.
Página 5 - ... to trade with the same liberty and security from the places, ports and havens of those who are enemies of both, or either party, without any opposition or disturbance whatsoever, not only directly from the places of the enemy aforementioned to neutral places, but also from one place belonging to an enemy to another place belonging to an enemy, whether they be under the jurisdiction of the same prince, or under several.
Página 11 - Treaty of peace; and his most Christian Majesty guarantees on his part to the United States their liberty, sovereignty and independence absolute and unlimited as well in matters of government as commerce and also their possessions and the additions or conquests that their Confederation may obtain during the War from any of the dominions now or heretofore possessed by Great Britain in North America...
Página 5 - ... although the whole lading, or any part thereof, should appertain to the enemies of either, contraband goods being always excepted. It is also agreed, in like manner, that the same liberty be extended to persons who are on board a free ship, with this effect — that although they be enemies to both or either party, they are not to be taken out of that free ship, unless they are officers or soldiers, and in the actual service of the enemies.
Página 5 - It shall be lawful for all and singular the Subjects of the most Christian King and the Citizens People and Inhabitants of the said United States to sail with their Ships with all manner of Liberty...
Página 13 - Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation? Why quit our own to stand upon foreign ground. Why, by interweaving our destiny with that of any part of Europe, entangle our peace and prosperity in the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humor or caprice?
Página 14 - It shall not be lawful for any foreign privateers (not being subjects or citizens of either of the said parties) who have commissions from any other Prince or State in enmity with either nation to arm their ships in the ports of either of the said parties, nor to sell what they have taken...
Página 14 - Nothing in this treaty contained shall, however, be construed or operate contrary to former and existing public treaties with other sovereigns or States. But 153 the two parties agree that while they continue in amity neither of them will in future make any treaty that shall be inconsistent with this or the preceding article.
Página 13 - Europe has a set of primary interests which to us have none or a very remote relation. Hence she must be engaged in frequent controversies, the causes of which are essentially foreign to our concerns. Hence, therefore, it must be unwise in us to implicate ourselves by artificial ties in the ordinary vicissitudes of her politics, or the ordinary combinations and collisions of her friendships or enmities.
Página 14 - No shelter or refuge shall be given in their ports to such as have made a prize upon the subjects or citizens of either of the said parties ; but if forced by stress of weather, or the dangers of the sea, to enter therein, particular care shall be taken to hasten their departure, and to cause them to retire as soon as possible.

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