Publications of the Modern Language Association of America, Volumen36

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Modern Language Association of America, 1921
Vols. for 1921-1969 include annual bibliography, called 1921-1955, American bibliography; 1956-1963, Annual bibliography; 1964-1968, MLA international bibliography.

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Página 115 - She hurried at his words, beset with fears, For there were sleeping dragons all around, At glaring watch, perhaps, with ready spears — Down the wide stairs a darkling way they found.
Página 107 - ST. AGNES' EVE— Ah, bitter chill it was ! The owl, for all his feathers, was a-cold ; The hare limped trembling through the frozen grass, And silent was the flock in woolly fold...
Página 110 - Of fruits, and flowers, and bunches of knot-grass, And diamonded with panes of quaint device...
Página 113 - I curse not, for my heart is lost in thine, Though thou forsakest a deceived thing; — A dove forlorn and lost with sick unpruned wing.
Página 112 - The blisses of her dream so pure and deep. At which fair Madeline began to weep, And moan forth witless words with many a sigh; While still her gaze on Porphyro would keep; Who knelt, with joined hands and piteous eye, Fearing to move or speak, she looked so dreamingly. xxxv "Ah, Porphyro!
Página 113 - but even now Thy voice was at sweet tremble in mine ear, Made tuneable with every sweetest vow ; And those sad eyes were spiritual and clear : How changed thou art ! how pallid, chill, and drear ! Give me that voice again, my Porphyro, Those looks immortal, those complainings dear ! Oh leave me not in this eternal woe, For if thou diest, my Love, I know not where to go.
Página 29 - O goodness infinite, goodness immense ! That all this good of evil shall produce, And evil turn to good ; more wonderful Than that which by creation first brought forth Light out of darkness ! Full of doubt I stand, Whether I should repent me now of sin By me done, and occasion'd, or rejoice Much more, that much more good thereof shall spring ; To God more glory, more good-will to men From God, and over wrath grace shall abound.
Página 10 - Man disobeying, Disloyal, breaks his fealty, and sins Against the high supremacy of Heaven, Affecting Godhead, and, so losing all, To expiate his treason hath naught left, But, to destruction sacred and devote, He with his whole posterity must die; — Die he or Justice must; unless for him Some other, able, and as willing, pay The rigid satisfaction, death for death.
Página 310 - Shepherd, I take thy word, And trust thy honest offer'd courtesy, Which oft is sooner found in lowly sheds With smoky rafters, than in tapestry halls And courts of princes, where it first was named, And yet is most pretended.
Página 118 - The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its faculties to each other, according to their relative worth and dignity. He diffuses a tone and spirit of unity that blends, and (as it were) fuses, each into each, by that synthetic and magical power to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination.

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