Greek and Roman Actors: Aspects of an Ancient Profession

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Cambridge University Press, 2002 M09 26 - 510 páginas
This series of twenty complementary essays by experts in the field explores the art, social status, reputation and image of the ancient actor in the Greek and Roman worlds, from the sixth century B.C. to the Byzantine period. It covers tragedy, comedy, mime and pantomime and offers a full overview of the most important ancient evidence. In some essays new questions are asked, and in others, completely new evidence is offered. Numerous illustrations are included and all Greek and Latin passages are translated.
 

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Contenido

The singing actors of antiquity
3
The musicians among the actors
39
The use of the body by actors in tragedy and satyrplay
69
Towards a reconstruction of performance style
93
the limits of realism
127
Looking for the actors art in Aristotle
148
Acting action and words in New Comedy
165
the ideology of Hellenistic performance
189
new evidence from Ephesus
254
Female entertainers in late antiquity
282
evidence and problems
304
Actor as icon
327
text and performance in
342
Orator andet actor
362
The subjectivity of Greek performance
395
Glossary
435

Nothing to do with the technītai of Dionysus?
209
IO Actors and actormanagers at Rome in the time
225
The masks on the propylon of the Sebasteion
238

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Acerca del autor (2002)

Pat Easterling is Emeritus Regius Professor of Greek at the University of Cambridge, a Fellow of Newnham College and a Fellow of the British Academy. She was Professor of Greek at University College London from 1987 to 1994, and has also served as President of the Classical Association (1989/1990) and the Hellenic Society (1996-1999). In addition to serving as General Editor of the Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics ever since its foundation over thirty years ago, she has published an edition within this series of Sophocles' Trachiniae (1982), co-edited, with B. M. W. Knox, Volume 1 of the Cambridge History of Classical Literature (1985) and edited The Cambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy (1997). She is currently working on an edition of Sophocles' Oedipus at Colonus for the Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics series.

Edith Hall is Professor of Greek Cultural History at the University of Durham and has previously taught at the Universities of Cambridge, Reading and Oxford. She is Co-Director of the Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama at the University of Oxford and author of Inventing the Barbarian (1989), editor of Aeschylus' Persians (1996) and co-editor of Medea in Performance (2000).

Edith Hall is Professor of Greek Cultural History at the University of Durham and has previously taught at the Universities of Cambridge, Reading and Oxford. She is Co-Director of the Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama at the University of Oxford and author of Inventing the Barbarian (1989), editor of Aeschylus' Persians (1996) and co-editor of Medea in Performance (2000).

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