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BENTLEY'S
MISCE L L A N Y.

AUGUST, 1842.

Contents.

Page

107 118

119

A WINTER'S JOURNEY TO GEORGIA, U. 8. BY MRS. BUTLER
THE HOUR OF VIGILS, . . BY WILLIAM JONES
DON'T BE TOO SURE; OR, DISASTERS OF A MARRIAGE DAY, .
STANZAS,

BY K. I.
A VISIT TO MALTA,

BY RICHARD JOHNS BALLAD—MY NORA!

BY T. J. OUSELEY THE NIGHT-CAB

HOME,

130 137 138 141 142 150 151

172

BY WILLIAM JONES POPE JOAN, .

BY R. B. PEAKE SONG,

BY EDWARD KENEALY THE REVENGE,

BY E. V. RIPPINGILLE
HOURS IN HINDOSTAN, -THE ADJUTANT-THE TANK-THE

SNAKE-CHARMER-A SUTTEE-A BLUE-JACKET'S AD-
VENTURE

BY J. R. ADDISON
RICHARD SAVAGE: A ROMANCE OF REAL LIFE. EDITED,
WITH OCCASIONAL NOTES, BY CHARLES WHITEHEAD,

ILLUSTRATED BY JOHN LEACH THE PHILOSOPHY OF ORATORY,

EDITED BY ALFRED CROWQUILL NETLEY ABBEY

. BY THOMAS INGOLDSBY, ESQ. FIDELITY AND SAGACITY OF A DOG

185

196 201 205 208

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TO PHILLIS,

208

A WINTER'S JOURNEY TO GEORGIA, U. S.

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I had been very much struck with the appearance of the horses we passed occasionally in enclosures, or gathered round some lonely roadside pine-wood shop, or post-office, fastened to trees in the surrounding forest, and waiting for their riders. I had been always led to expect a great improvement in the breed of horses as we went southward, and the appearance of those I saw on the road was certainly in favour of the claim. They were generally small, but in good condition, and remarkably well made. They seemed to be tolerably well cared for, too; and those which we saw ca parisoned were ornamented with gay saddle-cloths, and rather a superfiuity of trappings for civil animals.

At our dismal halt in the woods, while waiting for the railroad cars, among our other spectators was a woman on horseback. Her steed was uncomnionly pretty and well-limbed; but her costume was quite the most eccentric that can be imagined, accustomed as I am to the not over-rigid equestrian equipments of the northern villages. But the North-Carolinian damsel beat all Yankee girls I ever saw hollow, in the glorious contempt she exhibited for the external fitness of things in her exceeding short skirts and huge sun-bonnet.

After our departure from Colonel — 's, we travelled all night in a railroad car. One of my children slept in my lap, the other on the narrow seat opposite to me, from which she was jolted off every quarter of an hour by the uneasy motion of the carriage, and the checks and stops of the engine, which was out of order. The car, though full of people, was heated with a stove, and every time this was replenished with coals we were almost suffocated with the clouds of bituminous smoke which filled the carriage. Five hours, they said, was the usual time consumed in this part of the journey; but we were the whole mortal night upon that uneasy railroad, and it was five o'clock in the morning before we reached Wilmington, North Carolina. When the cars stopped it was yet quite dark, and most bitterly cold; nevertheless, the distance from the railroad to the only inn where we could be accommodated was nothing less than a mile; and, weary and worn-out, we trudged along, the poor little sleeping children carried by their still more unfortunate, sleepless nurses, and so by the cheerless winter starlight we walked along the brink of the Cape Fear river, to seek where we might lay our heads. We were shown into a room without window-curtains or shutters, the windows, as usual, not half shut, and wholly incapable of shutting. Here, when I asked if we could have some tea, (having fasted the whole previous day, with the exception of Colonel 's bountiful supper,) the host pleasantly informed us, that the public breakfast would not be ready for some hours yet.' I really could not help once again protesting against the abominable tyranny of the travelling many over the travelling few in this free country. It is supposed impossible that any individual can hunger, thirst, or desire sleep at any other than the public hours,'—the con. sequence is, that let one arrive starved at an inn, one can obtain nothing till such hours when those who are not starving desire to eat;— and if one is foredone with travel, weary, and wanting rest, the pitiless

VOL. X.

15

alarum bell, calling those who may have had twelve hours' sleep from their beds, must startle those who have only just closed their eyes for the first time, perhaps, for three nights,-as if the whole travelling community were again at boarding-school, and as if a private summons by the boots or chambermaid to each apartment would not answer the same purpose.

By the way, in New York, at the Astor House, they are beginning to understand a little better the comfortable accommnodation of travellers; and, but for the horrible gong, which the national taste for herding to eat renders necessary, one may live as one pleases there, provided one pays as they please. A Christianly house it is, and much to be commended therefor. We were, however, so utterly exhausted, that waiting for the public appetite was out of the question; and, by dint of much supplication, we at length obtained some breakfast. When, however, we stated that we had not been in bed for two successive nights, and asked to be shown to our rooms, the same gentleman, our host, an exceedingly pleasant person, informed us that our chamber was prepared,-adding, with the most facetious familiarity, when I exclaimed our chamber!' (we were three, and two children,)

Oh! madam, I presume you will have no objection to sleeping with your infant,' (he lumped the two into one); and these two ladies' (Miss and will sleep together. I dare say they have done it a hundred times.

This unbeard-of proposition, and the man's cool impudence in making it, so astonished me, that I could hardly speak. At last, however, I found words to inform him that none of our party were in the habit of sleeping with each other, and that the arrangement was such as we were not at all inclined to submit to. The gentleman, apparently very much surprised at our singular habits, said, “Oh! he didn't know that the ladies were not acquainted,' (as if, forsooth, one went to bed with all one's acquaintances !) .but that he had but that one room in the ladies' part of the house.'

Miss — immediately professed her readiness to take one in the gentlemen's part of the house,' when it appeared that there was none vacant there which had a fire-place in it. As the morning was intensely cold, this could not be thought of. I could not take shelter in my husband's room; for he, according to this decent and comfortable mode of lodging travellers, had another man to share it with him.

To our common dormitory we therefore repaired, as it was impossible that we could any of us go any longer without rest. I established

and the two babies in the largest bed; poor Miss — betook herself to a sort of curtainless cot that stood in one corner; and I laid myself down on a mattress on the floor; and we soon all forgot the conveniences of a Wilmington hotel in the supreme convenience of sleep.

It was bright morning, and drawing towards one o'clock, when we rose up, and were presently summoned to the public dinner.' The dirt and discomfort of everything was so intolerable, that I could not eat; and having obtained some tea, we set forth to walk to the steamboat, Governor Dudley, which was to convey us to Charleston. The mid-day sun look from Wilmington some of the desolateness which the wintry darkness of the morning gave it; yet it looked to me like a place I could sooner die than live in,-ruinous, yet not old, -poor, dirty, and mean, and unvenerable in its poverty and decay. The river

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