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General Grant's Order for the Protection of Cit-
izens.
HEADQUARTERs of THE ARMY,

ADJUTANT GENERAL's Office,
WASHINGTON, July 6, 1866.

[General Orders, No. 44.]
Department, district, and post commanders in the States
lately in rebellion are hereby directed to arrest all persons
who have or may hereafter be charged with the com-
mission of crimes and offences against officers, agents, citi-
zens, and inhabitants of the United States, irrespective of
color, in cases where the civil authorities have failed, neg-
lected, or are unable to arrest and bring such parties to
trial, and to detain them in military confinement until such
time as a proper judicial tribunal may be ready and willing
to try them.'
A strict and prompt enforcement of this order is required.
By command of Lieutenant General Grant: -
E. D. Townsend,
Assistant Adjutant General.

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Unconditional Union Convention of Maryland,
June 6, 1866, -

Resolved, That the registered loyal voters of Maryland will listen to no propositions to repeal or modify the registry law, which was enacted in conformity with the provisions of the constitution, and must remain in full force until such time as the registered voters of the State shall decree that the organic law shall be changed. 2. That the loyal people of the State are “the legitimate guardians depositaries of its power,” and that the disloyal “have no just right to complain of the hardships of a law which they have themselves deliberately provoked.” 3. That it is the opinion of this convention, that if disloyal persons should be registered, it will be the duty of judges of election to administer the oath prescribed by the constitution to all whose loyalty may be challenged, and, in the language of the constitution, to “carefully exclude from voting” all that are disqualified. 4. That we cordially endorse the reconstruction policy of Congress, which excludes the leaders of the rebellion from all offices of profit or trust under the National Government, and places the basis of representation on the only just and honest principle, and that a white man in Virginia or South Carolina should have just as much representative power, and no more, than a white man in Pennsylvania or Ohio. 5. That the question of negro suffrage is not an issue in the State of Maryland, but is raised by the enemies of the Union party for the purpose of dividing and distracting it, and by this means to ultimately enable rebels to vote. 6. That we are pledged to the maintenance of the present constitution of Maryland, which expressly and emphatically prohibits both rebel suffrage and negro suffrage, and we are equally determined to uphold the registry law, which disfranchises rebels and excludes negroes from voting, and have no desire or intention of rescinding or abolishing either the constitution or the registry law. 7. That we warn the Union men of Maryland “that no Union man, high or low, should court the favor of traitors, as they can never win it—from the first they have held him as their enemy, and to the last they will be his; and that they should eschew petty rivalries, frivolous jealousies, and self-seeking cabals; so shall they save themselves fall. ing one by one, an unpitied sacrifice, in a contemptible struggle.” The vote upon the adoption of each resolution was unanimous, with the exception of the sixth resolution, upon which a division was called, and the result showed 54 yeas to 14 nays. The resolutions were then read as a whole, and adopted unanimously as the utterance of the Convention.

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the citizen must be left to the States alone, and under Such | regulations as the respective States choose voluntarily to prescribe.” - We have seen this doctrine of State sovereignty carried out in its practical results until all authority in Congress was denied, the Union temporarily destroyed, the constitu. tional rights of the citizen of the South nearly annihilated, and the land desolated by civil war. The time has come when the restructure of Southern State government must be laid on constitutional principles, or the despotism, grown up under an atrocious leadership, be permitted to remain. We know of no other plan that that Congress, under its constitutional powers, shall now exercise its authority to establish the principle whereby protection is made coextensive with citizenship. We maintain that no State, either by its organic law of legislation can make transgression on the rights of the citizen legitimate. We demand and ask you to concur in demanding protection to every citizen of the great Republic on the basis of equality before the law ;- and further, that no State government should be recognized as legitimate under the Constitution in so far as it does not by its organic law make impartial protection full and complete. Under the doctrine of “State sovereignty.” with rebels in the foreground, controlling Southern legislatures, and embittered by disappointment in their schemes to destroy the Union, there will be no safety for the loyal element of the South. Our reliance for protection is now on Congress, and the great Union party that has stood and is standing by our nationality, by the constitutional rights of the citizen, and by the beneficent principles of the government. For the purpose of bringing the loyal Unionists of the South into conjunctive action with the true friends of republican government in the North, we invite you to send delegates in goodly numbers from all the Southern States, including Missouri, Kentucky, West Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware, to meet at Independence Hall, in the city of Philadelphia, on the first Monday of September next. It is proposed that we should meet at that time to recommend measures for the establishment of such government in the South as accords with and protects the rights of all citizens. We trust this gall will be responded to by numerous delegations of such as represent the true loyalty of the South. That kind of government which gives full protection to all rights of the citizen, such as our fathers intended, we claim as our birthright. Either the lovers of constitutional liberty must rule the nation or rebels and their sympathizers be permitted to misrule it. Shall loyalty or disloyalty have the keeping of the destinies of the nation? Let the responses to this call which is now in circulation for signatures, and is being numerously signed, answer. Notice is given that gentlemen at a distance can have their names attached to it by sending a request by letter directed to D. W. Bingham, Esq., of Washington, D.C. . Tennessee................W. B. Stokes, Jos. S. FowleR, JAMES GETTYS. .A. J. HAMILTON, GEO. W. PASCHAL, * LORENzo SHERWOOD, C. B. SABIN. G. W. Ashburn, HENRY G. Cole, . W. McCLURG, OHN R. KEL80, J. F. BENJAMIN, GEO. W. ANDERSON. John B. TRoTH, J. M. STEwART, WM. N. BERKLEY, ALLEN C. HARMON, “LEwis McKENZIE, J. W. HunNICUTT, John C. UNDERWOOD, BURNHAM WARDWELL, ALEx. M. DAVIS. ........BYRON LAFLIN, DANIEL R. GOODLOE. .GEORGE REESE, D. H. BINGHAM, M. R. SAFFold, J. H. LARCOMBE,

Teacas....

Georgia

Missouri ..

North Carolina
Alabama.

WASHINGTON, July 4, 1866.

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XIII.—Interesting Figures chiefly from the Census of 1800, bearing on Representation.

- . According
Apportion. Based on Accordi
m White Free Aggregate or white Males o' ... t. is is to whole Agog
STATES.* Population. Colored. Slaves. Population. tive Popu- over 20. Males over Wote of 1860. der Census Slave Pop- populaton, to White
lation. 20. - including | Suffrage.
- of 1860. ulation.
Colored.
• California... #358,110 362,196 206,442 2,339 108,840 3 |...... 3 7
Connecticut ,504 460,147 127,996 2,091 77,246. 4 4 4
Illinois 1,704,291 1,711,951 439,503 1,753 339,693 14 13 15
Indiana 1,338,710 1,350,428 316,804 2,565 272,143 11 10 11
Iowa 673,770 674,913 164,535 290 125,331 6 5 6
Kansas 106,300 107,206 31,037 149 }...... ------------ 1 1. 1.
Maine....................................................... 623,947 628,279 167,724 362 97,918 5 5 6
*. ts 1,221,432 1,231,066 339,086 2,512 169,175 10 9 12
Michigan 736,142 749,113 200,474 1,918 154,747 6 6 7
Minnesota 169,395 172,023 48,186 65 34,799 2 2 2
New Hamps 325,579 326,073 ,95. 149 65,953 3. 3 3
New Jersey... 646,699 672,027 167,441 6,291 121,125 5 5 6
New York.... 3,831,500 3,880,735 | 1,027,3 12,989 675,156 31 29 35
Ohio 2,302,808 2,339,511 562,901 8,770 2,441 19 18 19
Oregon......... 52,160 52.465 17,736 53 14,410 1 |.. 1 1
Pennsylvania 2,849,529 2,906,215 702,316 13,631 476,442 . 24 22 24
Rhode Island 170,649 174,620° 46,417 1,023 19,951 2 .. 2 2
Vermont.... , 314,369 315,098 87,462 194 42,844 3 3 3
Wisconsin.. 773,693 775,881 775,881 198.914 353 152,170 6 6 7
-> 18,653,776 18,907,753 18,889,947 || 4,944,272 57,497 || 3,393,392 156 147 171
Alabama.................................... --------------------- 526,271 964,201 700,169 118,589 96,458 || > 90,357 6 7 4
Arkansas 324,143 435,450 301,004 73,963 25,044 54,053 3 3. 3
Delaware......................... ............ -------------- 90.589 112,216 111,496 22,429 4,679 16,0.9 1 !.. - 1 1
Florida 77,747 140,424 115,726 18,687 14,315 14 347 J |.. - 1 1
Georgia 591,550 1,057,286 872,406 132,479 97,170 106,365 7 2 8 5
Rentucky... 919,484 1,155,684 | 1,065,490 217,883 50,442 146,216 9 1 9 8
Louisiana 357,456 708,002 575,311 101,499 101,814 50,510 5 2 6 4
Maryland 515,918 687,049 652,173 128,371 38,039 92.502 5 l............... 5 5
Mississipp 353,899 791,305 616,652 85,838 113,828 60,120 5 2 6 3
Missouri.. 1,063,489 - 1,182,012 || 1,136,039 268,262 21,872 165,518 9 1 9 9
North Carolina. 629,942 30,463 331,059 992,622 860,197 143,443 74,356 47,691 7 2 8 5
South Carolina. 291.300 9,914 402,406 703,708 542,745 68,154 87,781 35,000 4 2 5 2
826,722 7,300 275,719 1,109,801 999,513 180,470 56,770 45,333 8 1 9 -- 7
420,891 355 182,566 604,215 531,188 109.625 38,704 62,086 4 1 5 4
1,047,299 58,042 490,865 1,596,318 1,399,972 245,683 123,613 167,223 11 2 12 9
8,036,700 250,787 3.950,511 12,240,293 10,660.081 1924,375 944 885 1.263,260 85 18 94 70 -
Grand Total. 476,636 || 3.950.531 || 31.148 UTS 29.550,028 || 6,858.047 | 1,002,382 || 4,656,652 | – 241_ 18 241 241
Representative Ratio.................................................I.I.I.I.I.I.I.I. I27,000......... 133,700T 29,300

* Nevada admitted since, with one Representative—makin

f Including Asiatics.

† Estimated. Debt bearing Coin Interest $1,105,825,191. Debt bearing Currency Interest 1,147,222.2% Matured Debt not presented for payment 4,900,42 Debt bearing no Interest.—U.S. Notes............. $402,128,318 00

g whole number, at present, 242. West Virginia created since, with three Representatives—leaving Virginia 8, instead of 11 allowed in 1860.

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Voles in the U. S. House of Representatives on the Various Tariffs.

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* Statement of the Public Debt of the United States on the 1st of June, 1866.

Fractional Currency

27,334,965 04 Gold Certificates of Deposit.

22,568,320 00

–– 452,031,60304 - ––-T Total Debt ......... 2,799,979,450 it Amount in Treasury, Coin ---------------------------- -- 50,679,957 72 44 44 Currency....................................................

79,011,125 52

129,691,083% Amount of Debt, less Cash in Treasury.

-—T s2,670,288,307 & —r

*July 12–In SENATE, postponed till December next—yeas 23, nays 17, as follow: YEAS–Messrs. Brown, Davis, Doolittle, Foster, Grimes, Guthrie, Isarris, IIenderson, Hendricks, Johnson, Kirkwood, Lane, Morgan, Nesmith, Norton, Pomeroy, Rudule, Sauls bury, Sumner, Trumbull, Willey, Williams, Wilson—23. NAVS–Messrs. Anthony, Chandler, Clark, Conness, Cowan, Cragin, Edmunds, Fessenden, Howard, Howe, Poland, Ram sey, Sherman, Sprague, Stewart, Wan Winkle, Wade—17. o *

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ABAMA, reconstruction facts, 12, 21–34; claimants in Con-
gress, 107,108; resolutions of legislature, 22; laws on
free drinen, 33, 34.
MENDMENT of CoNSTITUTION, President Johnson's message,
and Secretary Seward's report upon,83, 84; votes adopt-
ing, 102; preliminary votes and propositions, 103–106.
MNESTY, President Johnson's proclamation of, 9; Mr. Sew-
ard’s circular, 10.
NeoN A. SYDENHAM E., resolution on Fenians, 113.
NTI-slav ERY AMENDMENT, announcement of ratification of,
6; action of insurrectionary States. 19–24; President
Johnson's telegrams respecting, 22, 23, Ž5.
PPoinTMENTS To office, President Johnson's order respect-
ing, 17.
Box AN's As, President Johnson's telegram to Gov. Murphy,
28; claimants in Congress, 107, 108.
RREst of DAVIs, CLAY, &c., order for, 7; release of Clay,
note, 8; resolution on trial of Davis, 113.
.8sassins of ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President Johnson's orders
for trial and punishment of 7.
INGHAM, John A., reports on immunities of citizens, 105;
concerning Tennessee, 105; amendment to resolution
on President’s policy, 111.
$1.ock AIDE, proclamation concerning, 7, 9, 13.
jouTwell, GEORGE S., resolution respecting trial of Jeffer-
son Davis, 113. -
3Rooks, JAMEs, Representative in thirty-ninth Congress, 108;
vanseated, note, 108.
3Row NLow, WILLIAM G., President Johnson's telegram to,

CABINET of President Johnson, 107.
CAMPBELL, John A., parole of, 14.
CANBY, E. R. S., telegram forbidding meeting of rebel legis-
latures, 19. -
CENsus TABLEs, on Representation, population, &c., 125.
CITIZENSHIP of UNITED STATES, proposed Constitutional
amendment respecting, 102; legislation upon, 78; Pres-
ident Johnson's views, 74.
rv11, RIGHTs, proposed amendment to secure, 102–106.
IVIL RIGHTs BILL, President Johnson's veto of, and votes
on passing and re-passing, 74–80.
CLARK, CHARLEs, parole of, 14; attempt to call rebel legisla-
ture and General Canby's order forbidding, 19.
CLAY, CLEMENT C., reward for arrest, 8; parole of, note, 8.
Cooes, FREEDMEN's, orders, and legislation, 12, 13, 29–44.
CoLoRADo, bill for admission of, veto and votes, 81–83.
CoLoRED PEOPLE, of District of Columbia, President Johnson's
address to, 63; conventions and action of, in insurrec-
tionary States, 18, 20, 21–24.
CoLoRED SoLDIERs, President Johnson's addresses to, 49–52.
Color|ED SUFFRAGE, President Johnson's telegram to Prov.
Gov. Sharkey on, 19, 20; President Lincoln's letter to
Governor Hahn on, note, 20; President Johnson's allu-
sions to, 24, 49, 52–55; proposed in District of Columbia,
114-116; in the Territories, 116; proposed in Connec-
ticut and vote, 120.
CoMMERCIAL INTERCOURSE, President Johnson's orders re-
specting, 7, 9, 13.

CongBESS, resolution on duty of, to guarantee a republican
- form of government, 1.12; President Johnson's telegram
to Provisional Governor Perry on organization of 39th,
24; members of 39th, 107, 108.
CoNNECTICUT, election of 1865 on colored suffrage, and elec-
tion of 1866, 120.
CoNSTITUTION of THE UNITED STATEs, copy of 1–6; Mr. Sew-
ard's certificate of ratification of anti-slavery amend-
ment, 6; President Johnson’s message on proposed
amendment to, 83; votes on propositions of amendment,
102–106.
Convention, proposed National Union, 118; resolution of
Democratic National, 118; of Pennsylvania Union and
Democrat, 123; Union National, 117; Maryland Union,
124; Southern Unionist, 124.
Cooper, EDMUND, telegram respecting peace proclamation,
17; claimant of seat in Congress, 108.
Davis, JEFFERSON, President Johnson's order for arrest of, 7;
resolution for trial of 113.
DEFREE8, Joseph H., resolution on elective franchise, 110.
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL PLATFORM of 1864, 118; Address of
Democratic Congressmen, 119, 120; platform of Penna.,
123.

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ELECTIONs of 1866, returns of 120.
ELECTIVE FRANCHISE in the States, resolution concerning,
110; in Territories, to be no discrimination on account
of color, 116; President Johnson’s allusion to, 19, 20,
24, 49, 52–55; President Lincoln, note, 24.
FENIANs, President Johnson's proclamation respecting, 17,
18; Attorney General Speed's order for arrest of, note,
18; resolution on, 113, 114.
FLORIDA, provisional governor appointed, 12; General Gill-
more's order annulling the call of acting Gov. Allison
for meeting of rebel legislature, 24 ; reconstruction,
Steps in, 24, 25; Freedmen's code, 38–41; claimants in
Congress, 107,108.
Foot, SoLoMox, Senator, death of, 107.
FoRNEY, John W., Secretary of the Senate, 107; allusion of
President Johnson to, 61.
FREEDMEN, orders respecting, 12, 13; laws concerning, 29–44.
FREEDMEN's BUREAU, President Johnson's veto of bill for, and
votes on passing and repassing, 68–74; number of rations
issued by, to April 1, 1866, note, 69.
GEORGIA, General Gillmore's order annulling Gov. Brown's
call for a meeting of the rebel legislature, 20; recon-
struction, steps in, 20, 21; laws on freedmen, 32, 33;
claimants in Congress, 107, 108.
GRANT, ULyss Es S., General, report on condition of insurrec-
tionary States, 67, .68; surrender of Lee to, 120, 121;
orders of, to protect loyal persons and suppress disloyal
newspapers, 122, 123, 124.
IIABEAS COR PUS, annulling suspension of, in certain States,
15; resolution on, 1.12; bill respecting, 116.
HALE, ROBERT S., amendment to jof Columbia stor.
frage bill, 114.
HARLAN, JAMES, Secretary of the Interior, 107.
lio, JAMES II. D., resolution on punishment of trea-
son, 109.
HILL, RALPH, resolution on test oath, 110.
Hold EN, WILLIAM W., appointed provisional governor of
North Carolina, 11; President Johnson's telegram to,
respecting rebel debt, 19; defeated for Governor, 19.
IIoMESTEAD Act, bill extending the, votes on, 116.
HowARD, O. O., orders of, as Commissioner of Freedmen’s
Affairs, 12, 13.
INSURRECTIONARY STATES, President's proclamations concern-
ing 7, 9, 11, 13–17; reconstruction steps in, 18–28; le-
gislation respecting freedmen, 29–44; President John-
Son's messages, concerning, 64–67; Lieutenant General
Grant's report, 67, 63; President Johnson on represen-
tation of 57–66, 71, 72; votes in Congress upon, note,”
72; reports and propositions, 102–106; claimants from,
o,seats in Congress, and memoranda respecting, 107,
Johnson, ANDREW, Cabinet of, 107: inauguration of, 44.
Johnson, ANDR:w, INTERVIEws AND SPEECHEs—To citizens
of Indiana, 44–47; Nashville speech of June 9, 1864,
note, 46, 47; to Virginia refugees, 47, 48; with George
L. Stearns, 48,49; to colored soldiers, October 10, 1865,
49–51; with Senator Dixon, 51–52; with colored delega-
tion respecting suffrage, and reply of 52–55; with com-
mittee of the Virginia legislature, 56–58; speech of
February 22, 1866, 58–63; speech to colored people of
District of Columbia, 63. -
Johnson, ANDREW, MESSAGES OF-Annual, 64–66; special,
on the condition of the insurrectionary States, 66, 67;
veto of Freedmen's Bureau bill, 68–72; veto of civil
rights bill, 74–78; veto of Colorado bill, 81, 82; on pro-
posed constitutional amendment, 83.
Johnson, ANDREW, ORDERs AND PRocI. AMATIONs of, 7–18;
on commercial intercourse and blockade, 7, 9, 13; for
trial and punishment of Abraham Lincoln’s assassins,
7; for arrest of Jefferson Davis, Clement C. Clay, and
others, 7 ; for release of latter, note, 8; recognizing
Pierpoint's administration in Virginia, 8; respecting
rebel cruisers receiving hospitality in foreign polts, 9;
of amnesty, 9, 10; appointing provisional governors in
North Carolina, Mississippi, Georgia, Texas, Alabama,
South Carolina, Florida, 11, 12; respecting freedmen, 12,
13; for return of property to pardoned persons, 13; re-
specting the State of Tennessee, 13, 14; Passports for pa-
roled prisoners, 14; paroling certain State prisoners, 14;
withdrawing martial law from Kentucky, 15; annulling
the suspension of the habeas corpus, 15; announcing
that the rebellion has ended, 15, 16; President John-
son's interpretation thereof, note, 17; in relation to
appointments to office, 17: in relation to trials by mili-
tary courts and comm ssions, 17; forbidding the inva-
sion of Canada by the Fenians, 17, 18.
Johnson, ANDREW, TEL.GRAMS OF, to Provisional Governor
Holden on repudiating rebel debt of North Carolina,

19; to Provisional Governor Sharkey, on colored suf.

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frage in Mississippi, 19, 20; to Provisional Governor
..Johnson oa repudiating rebel debt of Georgia, 20, 21;
to Provisional Governor Perry of South Carolina on
ratifying anti-slavery amendment, 22, on annulling
ordinance of secession, 23, on Representatives elected
to Congress presenting their credentials, 24; to Pro-
visional Governor Marvin of Florida, 25; to Governor
Brownlow of Tennessee on sustaining and enforcing the
election laws of that State, 27; to Governor Murphy of
Arkansas, 28.
Johnson, ANDREw, thanks of House to, 113; sundry resolu-
tions respecting, 111, 112.
Johnson, JAMEs, appointed provisional governor of Geor-
gia, 12, telegrams from and to, 20, 21
Johnstox, Joseph E., agreement with General Sherman,
121, 122.
JOINT Reconstruction Cox(MITTEE, majority and minority
reports of, 84-101; various propositions of, and votes
upon, 102–106.
KELLEY, WILLIAM D., bill to regulate suffrage in District of
Columbia, 114.
KENTUcky, withdrawal of martial law, 15.
KIRKwood, SAMUEL J., qualified as Senator, note, 107.
LEE, R. E., surrender to General Grant, 120, 121.
LINCol.N, ABRAHAM, orders for trial and punishment of assas-
sins of, 7; letter of, to Governor Hahn on colored suf.
frage, note, 20; telegram to General Weitzel forbidding
the meeting of the rebel legislature of Virginia, 26.
LIST of CoNGRESSMEN AND CLAIMANTS, 107, 108.
LoNGYEAR, John W., resolutions on public affairs, 111–113.
LouisiaNA, J. M. Wells elected Governor, 28; James T. Mon-
roe mayor of New Orleans, and pardon of 28, 29; legis-
lation on freedmen, 43, 44; claimants in Congress, 107,
vin, WM., appointed provisional governor of Florida,
12; claimantsof seat in Senate, 107.
MARYLAND, Unconditional Union platform, 124.
McCULLoch, Hugh, Secretary of Treasury, 107.
McPherson, Edward, Clerk of House, 108; telegrams of
Provisional Governor Perry, as to action of 24.
MEss AGEs of PRESIDENT Joaxson, annual, 64–66; on con-
dition of insurrectionary States, 66; vetoes of Freedmen's
Bureau, Civil Rights, and Colorado bills, 64–82; on pro-
posed constitutional amendment, 82.
MILITARY Courts, effect of peace proclamation upon, note,
17; order in relation to trials by, 17.
Mississippi, rebel legislature forbidden to assemble, 19;
reconstruction steps in, 19, 20; President Johnson’s
telegram to Provisional Governor Sharkey on col-
ored suffrage, 19, 20; convention of colored people of,
20; laws on freedmen, 29–32; claimants in Congress,
107, 108.
MoRRILL, Lot M. amendments to District of Columbia suf.
frage bill, 115.
NEBRAskA. election of 1866, 120.
NEW HAMPSHIRE, election of 1866, 120.
NEw JERSEY, Senator from, unseated, note, 107. -
North CAROLINA, provisional governor appointed, 11; steps
taken in reconstruction, 18, 19: claimants for seats in
Senate and House, 107,108; convention of colored peo-
ple of 18; laws concerning freedmen, 29.
Officz, President Johnson's order respecting appointments
to, 17.
ORDERs, MILITARY, of General Sickles, setting aside Freed-
men's code for South Carolina, 36–38; of General Terry
in Virginia, 41–42; President Johnson declined to inter-
fere, 42; of General Grant to protect loyal persons and
suppress disloyal newspapers, 122, 123, 124.
OREGON, election of 1866, 120.
PARDoNED REBELs, order for return of property to, 13.
PARoleD PRISONERs, passports ordered for, 14, 15.
PAR8oNS, LEWIS E., appointed provisional governor of Ala-
bama, 12; claimant of seat as Senator, 107.
PENNSYLVANIA, resolutions of Union and Democratic conven-
tions, 123.
PERRY, BENJAMIN F., appointed provisional governor of
South Carolina, 12; telegrams on sundry topics, 22, 23,
24; claimant of seat as Senator, 107.
PHILLIPs, WENDELL, allusion of President Johnson to, 61
PLATFoRMs of 1864, Union and Democratig, 117, 118.
Provision AL Gover:Norts appointed, 11, 12.
PUBLIC DEBT, resolution respecting inviolability of 109; pro-
posed constitutional amendment respecting, 102, 103;
amount of, 126.
PUBLIC LANDs, legislation on, 116.
RANDALL, SAMUEL. J., resolution on public debt, 109.
REBEL CRUISEas, proclamation concerning, 9.
REBELLION SUPPREssed, proclamation announcing the, 15, 16.
REBELs PARDONED, order for return of property to, 13.
REBEL DEBr, proposition to repudiate, 102, 106: resolution
concerning, 109; action of legislatures of insurrection-
ary states on rebel State debt, 19, 21, 23, 24.28.
RECONSTRUCTION CoMMITTEE, majority and minority reports
* 84-101; votes upon propositions of, 102–106.

REPRESENTATION, proposed constitutional amendmen
102–105; census tables on, 125
REPRESENTATION of INSURRECTIONARY STATEs, President
son's allusions to, 57–66, 71, 72, 82; concurrent r
tion upon, note, 72; majority and minority reports
84–101; bills and propositions relating to, 102
resolution concerning, 109.
Horows IN THIRTY-NINTB CONGRESS AND CLAIM
, 109.
ResoluTIONS ON PoliticAL SUBJECTs, 109–114.
Rhode ISLAND, election of 1866, 120.
SCIIENCK, ROBERT C., propositions on representation.
105; on Fenian resolution, 114; on suffrage in Dis
of Columbia, 115.
so IN THIRTY-NINTH CONGRESS, AND CLAIMANTs,

SEwARD, WILLIAM H., Secretary of State, 107 ; certificat-
a ratification of anti-slavery amendment, 6; teleg
to provisional governors, 21, 23, 24, 25; “report
transmission of proposed constitutional amendm
SHARKEY, WILLIAM L., provisional governor of Mississip;,
12; action as, 19, 20; President Johnson’s telegram
colored suffrage, 19, 20; claimant as Senator, 107.
SHERMAN, WILLIAM T., agreement with General Joseph E.
Johnston, 121, 122.
SICKLEs, DANIEL E, order of, setting aside South Carolina's
code, 36–38.
South CAROLINA, provisional governor appointed, 12; re-
construction, steps in, 22–24; General Gillmore's order
annulling Governor Magrath's call for legislature, 2.
President Johnson's and Secretary Seward's telegrano,
22, 23, 24; failure to repudiate rebel debt, note, 24.
form of ratifying anti-slavery amendment, 23; i.
on freedmen, and order of General Sickles relating
thereto, 34–37; claimants in Congress, 107, 108.
SPEED, JAMEs, Attorney General, 107; order for arrest of
Fenians, note, 18. -
STANTON, EDw1N M., Secretary of War, 107.
STEARNs, GEORGE L., President Johnson's interview with,

9, ra.
STEPHENS, ALEXANDER. H., parole of, 14; claimant in Con-
gress, 107.
STEVENS, THADDEUs, allusion of President Johnson to, 61
resolution on representation, note, 72; propositions
from Reconstruction Committee, 103–105 ; resolutiot
on test oath for lawyers, 111; motion not to recoguizt
the North Carolina State government, 113.
STocKTON, John P., Senator, 107; unseated, note, 107.
SUFFRAGE in District of Columbia, 114–116; in territories,
116, 117; vote in Connecticut, 120; President Lincoln
upon, note, 20; President Johnson, 19, 20, 24, 49.52-55.
SUMNER, CHARLEs, allusion of President Johnson to, 61.
TABER, STEPHEN, amendment to homestead act, 116
Tao, STATEMENTs, on representation, tariff, debt, 125,
6.
TARIFF, votes on all, since 1816, 126.
TENNESSEE, President Johnson's proclamation respecting
suppression of insurrection in, 13; franchise acts in, 27,
23, and President Johnson's telegram concerning. 2: .
legislation on freedmen, 42, 43; joint resolution con-
cerning, 105. . |
TERRITORIES, elective franchise in, 116.
TERRY, General, order setting aside vagrant act of Virginia,
41, 42; sustained by President Johnson, 42.
TEST OATH, action of North Carolina requesting repeal of,
19; of Mississippi, 20; vote in IIolase on, 110, 111.
TEXAS, provisional governor appointed, 12; action of con-
vention, 28: legislation on freedmen, 43.
Thor NToN, ANTHoxy, resolution on elective franchise, 110.
TREAson, PUNIsh MENT of, resolution respecting, 109. -
TRENnoi.M., Goos.go, A., parole of, 14. |
WingINIA, order to re-establish authority of United States in,
8, 9; call for meeting of rebel iegislature, 23; Mr. Lin-
coln's telegram forbidding it, 25; legislation, &c., in, 26,
27; freedmen’s code, and General Terry's order setting
aside vagrant act, 41, 42; claimants in Congress, 107.
108

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Voorhees, DANIEL W., Representative in Thirty-Ninth Con-
gress, 103; unseated, note, 108; resolution endorsing
President Johnson's policy, ill
WARREN, G :UVE: R K., General, telegram of General
Ciu; by to, prohibiting the meeting of the rebel legisla-
ture of Mississippi, 19.
W \sup URN, IIENRY D., qualified as Representative, note, 108.
W.I.LEs, Gippon, Secretary of the Navy, 107. -
West VIRGIN1 v., bill, votes on, 116; election of 1866, 120.
WILLEy, WAITMAN T, amendment to District of Columbia
bill ll:5, 116.
WILLIAMs, Thomas, resolution on withdrawal of military
force, 111.
Wilson, J \MEs F., proposition relative to rebel debt, 106,
resolution on representation, 109, 110; amendraent to
District of Columbia bill, 114.

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