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consequent upon any proclamations, issued by virtue of the fifth section of the act entitled “An act further to provide for the collection of duties on imports and for other purposes,” approved the thirteenth day of July, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, are removed. But nothing herein contained shall be considered or construed as in any wise changing or impairing any of the penalties and forfeitures for treason heretofore incurred under the laws of the United States, or any of the provisions, restrictions, or disabilities set forth in my proclamation, bearing date the twenty-ninth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and sixtyfive, or as impairing existing regulations for the suspension of the habeas corpus, and the exercise of miliary law in cases where it shall be necessary for the general public safety and welfare during the existing insurrection; nor shall this roclamation affect, or in any way impair, any i. heretofore F. by Congress, and duly approved by the President, or any proclamations or orders, issued by him, during the aforesaid insurrection, abolishing slavery, or in any way affecting the relations of slavery, whether of persons or of property; but on the contrary, all such laws and proclamations heretofore made or issued are expressly saved, and declared to be in full force and virtue. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this thirteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and [SEAL.] sixty-five, and of the independence of the United States of America the eightyninth. ANDREW Johnson. By the President: WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

Blockade Rescinded, June 23, 1865.

Whereas by the proclamation of the President of the fifteenth and twenty-seventh of April, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, a blockade of certain ports of the United States was set on foot; but whereas the reasons for that measure have ceased to exist: Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do hereby declare and proclaim the blockade aforesaid to be rescinded as to all the ports aforesaid, including that of Galveston and other ports west of the Mississippi river, which ports will be open to foreign commerce on the first of July next, on the terms and conditions set forth in m proclamation of the twenty-second of May last. It is to be understood, however, that the blockade thus rescinded was an international measure for the purpose of protecting the sovereign rights of the {}. States. The greater or less subversion of civil authority in the region to which it applied, and the impracticability of at once restoring that in due efficiency, may, for a season, make it advisable to employ the army and navy of the United States towards carrying the laws into effect, wherever such employment may be necessary. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my

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Whereas by my proclamations of the thi teenth and twenty-fourth of June, one thousan eight hundred and sixty-five, removing restri tions, in part, upon internal, domestic, and coast wise intercourse and trade with those Stat. recently declared in insurrection, certain article were excepted from the effect of said proclama tions as contraband of war; and whereas th necessity for restricting trade in said articles ha now, in a great ineasure, ceased: It is hereb. ordered, that on and after the 1st day of Sep tember, 1865, all restrictions aforesaid be re moved, so that the articles declared by the sai proclamations to be contraband of war may b imported into and sold in said States, subjec only to such regulations as the Secretary of th Treasury may prescribe.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. |

Done at the city of Washington this twenty ninth day of August, in the year of ou. Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of the Independence of th United States of America the ninetieth.

ANDREW JoBNson.

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By the President:
WILLIAM. H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

Passports for Paroled Prisoners. | DEPARTMENT of STATE, WASHINGTON, August 25, 1865 Paroled prisoners asking passports as citizen of the United States, and against whom no spe cial charges may be pending, will be furnishes with passports upon application therefor to th Department of State in the usual form. Such passports will, however, be issued upon the con dition that the applicants do not return to the United States without leave of the President Other persons implicated in the rebellion, who may wish to go abroad, will apply to the De. partment of State, for passports, and the appli. cations will be disposed of according to the merits of the of. | By the President of the United States. WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

Paroling certain State Prisoners.

ExECUTIVE OFFICE, WASHINGTON, October 11, 1865. Whereas the following named persons, to wit: John A. Campbell, of Alabama; John H. Reagan, of Texas; Alexander H. Stephens, of

Georgia; George A. Trenholm, of South Carolina; and Charles Clark, of Mississippi, lately

engaged in rebellion against the United States Government, who are now in close custody, have made their submission to the authority of the United States and applied to the President for pardon under his proclamation; and whereas, the authority of the Federal Government is sufficiently restored in the aforesaid States to admit of the enlargement of said persons from close custody, it is ordered that they be released on giving their respective paroles to appear at such time and place as the President may designate, to answer any charge that he may direct to be preferred against them; and also that they will respectively abide until further orders in the laces herein designated, and not depart there}. John A. Campbell, in the State of Alabama; John H. Reagan, in the State of Texas; Alexander H. Stephens, in the State of Georgia; George A. Trenholm, in the State of South Carolina; and Charles Clark, in the State of Mississippi. And if the President should grant his pardon to any of said persons, such person's parole will be thereby discharged. ANDREW JoBINSON, President. Martial Law. Withdrawn from Kentucky, October 12, 1865. Whereas by a proclamation of the fifth day of July, one thousand eight hundred and sixtyfour, the President of the United States, when the civil war was flagrant, and when combinations were in progress in Kentucky for the purose of inciting insurgent raids into that State, irected that the proclamation suspending the writ of habeas corpus should be made effectual in Kentucky, and that martial law should be established there and continue until said proclamation should be revoked or modified; And whereas since then the danger of insurgent raids into Kentucky has substantially passed 3WaW: R&. therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution, do hereby declare that the said proclamation of the fifth day of July, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four, shall be, and is hereby, modified in so far that martial law shall b: no longer in force in Kentucky from and after the date hereof. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

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And whereas the reasons for that suspension may be regarded as having ceased in some of the States and Territories:

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do hereby proclaim and declare that the suspension aforesaid, and all other proclamations and orders o the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus in the States and Territories of the United States, are revoked and annulled excepting as to the States of Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, an Texas, the District of Columbia, and the Territories of New Mexico and Arizona.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington this first day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five and of the ††, of the Únited States of America the ninetieth.

ANDREW JoBNSON.

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By the President:
WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

Announcing that the Rebellion has ended, April 2, 1866 Whereas, by proclamations of the fifteenth and nineteenth of April, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, the President of the United States, in virtue of the power vested in him by the Constitution and the laws, declared that the laws of the United States were opposed, and the execution thereof obstructed in the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, or by the powers vested in the marshals by law; And whereas, by another proclamation made on the sixteenth day of August, in the same year, in pursuance of an act of Congress approve July thirteenth, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, the inhabitants of the States of Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Florida (except the inhabitants of that part of the State of Virginia lying west of the Alleghany mountains, and to such other parts of that State and the other States before named, as o maintain a loyal adhesion to the Union and the Constitution, or might be from time to time occupied and controlled by forces of the United States engaged in the dispersion of insurgents) were declared to be in a state of insurrection against the United States; And whereas, by another proclamation of the first day of July, one ...} eighthundred and sixty-two, issued in pursuance of an act of Congress approved June 7, in the same year, the insurrection was declared to be still existing in the States aforesaid, with the exception of certain specified counties in the State of Virginia; And whereaft, by another proclamation made on the second say of April, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, in pursuance of the act of Congress of July 13, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, the exceptions named in the Fo: August 16, one thousand eight undred and sixty-one were revoked, and theinhabitants of the States of Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Florida, and Vir5. (except the forty-eight counties of Virginia esignated as West Virginia, and the ports of New Orleans, Key West, Port Royal, and Beaufort, in South Carolina.) were declared to be still in a state of insurrection against the United States. And whereas the House of Representatives, on the 22d day of July, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, joi a resolution in the words following, namely: “Resolved by the House of Representatives of the Congress of the United States, That the pres: ent deplorable civil war has been forced upon, the country by the disunionists of the southern States, now in revolt against the constitutional Government, and in arms around the capital; that in this national emergency Congress, banishing all feelings of mere passion or resentment, will recollect only its duty to the whole country; that this war is not waged on our part in any spirit of oppression, nor for any purpose of conquest or subjugation, nor purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of those States; but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and to preserve the Union with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired; that as soon as these objects are accomplished, the war ought to cease.” And whereas the Senate of the United States, on the 25th day of July, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, adopted a resolution in the words following, to wit: “Resolved, That the present, deplorable civil war has been forced upon the country by the disunionists of the southern States, now in revolt against the constitutional Government, and in arms around the capital; that in this national emergency Congress, banishing all feeling of mere passion or resentment, will recollect only its duty to the whole country; that this war is not prosecuted on our part in any spirit of opression nor for any purpose of conquest or subjo, nor purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of those States, but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and all laws made in pursuance thereof, and to preserve the Union with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired; that as soon as these objects are accomplished, the war ought to cease.” And whereas these resolutions, though not joint or concurrent in form, are substantially łoń. and as such may be regarded as having expressed the sense of Congress upon the subject to which they relate; And whereas, by my proclamation of the thirenth day of June last, the insurrection in the tate of Tennessee was declared to have been suppressed, the authority of the United States therein to be undisputed, and such United States fficers as had been duly commissioned to be in he undisputed exercise of their official functions; And whereas there now exists no organized armed resistance of misguided citizens or others

to the authority of the United States in the States of Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia. North Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama, Louisiana; Arkansas, Mississippi, and Florida, and the laws can be sustained and enforced therein by the proper civil authority, State or Federal, and the people of the said States are well and loyally disposed, and have conformed or will conform is their legislation to the condition of affairs grow. ing out of the amendment to the Constitution of the United States, prohibiting slavery within. the limits and jurisdiction of the United States; And whereas, in view of the before recited premises, it is the manifest determination of the American people that no State, of its own will has the right or the power to go out of, or separate itself from, or be separated from the American Union, and that therefore each State ought to remain and constitute an integral part of the United States; And whereas the people of the several beforementioned States have, in the manner aforesaid, given satisfactory evidence that they acquiesce in this sovereign and important resolution of national unity; a And whereas it is believed to be a fundamental principle of government that people who have revolted, and who have been overcome and sub-1' dued, must either be dealt with so as to induces them voluntarily to become friends, or else they must be held by absolute military power, or dé. vastated, so as to prevent them from ever again || doing harm as enemies, which last-named policy || is abhorrent to humanity and freedom : | And whereas the Constitution of the United it States provides for constituent communities only as States and not as Territories, dependencies, provinces, or protectorates; And whereas such constituent States must ne: cessarily be and by the Constitution and laws of the United States are made equals and placed upon a like footing as to political rights, immu nities, dignity, and power, with the several States with which they are united; And whereas the observance of political equality as a principle of right and justice is well cal: culated to encourage the people of the aforesaid || States to be and become more and more constant and persevering in their renewed allegiance; And whereas standing armies, military occu. pation, martial law, military tribunals, and the suspension of the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus are, in time of peace, dangerous to public libérty, incompatible with the individual rights of the citizen, contrary to the genius and spirit of our free institutions, and exhaustive of the national resources, and ought not, therefore, to be sanctioned or allowed, except in cases of actual necessity, for repelling invasion or suppressing insurrection or rebellion; And whereas the policy of the Government of the United States, from the beginning of the insurrection to its overthrow and final suppression, has been in conformity with the principles herein set forth and enumerated: Now, therefore, I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do hereby proclaim and declare that the insurrection which heretofore existed in the States of Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee,

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ExECUTIVE MANsion, April 7, 1866.

It is eminently right and proper that the 3 overnment of #, United States should give »arnest and substantial evidence of its just apPreciation of the services of the patriotic men who, when the life of the nation was imperiled, 2ntered the army and navy to preserve the integrity of the Union, defend the Government, and maintain and perpetuate unimpaired its `ree institutions. It is . directed: ; First. That in appointments to office in the several executive departments of the General 3 overnment and the various branches of the oublic service connected with said departments, breference shall be given to such meritorious and honorably discharged soldiers and sailors, particularly those who have been disabled by wounds received or diseases contracted in the line of duty, as may possess the proper qualifications.

Second. That in all promotions in said departments and the of branches of the public service connected therewith, such persons shall have preference, when equally eligible and

* The following official telegraphic correspondence shows the scope of the proclamation, in the opinion of the President:

'Maj. Gen. O. O. HowARD: Does the President's recent proclamation remove martial law in this. State? If so, Gen. Brannan does not feel authorized to arrest parties who have committed outrages on freed people or Union refugees. Please answer by telegraph. * DAVIS TILLSoN, * -- Brig. Gen. of Vols. [Answer.] o ADJUTANT GENERAL's Office, WAR DEPARTMENT, o WASHINGTON, April 17, 1866. The President’s proclamation does not remove martial law, or operate in any way upon the Freedmen's Bureau in the exercise of its legitimate jurisdiction. It is not expedient, however, to resort to military tribunal in any case where justice can be attained through the medium of civil authority. E. D. TownsenD, A. A. G. To governor worth, of NQRTH carolina. WASHINGTON, D.C., April 27, 1866. * To Gov. Wonth: I am directed by the President to inform : you that by his proclamation of April 2, 1866, it was not intended to interfere with military commissions at that time or previously organized, or trials then pending before * such commissions, unless by special instructions the accused : were to be turned over the civil authorities. General Ruger has been instructed to proceed with the trial to which you refer; but before the execution of any sentence rendered by * said commission, to report all the proceedings to the War Department for examination and revision. There has been s an order this day prepared, and which will soon be issued, ... which will relieve and settle all embarrassment growing " out of a misconstruction of the proclamation, of which i A will send you a copy. Edward Cooper, . 2. ' cting Private Secretary to the President.

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AUGUSTA, GA., April 7, 1866.

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qualified, over those who have not faithfully and honorably served in the i. and naval forces of the United States.

ANDREW JoBNson.

Order in Relation to Trials by Military Courts and Commissions.

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT GENERAL's OFFICE, WASHINGTON, May 1, 1866.

General Orders No. 26:

Whereas some military commanders are embarrassed by doubts as to the operation of the proclamation of the President, dated the 2d day of April, 1866, upon trials by military courtsmartial and military offenses, to remove such doubts, it is ordered by the President that—

Hereafter, whenever offenses committed by civilians are to be tried where civil tribunals are in existence which can try them, their cases are not authorized to be, and will not be, brought before military courts-martial or commissions, but will be committed to the proper civil author. ities. This order is not ap i. to camp followers, as provided for under the 60th Article of War, or to contractors and others specified in section 16, act of July 17, 1862, and sections 1 and 2, act of March 2, 1863. Persons and of. fenses cognizable by the Rules and Articles of War, and by the acts of Congress above cited, will continue to be tried and punished by mili: tary tribunals as prescribed by the Rules and Articles of War and acts of Congress, hereinafter cited, to wit:

Sixtieth of the Rules and Articles of War. All sutlers and retainers to the camp, and all persons whatsoever serving with the armies of the United States in the field, though not enlisted soldiers, are to be subject to orders according to the rules and discipline of war. * * * *

By order of the Secretary of War: o

- %. D. TownsenD, Assistant Adjutant General.

Against the Fenian Invasion of Canada, June 6, 1866. - . ."

Whereas it has beeome known to me that certain evil-disposed persons have, within the territory and jurisdiction of the United States, begun and set on foot, and have provided and prepared, and are still engaged in providing and preparing, means for a military expedition and enterprise, which expedition and enterprise is to be carried on from the territory and jurisdiction of the United States against colonies, districts, and people of British North America, within the dominions of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, with which said colonies, districts, and people, and kingdom the United States are at peace; "

And whereas the proceedings aforesaid constitute a high misdemeanor, forbidden by the laws of the United States, as well as by the law of nations: !

Now, therefore, for the purpose of preventing the carrying on of the unlawful expedition and enterprise aforesaid, from the territory and jurisdiction of the United States, and to maintain the public peace, as well as the national honor, * enforce obedience and respect to the

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laws of the United States, I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do admonish and warn all good citizens of the United States against taking part in or in any wise aiding, countenancing, or abetting said unlawful proceedings, and I do exhort all judges, magistrates, marshals, and officers in the service of the United States, to employ all their awful authority and ower to prevent and defeat the aforesaid unawful proceedings, and to arrest and bring to justice all persons who may be engaged therein."

And, pursuant to the act of Congress in such case made and provided, I do furthermore authorize and empower Major General George G. Meade, commander of the Military Division of the Atlantic, to employ the land and naval forces of the United šo and the militia thereof, to arrest and prevent, the setting on foot and carrying on the expedition and enterprise aforesaid.

- * In testimony whereof, I have hereunto hand, and caused the seal of the United to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington the six of June, in the year of our Lor [SEAL.] thousand eight hundred and six, and of the Independence o United States the ninetieth. ANDREW John: By the President: WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of

* Circular to the District Attorneys and Marshals United States. ATToRNEY GENERAL's Office, WASHINGTox, D. C. 5, 1866.-By direction of the President you are her structed to cause the arrest of all prominent, lead conspicuous persons called Fenians, whom you ma probable cause to believe have been or may be gi violations of the neutrality laws of the United State JAMES SPEED, Attorney G

III.

ACTION OF THE CONVENTIONS AND LEGISLATURES - THE LATELY INSURRECTIONARY STATES.

TNORTH CAROLINA. 1865, April 27–Gen. Schofield announced the cessation of hostilities within that State. April 28–Gon. Schofield issued an order that, under the emancipation proclamation, all per; sons heretofore held as slaves are now free, and that it is the duty of the army to maintain their

eedom. May 29—William W. Holden appointed Provisional Governor. June 12–Provisional Governor Holden issued his proclamation announcing his purpose to or. der an election for a convention, and to appoint justices of the peace to administer the oath of allegiance and conduct the election, &c. July —President Johnson ordered the cotton of the State to be restored to her, and the É. of all that had been sold to be paid to er agents. August 8–Provisional Governor Holden fixed Thursday, September 21, for the election of a convention. Voters' qualifications are thus prescribed: “No person will be allowed to vote who is not a voter qualified as prescribed by the constitution and laws of the State in force immediately before the 20th day of May, 1861, except that the o: of poll tax shall not be required. “All paroled soldiers of the army and navy of the pretended Confederate States, or of this State, and all paroled officers of the army and navy of the pretended Confederate States, or of this State, under and including the rank of colonel, if of the army, and under and including the rank of lieutenant, if of the navy, will be i. to vote, pro

vided they are not included in any of the fou excluded classes of the President's amnesty clamation; and, provided further, that they citizens of the State in accordance with the t prescribed in the preceding paragraph. “No person will be allowed to vote who not exhibit to the inspectors a copy of the nesty oath, as contained in the President's clamation of May 29, 1865, signed by his and certified by at least two justices of the pe. The convention to meet October 2. September 29—The colored people of the: met in convention in Raleigh, and petitione legislation to secure compensation for labor enable them to educate their children, and ing protection for the family relation, and the repeal of oppressive laws making unjus. criminations on account of race or color. October 2—Convention met. October 7—The secession ordinance deci “null and void.” October 9—An ordinance passed, decla slavery forever 3. within the State. October 10–Ordinance passed, providing an election for Governor, members of the L. lature, and seven members of Congress Novet 9, the Provisional Governor to give the ces cates. Each member of the Legislature, each voter to be qualified “ according to the existing constitution of the State"; Provi That no one shall be eligible to a seat, or be pable of voting, who, being free in all ...; shall not, before May 29, 1865, have taken II dent Lincoln's amnesty oath, or have taken Pr dent Johnson's oath, and who shall not

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