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the table, which was lost—yeas 5, (Messrs. Cobb, Davis, Grinnell, Hale, Trowbridge,) nays 112. Mr. Schenck moved this as a substitute: . Resolved, That the President of the United States, in the opinion of this House, should reconsider the policy which has been adopted by him as between the British Government and that portion of the Irish people who, under the name of Fenians, are struggling for their independent nationality; and that he be requested to adopt as nearly as practicable that exact course of procedure ... was pursued by the Government of Great Britain on the occasion of the late civil war in this country between the United States and rebels in revolt, recognizing both parties as lawful belligerents, and observing between them a strict neutrality. Mr. Hale moved to table it; which was lost— yeas 8, (Messrs. Cobb, Davis, Dawes, Dodge, Griswold, Hale, Sloan, Trowbridge,) nays 113. Mr. Banks moved to refer to the Committee

on Foreign Affairs, stating that if referred the committee would report upon it. The motion. was agreed to—yeas 87, nays 35, as follow ; ;

YEAs—Messrs. Alley, Allison, Delos R. Ashley, James M. Ashley, Baker, Baldwin, Banks, Baxter, Beaman. Bidwell, Bingham, Blaine, Boutwell, Bromwell, Buckland, Bundy, Reader W. Clarke, Sidney Clarke, Cobb, Cook, Cullom, Dawes, Defrees, Delano, Dodge, Driggs, Eckley, Farnsworth, Farquhār, Grinnell, IIarris, Hart, Hayes, Holmes, Demas Hubbard, Edwin N. Hubbell, Jenckes, Jones, Kasson, Keiley, Kuykendall, Laflin, Latham, George W. Lawrence, William Lawrence, Longyear, Marvin, McClurg, McKee. McRuer, Mercur, Miller, Morrill, Morris, Moulton, Myers, O'Neill, Orth, Paine, Perham, Phelps, Pike, Plants, Price, William H. Randall, Raymond, Alexander H. Rice, John H. Rice, Ross, Rousseau, Sawyer, Schenck, Scofield, Sheilabarger, Sloan, Spalding, Thayer, Trowbridge, Upson, Ward, Welker, Whaley, Williams, James F. Wilson, Stephen F. Wilson, Windom, Woodbridge—87.

NAYs—Messrs. Ancona, Bergen, Boyer, Chanler, Coffroth, Darling, Davis, Dumont, Eldridge, Finck, Glossbrenner, Grider, IHale, Aaron Harding, Hogan, James M. Humphrey, Johnson, Kerr, Ketcham, McCullough, Niblack, Posneroy, Samuel J. Randall, Ritter, Rogers, Sitgreaves, Smith, Stillwell, Strouse, Taber, Taylor, Thornton, Trimble, Winfield, Wright—35.

XI.

WOTES ON SUFFRAGE IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

A ND OT H E R POLITIC A. L BILLS.

Suffrage in District of Columbia. IN Hous E.

January 10, 1866–Pending this bill, offered by Mr. Kelley, December 5, 1865, and reported from the Judiciary Committee by Mr. James F. Wilson, December 18, and then postponed till this day: A Bill extending the right of suffrage in the District of Columbia. Be it enacted, &c., That from all laws and parts of laws prescribing the qualifications of electors for any office in the District of Columbia the word “white ” be, and the same is hereby, stricken out, and that from and after the passage of this act no person shall be disqualified from voting at any election held in the said District on account of color. SEC. 2. That all acts of Congress and all laws of the State of Maryland in force in said District and all ordinances of the cities of Washington and Georgetown inconsistent with the provisions of this act are hereby repealed and annullad. After debate, Mr. Wilson moved its recommitment. Mr. Hale moved to amend by adding these words: with instructions to amend the bill so as to extend the right of suffrage in the District of Columbia to .# persons coming within either of the following classes, irrespective of caste or color, but subject only to existing provisions and

qualifications other than those founded on caste or color, to wit: . First. Those who can read the Constitution of the United States. Second. Those who are assessed for and pay taxes on real or personal property within the District. Third. Those who have served in and been honorably discharged from the military or naval service of the United States, and to restrict such right of suffrage to the classes above named, and to include proper provisions excluding from the right of suffrage those who have borne arm against the United States during the late rebel lion, or given aid or comfort to said rebellion. | January 17, 1866—Mr. Wilson accepted Mr. Hale's amendment as part of his. January 18—Mr. Darling moved to postpone the bill till April 3. Mr. Niblack moved to lay the bill on the table. which was disagreed to—yoas 47, nays 123, as follow :

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VOTES ON

#dwell, Bingham, Blaine, Blow, Boutwell, Brandegee, Bromsell, Broomall, Buckland, Bundy, Reader W. Clarke, Sidney harke, Cobb, Conkling, Cook, Cullom, Darling, Davis, Dawes, ofrees, Delano, Deming, Dixon, Donnelly, Driggs, Eckley, oggleston, Eliot, Farnsworth, Farquhar, Ferry, Garfield, Stinnell, Griswold, Hale, Abner C. Harding, Hart, Hayes, Henderson, Higby, Hill, Holmes, Hooper, Asahel W. Huboard, Demas Hubbard, jr., John H. Hubbard, Hulburd, James Humphrey, Ingersoll, Jenckes, Julian, Kesson, Kelley, Kelso, Retcham, Laflin, George W. Lawrence, William Lawrence, Loan, Longyear, Lynch, Marston, Marvin, McClurg, McKee, Mercur, Miiler, Moorhead, Morrill, Morris, Moulton, Myers, O'Neill, Orth, Paine, Patterson, Perham, Pike, Plants, Pomeroy, Price, Raymond, Alexander H. Rice; John II. Rice, Rollins, Sawyer, Schenck, Scofield, Shellabarger, Sloan, spalding, Starr, Stevens, Stillwell, Thayer, Francis Thomas,

Trowbridge, Upson, Van Aernam, Burt Van Horn, Robert.

T. Wan Horn, Ward, Warner, Ellihu B. Washburne, William B. Washburn, Welker, Wentworth, Williams, James F. Wilson, Stephen F. Wilson, Windom, Woodbridge—123.

Mr. Darling modified his motion so as to postpone until the first Tuesday in March, which was disagreed to—yeas 34, nays 138, as follow :

YEAs—Messrs. Anderson, Banks, Conkling, Darling, Davis, Defrees, Eggleston, Farquhar, Ferry, Griswold, Hale, Hart, Henderson, Hill, Hogan, Jas. Humphrey, Kasson, Ketcham, Kuykendall, Laflin, Latham, George W. Lawrence, Marvin, Mercur, Miller, Orth, Phelps, William H. Randall, Raymond, Smith, Stillwell, John L. Thomas, jr., Trimble, Robert T. Van Horn—34.

Nays—Messrs. Alley, Allison, Ames, Ancona, Delos R. Ashley, James M. Ashley, Baker, Baldwin, Barker, Baxter, Beaman, Benjamin, Bergen, Bidwell, Bingham, Blaine, Blow, Boutwell, Boyer, Brandegee, Bromwell, Brooks, Broomall, Bundy, Chanler, Reader W. Clarke, Sidney Clarke, Cobb, Cook, Cullom, Dawes, Dawson, Deming, Denison, Dixon, Donnelly, Driggs, Eckley, Eldridge, Eliot, Farnsworth, Finck,

Garfield, Glossbrenner, Goodyear, Grider, Grinneli, Aaron |

Harding, Abner C. Harding, Hayes, Higby, Holmes, Hooper, A. W. Hubbard, Chester D. Hubbard, Demas Hubbard, jr., John H. Hubbard, Edwin N. Hubbell, Hulburd, James M. Humphrey, Ingersoll, Jenckes, Johnson, Jones, Julian, Kelley, Kelso, Kerr, William Lawrence, Le Blond, Loan, Longyear, Lynch, Marshall, Marston, McClurg, McCullough, McKee, Moorhead, Morrill, Morris, Moulton, Myers, Niblack, Nicholson, Noell, O'Neill, Paine, Patterson, Perham, Pike, Plants, Pomeroy, Price, Radford, Samuel J. Randall, AlexAnder H. Rice, John H. Rice, Ritter, Rogers, Rollins, Ross, Sawyer, Schenck, Scofield, Shanklin, Shellabarger, Sitgreaves, Sloan, Spalding, Starr, Stevens, Strouse, Taber, Taylar, Thayer, Francis Thomas, Thornton, Trowbridge, Upson, Van Aernam, Burt Van Horn, Voorhees, Ward, Warner, Elihu B. Washburne, William B. Washburn, Welker, Wentworth, Williams, James F.Wilson, Stephen F. Wilson, Windom, Winfield, Woodbridge—135.

The question recurring on Mr. Wilson's motion to commit with instructions, Mr. Schenck moved 10 strike from the proposed instructions these words: “Those who are assessed for and pay taxes on real or personal property within the district;” which was agreed to. The motion to recommit as amended, was then disagreed to—yeas 53, nays, 117, as follow:

YEAS–Messrs. Anderson, Banks, Blow, Brandegee, Bromwell, Buckland, Reader W. Clarke, Conkling, Darling, Davis, wes, Defrees, Delano, Deming, Dixon, Driggs, Eckley, Eggleston, Ferry, Griswold, Hale, Hart, Hayes, Henderson, Hooper, Hulburd, James Humphrey, Jenckes, Kasson, Ketcham, Kuykendall, Laflin, Latham, George W. Lawrence, William Lawrence, Longyear, Marvin, Miller, Moorhead, Morris, Myers, O’Neill, Piants, Raymond, Alexander II. Rice, Schenck, Stillwell, Trowbridge, Burt Van Horn, Robert T. Van Horn, Warner, William B. Washburn, Woodbridge—53. Nays—Messrs. Alley, Allison, Ames, Ancona, Delos R. Ashley, James M. Ashley, Baker, i:iiwin, Barker, Baxter, Beaman, Benjamin, Bergen, Bidwell, Bingham, Blaine, BoutWell, Boyer, Brooks, Broomall, Bundy, Chanler, Clarke, Cobb, Cook, Cullom, Dawson, Denison, Donnelly, Eldridge, Eliot, Farnsworth, Farquhar, Finck, Garfield, Glossbrenner, Good'ar. Grider, Grinnell, Aaron Harding, Abner C. Harding, Higby, Hill, Hogan, Holmes, Asahel W. Hubbard, Chester B. Hubbard, Demas Hubbard, jr., John H. Hubbard, Edwin W. Hubbell, James M. Humphrey, Ingersoll, Johnson, Jones, Julian, Kelley, Kelso, Kerr, Le Blond, Loan, Lynch, Marhall, Marston, McClurg, McCullough, McKee, Mercur, Mortill, Moulton, Niblack, Nicholson, Noell, Orth, Paine, Patteron, Perham, Phelps, Pomeroy, Price, Radford, Samuel J. Randall, William H. Randall, John H. Rice, Ritter, Rogers, Rollins, Ross, Sawyer, Scofield, Shanklin, Shellabarger, Sit

SUFFRAGE. 115

greaves, Sloan, Smith, Spalding, Starr, Stevens, Strouse, Taber,
Taylor, Thayer, Francis Thomas, John L. Thomas, jr., Thorn-
ton, Trimble, Upson, Van Aernam, Voorhees, Ward, Ellihu
B. Washburne, Welker, Wentworth, Williams, James F.
Wilson, Stephen F. Wilson, Windom, Winfield—117.
The bill was then passed—yeas 116, nays 54,
as follow :
YEAs—Messrs. Alley, Allison, Ames, James M. Ashley,
Baker, Baldwin, Banks, Barker, Baxter, Beaman, Bidwell,
Bingham, Blaine, Blow, Boutwell, Brandegee, Bromwell,
Broomall, Buckland, Bundy, Reader W. Clarke, Sidney,
Clarke, Cobb, Conkling, Cook, Cullom, Darling, Davis, Dawes,
Defrees, Delano, Deming, Dixon, Donnelly, Driggs, Eckley,
Eggleston, Eliot, Farnsworth, Ferry, Garfield, Grinnell,
Griswold, Hale, Abner C. Harding, Hart, Hayes, Higby,
Holmes, Hooper, Asahel W. Hubbard, Demas Hubbard, jr.,
John H. Hubbard, Hulburd, James Humphrey, Ingersoll,
Jenckes, Julian, Kasson, Kelley, Kelso, Ketcham, Laflin,
George W. Lawrence, William Lawrence, Loan, Longyear,
Lynch, Marston, Marvin, McClurg, Mercur, Miller, Moor-
head. Morrill, Morris, Moulton, Myers, O'Neill, Orth, Paine,
Patterson, Perham, Pike, Plants, Pomeroy, Price, Raymond,
Alexander H. Rice, John H. Rice, Rollins, Sawyer, Schenck,
Scofield,_Shellabarger, Sloan, Spalding, Starr, Stevens,
Thayer, Francis Thomas, Trowbridge, Upson, Wan Aernam,
Burt Van Horn, Ward, Warner, Ellihu B. Washburne,
William B. Washburn, Welker, Wentworth, Williams, James
F. Wilson, Stephen F. Wilson, Windom, Woodbridge—116.
NAYs—Messrs. Ancona, Anderson, Delos R. Ashley, Ben-
jamin, Bergen, Boyer, Brooks, Chanler, Dawson, Denison,
Eldridge, Farquhar, Finck, Glossbrenner, Goodyear, Grider,
Harding, Henderson, Hill, IIogan, Chester D. Hubbard, Ed-
win N. Hubbell, James M. Humphrey, Johnson, Jones, Kerr,
Kuykendall, Latham, Le Blond, Marshall, McCullough, Mc-
Kee, Niblock, Nicholson, Noell, Phelps, Radford, Samuel J.
Randall, William H. Randall, Ritter, Rogers, Ross, Shank-
lin, Sitgreaves, Smith, Stillwell, Strouse, Taber, Taylor
Thornton, Trimble, Robert T. Van Horn, Voorhees, 'Winfield

IN SENATE.

June 27, 1866—The bill, as reported to the Senate from its committee amended, was considered, the pending question being Mr. Morrill's motion to insert in the first section the words in brackets, below: That from and after the passage of this act, each and every male person, excepting paupers and persons under guardianship, of the age of twenty-one years and upwards, who has not been convicted of any infamous crime, or offence, and who is a citizen of the United States, and who shall have resided in the said district for the period of six months previous to any election therein, [and excepting persons who may have voluntarily left the District of Columbia to give aid and comfort to the rebels in the late o shall be entitled to the elective franchise, and shall be deemed an elector and entitled to vote at any election in said, District, without any distinction on account of color or race. Mr. Morrill moved further to amend by inserting, also, after “therein,” the words “and who can read the Constitution of the United States in the English language, and write his name;” which was disagreed to—yeas 15, nays 19, as follow: YEAs—Messrs. Anthony, Cragin, Edmunds, Fessenden, Foster, IIarris, Kirkwood, Morrill, Poland, Pomeroy, Sherman, Trumbull, Wade, Willey, Williams—15. NAys—Messrs. Brown, Buckalew, Conness, Davis, Grimes, Guthrie, Hendricks, Howard, Howe, Morgan, Norton, Nye, Ramsey, Sprague, Stewart, Sumner, Wan Winkle, Wilson, Yates—19. Mr. Willey offered this substitute for the bill In all elections to be held hereafter in the District of Columbia, the following described persons and those only, shall have the right to vote, namely: first, all those persons who were actually residents of said District and qualified to vote therein at the elections held therein in the year 1865, under the statutes then in force; second, all persons residents of said District who have been duly mustered into the military or naval service of the United States during the late rebellion, and have been or shall hereafter be honorably discharged therefrom ; third, male citizens of the United States who shall have attained the age of twenty-one years, (excepting paupers, persons non compotes mentis, or convicted of an infamous offence,) and who, being residents of the ward or district in which they shall offer to vote, shall have resided in said District for the period of one year next preceding any election, and who shall have paid the taxes assessed against them, and who can read, and who can write their names.

No further vote has been taken up to date of putting this page to press.

West Virginia Bill.

February 6, 1866—The House passed a joint resolution giving the consent of Congress to the transfer of Berkeley and Jefferson counties to West Virginia—yeas 112, nays 24; (the latter all Democrats except Mr. Baker.) The SENATE passed it, March 6–yeas 32, nays 5–Mr. Johnson, of Maryland, voted aye ; the other Demo. crats, voting, voted nay.

Extending the Homestead Act.
IN Hous E.

February 7, 1866–A bill providing that all the public lands in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Florida, shall be disposed of according to the stipulations of the homestead law of 1862, no entry to be made for more than eighty acres, and no discrimination to be made on account of race or color, and the mineral lands to be reserved, was considered.

Mr. Taber moved to add this proviso:

And provided, also, That nothing in this act shall be so construed as to preclude such persons as have been or shall be pardoned by the President of the United States for their participation in the recent rebellion from the benefit of this act.

Which was disagreed to—yeas 37, nays 104, as follow :

YEAS–Messrs. Delos R. Ashley, Bergen, Boyer, Brooks,

Buckland, Chanler, Eldridge, Finck, Glossbrenner, Grider,

Aaron Harding, Hogan, Chester D. Hubbard, Edwin N.

Hubbell, James M. Humphrey, Kerr, Latham, Le Blond,

Marshall, McCullough, McRuer, Niblack, Nicholson, Noell,

Phelps, Ritter, Rogers, Ross, Shanklin, Sitgreaves, Strouse,

Taber, Taylor, Thayer, Thornton, Trimble, Voorhees—37.

NAYS-Messrs. Alley, Allison, Ames, James M. Ashley,

Baker, Baldwin, Banks, Barker, Baxter, Beaman, Benjamin,

Bidwell, Bingham, Blaine, Blow, Boutwell, Brandegee,

Bromwell, Broomall, Bundy, Reader W. Clarke, Sidney Clarke, Cobb, Conkling, Cook, Cullom, Darling, Davis, Dawes, Defrees, Deming, Donnelly, Driggs, Eckley, Eggleston, Eliot, Farnsworth, Farquhar, Ferry, Garfield, Hale,

Abner, C. Harding, Hart, Isayes, Higby, Hill, Hooper, Hotchkiss, Demas, subbard, jr., John H. Hubbard, Ingersoll, Jenckes, Julian, Kasson, Kelley, Kelso, Kuykendall, Laflin, George W. Lawrence, William Lawrence, Longyear, Lynch, Marston, Marvin, McClurg, McIndoe, Mercur, Miller, Moorhead, Morris, Moulton, Myers, Newell, O'Neill, Orth, Paine, Patterson, Perham, Price, William II. Randali, Alexander H. Rice, John H. Rice, Rollins, Sawyer, Schenck, Sloan, Smith, Spalding, Starr, Stevens, Trowbridge, Upson, Van Aernam, turt Van Horn, Ward, Warner, Elliliu B

James F. Wilson, Stephen F. Wilson, Windom, wood bridge—104. February 8–The bill passed—yeas 112, nay, 29; the latter all Democrats, except Messrs, Driggs and Latham. The bill as finally passed provided that until January 1, 1867, any person applying for the benefit of the act shals swear “ that he has not borne arms against the United States, or given aid and comfort to its enemies.”

Habeas Corpus. IN Hous E.

March 20–The bill to amend an act entitled “An act relating to habeas corpus, and regulat. ing judicial proceedings in certain cases,” approved ... 3, 1863, was passed—yeas 113. nays 31, as follow :

YEAs—Messrs. Alley, Allison, Ames, Anderson, Delos R. Ashley, James M. Ashley, Baker, Baldwin, Banks, Barket. Baxter, Beaman, Bidwell, Bingham, Blaine, Blow, Boutwell, Bromwell, Broomall. Buckland, Bundy, Reader W. Clarke, Conkling, Cook, Cullom, Delano, Deming, Dixon, Driggs Dumont, Eggleston, Eliot, Farnsworth, Farquhar. Ferry, Garfield. Grinnell, Abner C. Harding, Hart, Hayes, Hender. son, Hill, Holmes, Hooper, Asahel W. Hubbard, Chester D. Hubbard, Demas Hubbard, jr., John H. Hubbard, James R. Hubbell, Hulburd, Ingersoll, Jenckes, Kasson, Kelley, Kelso, Retcham, Kuykendall, Laflin, Latham, George W. Lawrence, William Lawrence, Loan, Lynch, Marston, Marvin, McClurg McKee, McRuer, Miller, Moorhead, Morrill, Morris, Moul. ton, Myers, Newell, Noell, O'Neill, Orth, Paine, Perham, Phelps, Pike, Plants, Price, William II. Randall, Raymond, John H. Rice, Rollins, Rousseau, Sawyer, Scofield, Sheila. barger, Sloan, Smith, Stevens, Stillwell, Thayer, Trowbridge, Upson, Van Aernam, Burt Van Horn, Robert T. Van Horn, Ward, Warner, Ellihu B. Washburne, William B. Wasl. burn, Welker, Wentworth, Whaley, Williams, James F. Wilson, Windom, Woodbridge—113. NAYs—Messrs. Ancona, Bergen, Boyer, Brooks, Chanler, Coffroth, Dawson, Eldridge, Glossbrenner, Grider, Hale, Adrom Harding, Hogan, Edwin N. Hubbell, James M. Hum. phrey, Jones, Kerr, Le Blond, Marshall, McCullough, Nicholson, Samuel J. Randall, Ritter, Rogers, Ross, Sitgreaves, Strouse, Taber, Thornton, Trimble, Winfield—31.

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1866, May 15–Pending the bill to amend the organic acts of the territories of Nebraska. Col. orado, Dakota, Montana, Washington, Idaho. Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico, of which this is the ninth section:

“That within the territories aforesaid there shall be no denial of the elective franchià0 to citizens of the United States because of race of color, and all persons shall be equal beford the law. And of acts or parts of acts, either of Congress or the legislative assemblies of the ter. ritories aforesaid, inconsistent with the pro. visions of this act, are hereby declared null and void.”

Mr. Le Blond moved to strike it out, which was

Washburne, William B. Washburn, Welker, Wentworth,

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Union National Platform, June, 1864. Resolved, That it is the highest duty of every American citizen to maintain against all their enemies the integrity of the Union and the paramount authority of the Constitution and laws of the United States; and that, laying aside all differences of political opinions, we pledge ourselves, as Union men, animated by a common sentiment and aiming at a common object, to do everything in our power to aid the Government in quelling by force of arms the Rebellion now raging against its authority, and in bringing to the punishment due to their crimes the Rebels and traitors arrayed against it. Resolved, That we approwe the determination of the Government of the United States not to compromise with Rebels, or to offer them any terms of peace, except such as may be based upon an unconditional surrender of their hostility and a return to their just allegiance to the Constitution and laws of the United States, and that we call upon the Government to maintain this position, and to prosecute the war with the utmost . vigor to the complete suppression of the ebellion, in full reliance upon the self-sacrifiwing patriotism, the heroic valor, and the undying devotion of the American people to the country and its free institutions. Resolved, That as Slavery was the cause, and now constitutes the strength of this Rebellion, and as it must be, always and everywhere, hostile to the principles of Republican Government, justice, o the National safety demand its utter and complete extirpation from the soil of the Republic; and that, while we uphold and maintain the acts and proclamations by which the Government, in its own defence, has aimed a death-blow at this gigantic evil, we are in favor, furthermore, of such an amendment to the Constitution, to be made by the people in conformity with its rovisions, as .." terminate and forever proibit the existence of Slavery within the limits or the jurisdiction of the United States. Resolved, That the thanks of the American people are due to the soldiers and sailors of the Army and Navy, who have periled their lives in

defence of their country and in vindication of the honor of its flag; that the nation owes to them some permanent recognition of their patriotism and i. valor, and ample and permanent provision for those of their survivors who have received disabling and honorable wounds in the service of the country; and that the memories of those who have fallen in its defence shall be held in grateful and everlasting remembrance. Resolved, That we approve and applaud the practical wisdom, the unselfish patriotism, and the unswerving fidelity to the Constitution and the principles of American Liberty, with which Abraham Lincoln has discharged, under circumstances of unparalleled difficulty, the great duties and †: of the Presidential office; that we approve and endorse, as demanded by the emergency and essential to the preservation of the nation and as within the provisions of the Constitution, the measures and acts which he has adopted to defend the nation against its

open and secret foes; that we approve, especial

ly, the Proclamation of Emancipation, and the employment as Union soldiers of men heretofore held in slavery; and that we have full confidence in his determination to carry these and all other Constitutional measures essential to the salvation of the country into full and complete effect. Resolved, That we deem it essential to the general welfare that harmony should prevail in the National Councils, and we regard as worthy of public confidence and official trust those only who cordially endorse the principles proclaimed in these resolutions, and which should characterize the administration of the Government. Resolved, That the Government owes to all men employed in its armies, without regard to distinction of color, the full protection of the laws of war; and that any violation of these laws, or of the usages of civilized nations in time of war, by the Rebels now in arms, should be made the subject of prompt and full redress. . . Resolved, That foreign immigration, which in the past has added so much to the wealth, development of resources, and increase of power to 118

this nation—the asylum of the oppressed of all nations—should be fostered and encouraged by a liberal and just policy.

Resolved, That we are in favor of the speedy construction of the Railroad to the Pacific coast.

Resolved, That the National faith, pledged for the redemption of the public debt, must be kept inviolate, and that for this purpose we recommend economy and rigid responsibility in the public expenditures, and a vigorous and just system of taxation; and that it is the duty of every loyal State to sustain the credit and promote the use of the National currency.

Resolved, That we approve the position taken by the Government that the people of the United States can never regard with indifference the attempt of any European Power to overthrow o force or to supplant by fraud the institutions of any Republican Government on the Western Continent; and that they will view with extreme jealousy, as menacing to the peace and independence of their own country, the efforts of any such power to obtain new footholds for Monarchical Governments, sustained by foreign goy force, in near proximity to the United

tates.

Democratic National Platform, August, 1864.

Resolved, That in the future, as in the past, we will adhere with unswerving fidelity to the Union under the Constitution as the only solid foundation of our strength, security, and happiness as a people, and as a framework of government equally conducive to the welfare and prosperity of all the States, both northern and southern.

Resolved, That this convention does explicitly declare, as the sense of the American people, that after four years of failure to restore the Union by the experiment of war, during which, under the pretence of a military necessity, or war power higher than the Contitution, the Constitution itself has been disregarded in every part, and public liberty and private right alike trodden down and the material prosperity of the country essentially impaired—justice, humanity, liberty and the public welfare demand that immediate efforts be made for a cessation of hostilities, with a view to an ultimate convention of the States, or other peaceable means, to the end that at the earliest practicable moment peace may be restored on the basis of the Federal Union of the States.

Resolved, That the direct interference of the military authorities of the United States in the recent elections held in Kentucky, Maryland,

Missouri, and Delaware, was a shameful viola.

tion of the Constitution; and a repetition of such acts in the approaching election will be held as revolutionary, and resisted with all the means and power under our control. Resolved, That the aim and object of the Democratic party is to preserve the Federal Union and the rights of the States unimpaired; and they hereby declare that they consider that the administrative usurpation of extraordinary and dangerous powers not granted by the constitution; the subversion of the civil by military law in States not in insurrection; the arbitrary military arrest, imprisonment, trial and sentence of

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American citizens in States where civil law exists in full force; the suppression of freedom of speech and of the press; the denial of the right of asylum ; the open and avowed disregard of State rights; the employment of unusual test. oaths, and the interference with and denial of the right of the people to bear arms in their de fence, is calculated to prevent a restoration of the Union and the perpetuation of a governmen: deriving its just powers from the consent of the governed. Resolved, That the shameful disregard of the Administration to its duty in respect to our fel. low-citizens who now are, and long have been, prisoners of war in a suffering condition, de. serves the severest reprobation, on the score alike of public policy and common humanity. Resolved, That the sympathy of the Demo: cratic party is heartily and o extended to the soldiery of our army and sailors of our navy, who are, and have been in the field and on the sea, under the flag of their country; and, in the event of its attaining power, they will receive all the care, protection, and regard that the brave soldiers and sailors of the Republic

have so nobly earned.

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tion of the United States, and the laws passed by

Congress in pursuance thereof supreme, and con: . stant, and universal in their obligation; The rights, the dignity, and the equality of the States in the Union, including the right of rep. resentation in Congress, are solemnly guaranteed by that Constitution, to save . . Overthrow so much blood and treasure were expended in the late civil war; There is no right anywhere to dissolve the Union or to separate States from the Union, either by voluntary withdrawal, by force of arms, or by Congressional action; neither by the secession #. States, nor by the exclusion of their loyal and qualified representatives, nor by the National Government in any other form; Slavery is abolished, and neither can, nor ought to be, re-established in any State or Territory within our jurisdiction; Each State has the undoubted right to pre: scribe the o of its own electors, and no external power rightfully can, or ought to, dictate, control, or influence the free and volun

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