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THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF THE MAPS WHICH WILL COMPOSE THE

COMPANION ATLAS:

1. THE WORLD IN HEMISPHERES, 22. GREECE (MODERN AND ANCIENT).

with comparative Mountain 23. ASIA.

Altitudes, River Systems, etc. 24. TURKISH EMPIRE. 2. THE WORLD ON MERCATOR'S 25. CHINA AND JAPAN.

PROJECTION, with Ocean Cur- 26. HINDOSTAN.
rents, etc.

27. PALESTINE. 3. EUROPE.

28. EAST INDIA ISLANDS, WITH MALAY 4. BRITISH EMPIRE THROUGHOUT

PENINSULA.
THE WORLD, arranged on a new 29. NORTH AMERICA.
principle.

30. UNITED STATES, INCLUDING CALI5. ENGLAND.

FORNIA AND OREGON. 6. SCOTLAND.

31. NORTH EASTERN STATES, on Large 7. IRELAND.

Scale, showing the Railways, 8. RAILWAY MAP OF THE BRITISH

Canals, etc. ISLES, with their stations, and 32. MIDDLE EASTERN STATES, do. the distance of the principal 33. SOUTH EASTERN STATES,

do. Towns from London.

34. CANADAS, WITH NEWFOUNDLAND. 9. FRANCE, WITH PROVINCES, with 35. WEST INDIA ISLANDS. environs of Paris, etc.

36. SOUTH AMERICA. 10. RUSSIAN EMPIRE.

37. CENTRAL AMERICA. 11. RUSSIA IN EUROPE.

38. AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND, 12. GERMANY.

IN THEIR RELATIVE POSITIONS. 13. AUSTRIAN EMPIRE.

39. NEW SOUTH WALES, SOUTH AUSTRA14. PRUSSIAN POSSESSIONS.

LIA, AND VICTORIA. 15. CENTRAL EUROPE, WITH RAILWAYS. 40. ISLANDS IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN. 16 SPAIN AND PORTUGAL.

41. AFRICA. 17. ITALY (NORTH AND SOUTH). 42. BARBARY, INCLUDING MAROCCO AND 18. HOLLAND AND BELGIUM.

ALGIERS. 19. SWEDEN AND NORWAY.

43. CAPE COLONY AND SOUTHERN AF20. DENMARK.

RICA. 21. SWITZERLAND.

The series, it thus appears, will consist of two general maps of the globe; six maps of entire continents; three of states embracing portions of different continents; seventeen of countries pertaining entirely to Europe; seven of portions of countries in America; four of regions lying entirely in Asia; two of these large maps will be devoted to the geography of districts in Africa; and two, besides the general map of Australia and New Zealand, are devoted to portions of that vast region in the Pacific waters which has been designated by the name of Oceania. By these splendid and beautiful Maps, and by other smaller ones not yet decided upon, as well as by the cuts introduced into its text, the publishers anticipate that the GAZETTEER OF THE WORLD and its COMPANION ATLAS, will present together an amount of geographical information, in letterpress and in map illustration, not only not to be found in any work that has hitherto appeared in this country, but unsurpassed in range and scientific character, and unequalled in cheapness, by any other existing Gazetteer and TESTIMONIALS IN FAVOUR OF THE GAZETTEER OF THE WORLD.

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Extract from the Address of Capt. W. H. SMITH, R.N., K. S.F., D.C.L., F.R.S.,

&c., President of the Royal Geographical Society, at the Anniversary Meeting, 27th May, 1850.

If an assumption may be hazarded from the state of the public press, the practice of which is seldom to administer a supply but on demand, the votaries of geography must be on the increase; for not only have we the usual number of narratives of voyages, travels, and explorations, but there is also an unusual proportion of statistical, political, and physical information. Among these, no fewer than four Gazetteers, of a very superior description, have been advertised; and the specimens which I have examined go far to prove that neither industry nor expense will be spared in completing them. The earliest to be finished will probably be the ‘Complete Geographical Dictionary,' by Mr. A. K. Johnston, of Edinburgh, (the efficient editor of the well known Physical Atlas,') which, after years of severe labour, he expects will very shortly make its appearance: it is to contain 46,404 entries of places. In February last, the first part of the “Imperial Cyclopedia of Geography' was published by Mr. Charles Knight. It is professedly intended to accompany the maps published by the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, and is to form four volumes, royal 8vo. Messrs. Blackie and Son have issued a prospectus of a General Gazetteer, to contain about 25,000 names, in which a profusion of small illustrative woodcuts will constitute a prominent feature. THE LAST (THE GAZETTEER OF THE WORLD IS OF STILL HIGHER PRETENSION, AND IF CARRIED OUT ACCORDING TO THE PROMISES OF ITS PROSPECTUS, WILL BE MOST COMPREHENSIVELY USEFUL, CONTAINING THE NAMES OF 100,000 PLACES; IT IS EDITED BY A MEMBER OF OUR SOCIETY, AND PUBLISHED BY A. FULLARTON AND Co., OF EDINBURGH.

From Capt. J. WASHINGTON, R. N., late Secretary of the Royal Geographical Society,

and one of the Admiralty Commissioners for the Survey of Tidal Ports and Harbours in Great Britain and Ireland. I have examined with some care the first part of the “Gazetteer of the World,” just published by Messrs. A. Fullarton & Co. of Edinburgh, and have compared it with other similar works. In geography it is fair to expect that the most recent work should be the best; but it is not only that this Gazetteer contains the latest information, but it has features which, as far as I am aware, are peculiar to itself. Among others which might be mentioned, it scrupulously names the several authorities referred to; it gives small engraved plans of the principal cities; wood-cuts of many noted harbours and remarkable places; and views of the most striking scenery.

The Editor has evidently had access to the latest Admiralty Charts, and to the Surveys of the East India Company, which he has not failed to turn to accourt. For the latitude and longitude of places (the stumbling-block of Gazetteers in general), he has had recourse to Raper's Tables of Positions, unquestionably the highest authority in Europe; and, lastly, he has had the boldness to grapple with the vicious orthography, which has hitherto disfigured all our best Gazetteers, and has reduced Oriental, African, and all unwritten languages to an uniform system, rejecting all redundant consonants and retaining the simple and almost European sound of the vowels.

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These points render the work, in my opinion, immeasurably superior wat other that I am acquainted with, and as such I can confidently recommend it

JOHN WASHINGTON, CAPI. EI

From Professor Rogers, Spring Hill College, Birmingham. I have much pleasure in bearing my testimony to the value of Messrs 4 F larton & Co.'s “Gazetteer of the World,” now in course of publication. I stuck be completed in the style in which it has been commenced, it will bid far the most copious and accurate compilation of the kind ever published: events, within the same compass and the same price. Two features deserves cial notice: the number of Maps and Engravings (both on Steel and Wood); 2. the care with which it has been sought to give some account even of those cier places which are too often excluded from general Gazetteers as too insignificati: notice. Yet it is precisely some special wish for information about such Degies localities that, in the majority of cases, drives the reader to his Gazetteer. T reader of history, or of the daily newspaper, is often condemned to seek the: vain for that very information which it ought to be the object of a general *** reference to supply. Everybody knows a good deal about Paris or London is such places as unexpectedly turned up during the late conflicts between the trians and Magyars, which generally send us to our Gazetteer-and too ofta 1 vain. It is to be hoped that the features in question will continue to characters the work throughout; and if so, it will of itself impart to it no ordinary yalne, compared with general repositories of a similar kind.

HENRY ROGERS

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS. “ The first volume of a new Gazetteer, to be published in parts by A. Fullardan & Co., of Edinburgh, has just made its appearance, and judging by anticipation of the entire work from this specimen, which we have examined, we see no reason to doubt that it will prove a valuable authority for reference on all matters connected with topography. The volume, which hardly exhausts the geographical nomenclature under the letter A, contains a very complete and well-digested body of information, superior in most respects to what is to be found in existing Gazetteers Maps and engravings are resorted to in order to illustrate many of the different subjects treated, and great attention appears to have been paid to points of practical interest, such, for instance, as the statistics of hydrography, upon which the nautical surveys and charts of the Admiralty have been largely consulted by the compilers. With respect to the orthography of places, also (a fertile source of confusion in similar publications), great efforts have been made to establish a uniform system, especially in regard to names in Oriental, African, and unwritten languages, that mode of spelling being adopted which is sanctioned by the Geographical and Asiatic Societies of London, and generally by all the best !uropean writers. Another feature of excellence in the volume before us is the attention paid to ethnography, upon which so much light has recently been thrown by the labours of Humboldt, Duponceau, Prichard, and others.”Times.

“ The aim of the parties concerned in this publication is lofty. They purpose not only to give existence to a good book, but to one which, upon its subject, shall take unquestioned precedence of every other. So far as we have examined the part before us, we must pronounce it in all respects excellent. If the work be completed as commenced, its greater compass of intelligence, its accurate citation of authorities, its handsome appearance, and the beauty of its illustrations, must combine to place it far in advance of any publication of its class.”British Quarrly Review

A. FULLARTON & CO.,
STEAD'S PLACE, EDINBURGH; 106 NEWGATE STREET, LONDON; AND

22 EU'STACE STREET, DUBLIN.

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