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mentioned limits : Provided, however, that the American fishermen shall be admitted to enter such bays or harbours, for the purpose of shelter and of repairing damages therein, of purchasing wood, and of obtaining water, and for no other purpose whatever. But they shall be under such restrictions as may be necessary to prevent their taking, drying, or curing, fish therein, or in any other manner whatever abusing the privileges hereby reserved to them.(1)

Whereas the traffic in slaves is irreconcileable with the principles of humanity and justice ; and whereas, both His Majesty and the United States are desirous of continuing their efforts to promote its entire abolition, it is hereby agreed that both the contracting parties shall use their best endeavours to accomplish so desirable an object.(2)

709. There shall be between the territories of the United States of Ame. rica, and all the territories of his Britannic majesty in Europe, a reciprocal liberty of commerce. The inhabitants of the two countries respectively shall have liberty freely and securely to come with their ships and cargoes to all such places, ports, and rivers, in the territories aforesaid to which other foreigners are permitted to come, to enter into the same, and to remain and reside in any parts of the said territories respectively; also to hire and occupy houses and warehouses for the purposes of their commerce ; and generally the merchants and traders of each nation respectively shall enjoy the most complete protection and security for their commerce, but subject always to the laws and statutes of the two countries respectively.(3)

710. No higher or other duties shall be imposed on the importation into the United States of any articles, the growth, produce, or manufacture of his Britannic majesty's territories in Europe, and no higher or other duties shall be imposed on the importation into the territories of his Britannic majesty in Europe of any articles, the growth, produce, or manufacture of the United States, than are or shall be payable on the like articles being the growth, produce, or manufacture of any other foreign country; nor shall any higher or other duties or charges be imposed in either of the two countries, on the exportation of any articles to the United States, or to his Britannic majesty's territories in Europe, respectively, than such as are payable on the exportation of the like articles to any other foreign country.(4)

711. Nor shall any prohibition be imposed on the exportation or importation of any articles, the growth, produce, or manufacture of the United States, or of his Britannic majesty's territories in Europe, to or from the said territories of his Britannic majesty in Europe, or to or from the said United States, which shall not equally extend to all other nations.(4)

712. No higher or other duties or charges shall be imposed in any of the ports of the United States on British vessels, than those payable in the same ports by vessels of the United States; por in the ports of any of his Britannic majesty's territories in Europe on the vessels of the United States than shall be payable in the same ports on British vessels.(4)

713. The same duties shall be paid on the importation into the United States of any articles, the growth, produce, or manufacture of his Britannic majesty's territories in Europe, whether such importation shall be in vessels of the United States or in British vessels, and the same duties shall be paid on the importation into the ports of any of his Britannic majesty's territories in Europe, of any article, the growth, produce, or manufacture of the United

(1) Convention 20th Oct. 1818, art. 1. (2) Treaty 24th Dec, 1814, art. 10.

(3) Convention with Great Britain, 1815, Art. 1.

(4) Ibid. Art. 2.

States, whether such importation shall be in British vessels or in vessels of the United States.(1)

The same duties shall be paid, and the same bounties allowed on the exportation of any articles, the growth, produce, or manufacture of his Britan. nic majesty's territories in Europe, to the United States, whether such ex. portation shall be in vessels of the United States, or in British vessels ; and the same duties shall be paid, and the same bounties allowed, on the exporta. tion of any articles, the growth, produce, or manufacture of the United States, to his Britannic majesty's territories in Europe, whether such ex. portation shall be in British vessels, or in vessels of the United States.(1)

714. It is further agreed, that in all cases where drawbacks are or may be allowed upon the re-exportation of any goods, the growth, produce, or manufacture of either country respectively, the amount of the said draw. backs shall be the same, whether the said goods shall have been originally imported in a British or an American vessel.(1)

715. But when such re-exportation shall take place from the United States in a British vessel, or from the territories of his Britannic majesty in Europe, in an American vessel, to any other foreign nation, the two contracting par. ties reserve to themselves, respectively, the right of regulating or diminish. ing, in such case, the amount of the said drawback.(1)

716. The intercourse between the United States and his Britannic ma. jesty's possessions in the West Indies, and on the continent of North America, shall not be affected by any of the provisions of this article of convention of 1815.(1)*

717. Whereas, by an act of the congress of the United States, passed on the 29th day of May, one thousand eight hundred and thirty, it is provided,

(1) Convention with Great Britain, 1815, Art. 2.

• The convention of 30 July, 1815, was by the 5th article, limited to five years from the date of its signature ; but was continued for ten years longer by the 4th article of the convention of 20th October, 1818, and was continued indefinitely, by article 1st of the convention of 6th August, 1827. Power being reserved by article 2, to either of the respective parties, to annul the convention on 12 months' notice to the other.

By act passed 3d March, 1823, certain British ports were excepted from the operations of the acts of 18th April, 1818, and 15th May, 1820, and certain principles of intercourse with them were established. The continuance of this exception was made dependent on these ports remaining open; but they having been closed by act of parliament, passed on the 5th July, 1825 ; the president of the United States, pursuant to the authority vested in him by act of 1823, by proclamation, on the 17th March, 1827, declared that trade and intercourse with such ports were prohibited ; and the acts of 18th April, 1818, and 15th May, 1820, were thereby revived in full force, in relation to them.

But congress having passed an act 29th May, 1830, authorizing the president of the United States on the conditions therein set forth, to proclaim the ports of the United States open to British vessels, and their cargoes, and the acts of 1818, 1820, and 1823, to be suspended or repealed as the case might require ; and president Jackson having received satisfactory evidence that, whenever he should give effect to the said act of 29th May, 1830, Great Britain would open for an indefinite period the ports in her colonial possessions designated in the act of 1830, to the ves. sels of the United States, and their cargoes, he issued the proclamation in the text, by virtue of which and the act of 1830, the acts of 1818, 1820, and 1823, were absolutely repealed, and the ports of the United States were from the date of the proclamation, opened to British vessels, and their cargoes, from such colonial ports, upon like terms as to the vessels and cargoes of the United States, and British vessels and their cargoes are admitted to entry in the United States, from the islands, provinces, and colonies of Great Britain, on or near the American continent, and north or east of the United States.

that, whenever the president of the United States shall receive satisfactory evidence that the government of Great Britain will open the ports in its colonial possessions, in the West Indies, on the continent of South America, the Bahama Islands, the Caicos, and the Bermuda or Somer Islands, to the vessels of the United States, for an indefinite or for a limited term;

718. That the vessels of the United States, and their cargoes, on enter. ing the colonial ports aforesaid, shall not be subject to other or higher duties of tonnage or import, or charges of any other description, than would be imposed on British vessels, or their cargoes, arriving in the said colonial possessions from the United States ;

719. That the vessels of the United States may import into the said colonial possessions, from the United States, any article or articles which could be imported in a British vessel into the said possessions, from the United States;

720. And that the vessels of the United States may export from the British colonies aforementioned, to any country whatever, other than the domi. nions or possessions of Great Britain, any article or articles that can be imported therefrom in a British vessel, to any country other than the British dominions or possessions aforesaid ;

721. Leaving the commercial intercourse of the United States with all other ports of the British dominions or possessions on a footing, not less favourable to the United States, than it now is;

722. That then, and in such case, the president of the United States shall be authorized, at any time, before the next session of congress, to issue his proclamation, declaring that he has received such evidence; and that, thereupon, and from the date of such proclamation, the ports of the United States shall be opened, indefinitely, or for a term fixed, as the case may be, to Bri. tish vessels coming from the said British colonial possessions, and their car. goes, subject to no other or higher duty of tonnage or impost, or charge of any description whatever, than would be levied on the vessels of the United States, or their cargoes, arriving from the said British possessions.

723. And it shall be lawful for the said British vessels to import into the United States, and to export therefrom, any article or articles, which may be imported or exported in vessels of the United States; and that the act, entitled, “An act concerning navigation," passed on the eighteenth day of April, one thousand eight hundred and eighteen, an act supplementary thereto, passed the fifteenth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and twenty, and an act entitled “ An act to regulate the commercial intercourse between the United States and certain British ports,” passed on the first day of March, once thousand eight hundred and twenty-three, shall, in such case, be suspended, or absolutely repealed, as the case may require.

724. And whereas, by the said act it is further provided, that whenever the ports of the United States shall have been opened under the authority thereby given, British vessels and their cargoes shall be admitted to an entry in the ports of the United States, from the islands, provinces, or colonies of Great Britain, on or near the North American continent, and north or east of the United States.

725. And whereas satisfactory evidence has been received by the presi. dent of the United States, that, whenever he shall give effect to the provisions of the act aforesaid, the government of Great Britain will open for an indefinite period, the ports in its colonial possessions in the West Indies, on the continent of South America, the Bahama islands, the Caicos, and the Bermuda or Somer islands, to the vessels of the United States, and their

cargoes, upon the terms, and according to the requisitions, of the aforesaid act of congress :

726. Now, therefore, I, Andrew Jackson, president of the United States of America, do hereby declare and proclaim, that such evidence has been received by me; and that, by the operation of the act of congress passed on the twenty-ninth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and thirty, the ports of the United States are, from the date of this proclamation, open to British vessels coming from the said British possessions, and their cargoes, upon the terms set forth in the said act:

727. The act, entitled “An act concerning navigation," passed on the eighteenth day of April, one thousand eight hundred and eighteen, the act supplementary thereto, passed the fifteenth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and twenty, and the act entitled “An act to regulate the commer. cial intercourse between the United States and certain British ports,” passed the first day of March, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-three, are absolutely repealed ; and British vessels and their cargoes are admitted to an entry in the ports of the United States, from the islands, provinces, and colonies of Great Britain, on or near the North American continent, and north or east of the United States :(1)

728. His Britannic majesty agrees that the vessels of the United States of America shall be admitted and hospitably received at the principal settlements of the British dominions of the East Indies, videlicet: Calcutta, Madras, Bombay, and the Prince of Wales' island, and that the citizens of the said United States may freely carry on trade between the said principal settlements and the said United States, in all articles of which the importation and exportation, respectively, to and from the said territories, shall not be entirely prohibited; provided only, that it shall not be lawful for them, in any time of war between the British government and any state or power whatever, to export from the said territories, without the special permission of the British government, any military stores, or naval stores, or rice.(2)

729. The citizens of the United States shall pay for their vessels, when admitted, no higher or other duty or charge than shall be payable on the ves. sels of the most favoured European nations, and they shall pay no higher or other duties or charges on the importation or exportation of the cargoes of the said vessels, than shall be payable on the same articles when imported or exported in the vessels of the most favoured European nations.(2)

730. But it is expressly agreed, that the vessels of the United States shall pot carry any articles from the said principal settlements to any port or place, except to some port or place in the United States of America, where the same shall be unladen.(2)

731. It is also understood, that the permission granted by this article is Dot to extend to allow the vessels of the United States to carry on any part of the coasting trade of the said British territories; but the vessels of the United States, having, in the first instance, proceeded to one of the said prin. cipal settlements of the British dominions in the East Indies, and then going with their original cargoes, or part thereof, from one of the said princi. pal settlements to another, shall not be considered as carrying on the coasting irade.(2)

732. The vessels of the United States may also touch for refreshment, but not for commerce, in the course of their voyage to or from the British territories in India, or to or from the dominions of the emperor of China, at

(1) President's proclamation, 5th Oct.

() Convention, 1815, Art. 3.

the cape of Good Hope, the island of St. Helena, or such other places as may be in the possession of Great Britain, in the African or Indian seas; it being well understood that in all that regards this article, the citizens of the United States shall be subject, in all respects, to the laws and regulations of the British government from time to time established.(1)

733. Each of the contracting parties may appoint consuls for the protection of trade, to reside in the dominions and territories of the other party.(2)

734. But before any consul shall act as such, he shall in the usual form be approved and admitted, by the government to which he is sent.

735. In case of illegal or improper conduct, towards the laws or government of the country to which he is sent, such consul may either be punished according to law, if the laws will reach the case, or be sent back, the offend. ed government assigning to the other the reasons therefor.(2)

736. Either of the contracting parties may except from the residence of consuls, such particular places as such party shall judge fit to be so ex. cepted.(2)

CHAPTER II.

OF RELATIONS WITH FRANCE.**

Twenty-five millions francs appro. goods for transit or re-exportation

priated to indemnify citizens of not to pay discriminating duty 742

U. S.-time of payment, interest 737 Definition of ton of merchandise 743 One and a half millions appropriated Duties of tonnage, &c. in either to indemnify citizens of France

country

744 how payable, interest

738 Provision relative to deserters from Provision for certain reclamations of vessels

745 the citizens of the two countries 739 Duration of this convention

746

W convention Documents to be communicated by Progressive diminution of duty

the respective governments 740 Specific duty on wines-duty on Duty on American products import

cotton

748 ed in American vessels into Provision for arrest of seamen deFrance

serting from French vessels-duDuty on French products in French ration of this provision

749 vessels in the United States

747

741

Art. 737. The French government, in order to liberate itself completely from all the reclamations preferred against it by citizens of the United States,

(1) Convention 1815, Art. 3.

(2) Ibid. Art. 4.

• The first treaty made with a foreign power by the United States, was with France, at Paris, 6th of February, 1778, at which time a treaty of alliance was also formed with her. A convention for the loan of money was made with her on the 16th of July, 1782. A consular convention was entered into on the 14th of November, 1788; the duration of which was fixed at twelve years.

By act of congress, 7th of July, 1798, the 1st, 2d, and 4th, of the foregoing treaties were annulled, upon the allegation that they had been repeatedly violated by the French government, that reparation had been refused, and attempts to negotiate an adjustment of differences had been repelled with indignity, and that there was then pursued against the United States by France, a system of predatory violence. Open hostility succeeded this act, which was terminated by the convention of 1801, limited to eight years.

The treaty of cession of Louisiana was signed at Paris, 30th of April, 1803, and

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