Faith and Doubt: Religion and Secularization in Literature from Wordsworth to Larkin

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Mercer University Press, 1997 - 261 páginas
"This major new work from a leading authority touches on issues that are increasingly pertinent to the world today. Pairing great writers from each generation who typify the contrasts and concerns of their age, Professor Brett explores the complex interplay between faith and doubt in English literature since the Enlightenment. Not confining himself to a biographical and historical approach, he deploys his understanding of contemporary philosophy and ideology to throw a new light on often neglected areas."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Contenido

Wordsworth and Coleridge
6
Carlyle and Arnold
54
George Eliot and Dickens
84
Tennyson and Browning
125
Yeats and Eliot
161
Auden and Larkin
205
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Página 25 - Unwearied in that service : rather say With warmer love — oh ! with far deeper zeal Of holier love. Nor wilt thou then forget, That after many wanderings, many years Of absence, these steep woods and lofty cliffs, And this green pastoral landscape, were to me More dear, both for themselves and for thy sake ! LINES WRITTEN IN EARLY SPRING.
Página 140 - Are God and Nature then at strife, That Nature lends such evil dreams? So careful of the type she seems, So careless of the single life...
Página 28 - Lyrical Ballads, in which it was agreed that my endeavours should be directed to persons and characters supernatural, or at least romantic — yet so as to transfer from our inward nature a human interest and a semblance of truth sufficient to procure for these shadows of imagination that willing suspension of disbelief, for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith.
Página 128 - Not in vain the distance beacons. Forward, forward let us range, Let the great world spin for ever down the ringing grooves of change.
Página 46 - Keen pangs of Love, awakening as a babe Turbulent, with an outcry in the heart; And fears self-willed, that shunned the eye of Hope; And Hope that scarce would know itself from Fear; Sense of past Youth, and Manhood come in vain, And Genius given, and Knowledge won in vain...
Página 175 - I am content to follow to its source Every event in action or in thought; Measure the lot; forgive myself the lot! When such as I cast out remorse So great a sweetness flows into the breast We must laugh and we must sing, We are blest by everything, Everything we look upon is blest.
Página 72 - Sunk, then, is Europe's sagest head. Physician of the iron age, Goethe has done his pilgrimage. He took the suffering human race, He read each wound, each weakness clear; And struck his finger on the place, And said : Thou ailest here, and here...
Página 148 - The counter our lovers staked was lost As surely as if it were lawful coin : And the sin I impute to each frustrate ghost Is — the unlit lamp and the ungirt loin.
Página 28 - Wordsworth, on the other hand, was to propose to himself as his object, to give the charm of novelty to things of every day, and to excite a feeling analogous to the supernatural, by awakening the mind's attention from the lethargy of custom, and directing it to the loveliness and the wonders of the world before us...

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