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Enteben according to Act of Congress, in the year 1860, by TIIE TRIBUNE ASSOCIATION, In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York.

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The. single end of this book is the presentation, in a compact and convenient form, of the more important facts, votes, resolves, letters, speeches, reports and other documents, which elucidate the political contest now agitating this country. It has been our aim to let every candidate and other important personage speak for himself, make his own platform, and vindicate (if he may) his own consistency and the soundness of his views on the great questions which underlie our current politics.

Of course, such a work can have but a comparative merit. Make it ever so large, and still many things must be omitted that the compiler would wish to insert; and every critic will plausibly ask, "Why insert this and omit that? Why give so much of A. and so little of B.?" Beside, it is not always possible to remember, or, if remembered, to find, all that would be valued in a work like this. We can only say that we have done our best: let him do better who can.

Inaccuracy of citation is one of the chief vices of our- political discussions. You can hardly listen to a set speech, even from a well-informed and truthful canvasser, which is not marred by some misapprehension or unconscious misstatement of the position and views of this or that prominent statesman. Documents, heedlessly read and long since lost or mislaid, are quoted from with fluency and confidence, as though with indubitable accuracy, when the citations so made do gross injustice to their author, and tend to mislead the hearer. We believe the documents collected in this work are so printed that 'their general accuracy may be safely relied on.

By canvassers of all parties, we trust our Text-Book will be found convenient, not to say indispensable. But those who only listen, and read, and reflect, will also find it a manifest help to a clear understanding of the issues and contentions of the day. They will be interested in comparing the actual positions taken by Mr. Lincoln, or Mr. Douglas, or Gen. Cass, or Mr. Everett, as faithfully set forth in this work, with those confidently attributed to that statesman in the fluent harangue of some political opponent, who is intent on blazoning his inconsistency or proving his insincerity. To verify and correct

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It ADVERTISEMENT.

the citations of a frothy declaimer is sometimes the easiest and most convincL "tig refutation of his speech.' If a trace of partisan bias is betrayed in the thread of narrative which partially unites the successive reports, bills, votes, etc., presented in this work, the error is unintentional and regretted. Our purpose was to compile a record acceptable and convenient to men of all parties, and which might be consulted and trusted by all. Whatever is original herein is regarded as of no use or merit, save as a necessary elucidation of the residue. Without apology, therefore, or further explanation, the Text-Book is commended to the favor of the' American public.

New-yorr, August 1«<, I860.

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ADAMs, Charles FRANCIS, of Massachusetts,

President Buffalo Convention, 1848; Nominee of

do. for Vice-President............... ------------

ADAMs, Governor, of South Carolina, re-
commends in a Message the reopening of the Afri-
can Slave-Trade............ --------------------
ADAMs, John, of Massachusetts, chosen
President 1796–7: Rečlection defeated 1800–1....

Atchison, DAVID R., of Missouri, beaten
for Vice-President in Democratic Convention, 1852

BANKs, NATHANIEL P., of Massachusetts,
defeated for Vice-President in Rep. Conv., 1856...
Supported for Vice-President in Republican
tional Convention, 1860.....................

BATEs, Edward, of Missouri, President

Whig National Convention, 1856.................

Candidate for President before Republican Con-

vention, 1860...............................

Letter to the Missouri delegates to the Republi-
can Convention.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......... -
His letter in support of Lincoln and Hamlin..

BARBour, PHILIP P., of Virginia, beaten

for Vice-President..............................

BARbour, JAMEs, of Virginia, President

first National Republican Convention........ .. -

President Whig National Convention, 1839.....

RNBURNERs of New-York retire from De-

ocratic National Convention.................. -

Nominate Van Buren and Dodge for Presiden

and Vice-President.................. --------

RTLETT, G. B., of Kentucky, President

American National Council, 1856........... - - - - -

#AYARD, JAMEs A., of Delaware, defeated

"for Vice-President in Democratic Convention, 1856

Presides over Seceders' Convention at Charles-

ton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ----

12

173
210

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ular Sovereignty................................ 194

His opinion of Douglas.... 196

BIRNEY, JAMEs G., of Michigan, Abolition

candidate for President in 1840.................. 12

Liberty Party candidate for President in 1844. 14

Bonham, MILLIDGE L., of South Carolina,

for Dissolution....................... --- - - - - - - - - 172

Boyd, LINN, of Kentucky, defeated for

Vice-President by Democratic Convention, 1856. 24

BRECKINRIDGE, John C., of Kentucky,

nominated Vice-President b

vention, 1856............................. 24

Elected Wice-President 1856............. ... 22

Speech on General Politics at Frankfort Ky.,

in 1859.................................... 149

Gives casting vote against Free Homestead bill 187

Accepts nomination for Presidency............ 211

BRONson, Judge GREENE C., on Slavery,

letter affirming Slavery to exist only by positive

law.......................... ------------------ 208

BRow N, AARON W., of Tennessee, de-

feated for Wice-President in Democratic Conven-

tion 1856..... .............. -------------- - - - - 24

BUCHANAN, JAMEs, of Pennsylvania, beaten

for President in Democratic Convention, 1844.... 13

Beaten for President in Democratic Conven-

tion, 1848.... ....... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ..... 16

Nominated for President by Democratic Con-

vention, 1856............................... 24

Elected President of the United States, 1856. 22

Message on Lecompton....

Special message on do...

Veto of Homestead bill....................... 191

BURR, AARON, chosen Vice-President,

1800–1... .................... ..... ............ 9

ButleR, WILLIAM 0., of Kentucky, Demo-

cratic nominee and defeated candidate for Vice-

President, 1848... ................ .... ------- . 16

Defeated for President and Vice-President in

Democratic National Convention, 1852...... 20

CALhoun, John C., of South Carolina,
elected Vice-President in 1824, and reelected in
828............... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ... 10

CAMBRELENG, C. C., of N. Y. on Slavery... 204

CAMERON, Gen. SIMON, of Pennsylvania,

candidate for President before Republican Na-

tional Convention, 1860 .... ................... 27

CAMPBELL, LEwis D., of Ohio, offers a re-
solve in Whig National Convention, 1848........ 15

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Clingman, Thomas L., of North Carolina,

for Dissolution 172

Clinton, De Witt, defeated for President

Clinton, George, choseu Vice-President,

1804

Cochrane, John, of New-York, presents

Anti-Slavery Resolves to Mass Meetings 207

Constitdtional Union Convention, 1860 29

Crawporn, Maryin J., for Dissolution 172

Crawporn, William H., of Georgia, beaten

in Democratic Caucus for President in 1816;

Democratic Caucus candidate for President, 1824 9

Beaten for President 1824. 10

Curry, J. L. M., of Alabama, for Dissolu-

tion 172

Cushino, Gen. Caleb, of Massachusetts,

President of Democratic National Convention,

1860 29

Retires from the chair at Baltimore 47

Presides over the Seceders' Convention at Bal-

timore 48

Dallas, George M., of Pennsylvania, nomi-

nated for and elected Vice-President, 1844 18

Davis, Garrett, of Kentucky, defeated for

President in the American National Convention... 28

Davis Jeppeeson, of Mississippi, supported,

1860, for President in National Democratic Con-

vention 41

His resolutions as they passed the Senate 194

Davis, John, of Massachusetts, defeated for

Vice-President in Whig National Convention, 1844. 18

Davis, John W., of Indiana, President De-

mocratic National Convention, 1852 20

Dayton, William L., of New-Jersey, Re-

publican nominee for Vice-President, 1856; de-

feated therefor 22

Dejaenette, Daniel C, of Virginia, for Dis-

solution 172

Delaware Declares for Free Territories

through Legislative resolves in 1820

Also in 1849

Democracy Op Maine for the Wilmot Pro-

viso'

Democratic National Conventions.—First

at Baltimore in 1882 10

Second at Baltimore in 1885 11

Third Democratic National Convention, 1640... 12

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Fourth Democratic National Convention, 1844 ..

Fifth Democratic National Convention, 1848

Sixth Democratic National Convention, 1852

Seventh Democratic National Convention, 1856 .

Eighth Democratic National Convention, 1860 ..

Mr. Avery's (N. C.) Majority Report, from Com-
mittee on Platform; Mr. H. B. Payne's Mi-
nority Report from Committee on Platform;
Senator Wm. Blgler's Compromise proposition 80
Mr. Avery's amended Majority Report; Mr.
Avery's remarks in favor of same; Mr. H. B.

Payne of Ohio in reply SI

His extracts from Breckinridge, Orr, and Ste-

phens; Mr. Samuels's (of Iowa) Minority Re-

port 82

Minority Report adopted, 165 to 188; Alabama

protests and withdraws 88

Mississippi withdraws 84

South Carolina, Florida, and Texas withdraws... 86

Arkansas retires 87

Georgia retires 88

Louisiana withdraws; Speech of Wm. B. Gaulden

of Georgia in favor of the Slave-Trade 89

Fruitless ballots (57) for President; Adjournment

to Baltimore; The Seceders at Charleston; Se-

nator Bayard, of Delaware, Chairman; They

adopt the Avery Platform 41

They adjourn to Richmond; They meet at Rich-

mond June 11; They finally adopt Breckin-

ridge and Lane; The adjourned Convention at

timore; Gen. Cushing's opening Speech 42

Mr. Howard, of Tennessee, moves admission of
original Delegates; Mr. Kavanagh, of Minne-
sota, moves to lay on table; Previous question

defeated 48

Proposition of Mr. S. E. Church, of New-York;

Report of Committee on Credentials 44

Minority Report of do.; Admission of Douglas

Delegates from Louisiana and Alabama 45

Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Maryland

and California withdraw 46

Delaware, and part of Kentucky, and Missouri

withdraw; Gen. Cushing resigns the Chair;

Gen. Butler, of Massachusetts, oilers a pro-

test 41

Democratic Platporm (Davis's Resolu-

tions), adopted by the United States Senate, affirm-

ing the duty of Congress to establish a Slave Code

in the Territories 194

Dicrinson, Daniel S., of New-York, sup-

ported for President in Democratic National Con-

vention, 1860 41

Dix, Gen. John A., advocates Freedom
for the Territories in the United States 207

Disunion Avowen by Southern Statesmen

in the event of the election of a Republican Presi-

dent 170

Dobbin, James C, of North Carolina, beaten

for Vice-President in Democratic National Conven-

tion, 1856 24

Donge, Gen. Henry, of Wisconsin, nomi-

nated for Vice-President by New-York Radicals in

1848, but declined 17

Donelson, Annrew J., of Tennessee, nomi-

nated for Vice-President by American Convention. 28

Indorsed by Whig National Convention, 1866 ... 25

Douglas, Stephrn A., of Illinois, beaten

for President in Democratic Couvenlion, 1852... 20

Beaten for President in Democratic Conven-

tion, 1856 24

Nominated at Baltimore in 1S60 43

Proposes to extend the Missouri Compromise to

the Pacific 74

Mr. Douglas' reply to Lincoln at Freeport 1HO

Mr. Douglas' "Harper" Essay on Popular So-

vereignty in the Territories 182

Speech at Springfield, III.. June 12, 1857 154

Speech on the John Brown raid, July 16, 1860,

proposing a Sedition Law 158

He tells what Popular Sovereignty has done for

Slavery 159

Accepts Nomination for Presidency 212

Extract from Speech in favor of Missouri Com-

promise 215_

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