Memorial Addresses on the Life and Character of Alpheus S. Williams, (a Representative from Michigan,)

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1880 - 102 páginas

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Página 54 - Oh, why should the spirit of mortal be proud? Like a swift-fleeting meteor, a fast-flying cloud, A flash of the lightning, a break of the wave, Man passes from life to his rest in the grave.
Página 46 - So the multitude goes, like the flower or the weed, That withers away to let others succeed ; So the multitude comes, even those we behold, To repeat every tale that has often been told.
Página 100 - And he shall judge among the nations, and shall rebuke many people: and they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruninghooks: nation shall not lift up sword against nation neither shall they learn war any more.
Página 74 - There is no death ! What seems so is transition : This life of mortal breath Is but a suburb of the life elysian, Whose portal we call Death.
Página 64 - Why weep ye then for him, who, having won The bound of man's appointed years, at last, Life's blessings all enjoyed, life's labors done, Serenely to his final rest has passed; While the soft memory of his virtues, yet, Lingers like twilight hues, when the bright sun is set...
Página 54 - tis the draught of a breath From the blossom of health to the paleness of death, From the gilded saloon to the bier and the shroud ; O, Why should the spirit of mortal be proud ~>. — William Knox.
Página 64 - Ye sigh not when the sun, his course fulfilled, His glorious course, rejoicing earth and sky, In the soft evening, when the -winds are stilled, Sinks where his islands of refreshment lie, And leaves the smile of his departure, spread O'er the warm-colored heaven and ruddy mountain head.
Página 96 - But yesterday the word of Caesar might Have stood against the world : now lies he there, And none so poor to do him reverence.
Página 91 - Lives of great men all remind us We can make our lives sublime, And, departing, leave behind us, Footprints on the sands of time; Footprints, that perhaps another, Sailing o'er life's solemn main, A forlorn and shipwrecked brother, Seeing, shall take heart again.
Página 46 - Death hath made no breach In love and sympathy, in hope and trust ; No outward sign or sound our ears can reach, But there's an inward, spiritual speech, That greets us still, though mortal tongues be dust.

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