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INTERNATIONAL RULES

INLAND RULES shall keep out of the way of the shall keep out of the way of the overtaken vessel.

overtaken vessel. Every vessel coming up with Every vessel coming up with another vessel from any direction another vessel from any direction more than two points abaft her more than two points abaft her beam, that is, in such a position, beam, that is, in such a position, with reference to the vessel which with reference to the vessel which she is overtaking that at night she she is overtaking that at night she would be unable to see either of would be unable to see either of that vessel's side lights, shall be that vessel's side lights, shall be deemed to be an overtaking vessel ; deemed to be an overtaking vesand no subsequent alteration of sel; and no subsequent alteration the bearing between the two ves of the bearing between the two sels shall make the overtaking ves- vessels shall make the overtaking sel a crossing vessel within the vessel a crossing vessel within the meaning of these rules, or relieve meaning of these rules, or relieve her of the duty of keeping clear her of the duty of keeping clear of of the overtaken vessel until she is the overtaken vessel until she is finally past and clear.

finally past and clear. As by day the overtaking vessel A8 by day the overtaking vessel can not always know with cer- can not always know with certainty whether she is forward of tainty whether she is forward of or abaft this direction from the or abaft this direction from the other vessel she should, if in other vessels she should, if in doubt, assume that she is an over- doubt, assume that she is an overtaking vessel and keep out of the taking vessel and keep out of the way.

way.

NARROW CHANNELS

NARROW CHANNELS

ART. 25. In narrow channels ART. 25. In narrow channels every steam vessel shall, when it every steam vessel shall, when it is safe and practicable, keep to is safe and practicable, keep to that side of the fairway or mid- that side of the fairway or midchannel which lies on the star-channel which lies on the starboard side of such vessel.

board side of such vessel.

RIGHT OF WAY OF FISHING VESSELS

RIGHT OF WAY OF FISHING VESSELS

ART. 26. Sailing vessels under ART. 26. Sailing vessels under way shall keep out of the way of way shall keep out of the way of sailing vessels or boats fishing sailing vessels or boats fishing with nets, or lines, or trawls. with nets, lines, or trawls. This This rule shall not give to any rule shall not give to any vessel or vessel or boat engaged in fishing boat engaged in fishing the right the right of obstructing a fairway of obstructing a fairway used by used by vessels other than fishing vessels other than fishing vessels vessels or boats.

or boats.

GENERAL PRUDENTIAL RULE

GENERAL PRUDENTIAL RULE

ART. 27. In obeying and constru- ART. 27. In obeying and construing these rules due regard shall being these rules due regard shall be

INTERNATIONAL RULES

INLAND RULES had to all dangers of navigation had to all dangers of navigation and collision, and to any special and collision, and to any speciai circumstances which may render a circumstances which may render a departure from the above rules departure from the above rules necessary in order to avoid imme- necessary in order to avoid immediate danger.

diate danger.

SOUND SIGNALS FOR PASSING

STEAMERS

SOUND SIGNALS FOR PASSING

STEAMERS

ART. 28. The words “short blast" [See article eighteen.] used in this article shall mean a blast of about one second's duration.

When vessels are in sight of one another, a steam vessel under way in taking any course authorized or required by these rules, shall indicate that course by the following signals, on her whistle or siren, namely:

One short blast to mean, “I am directing my course to starboard.” Two short blasts to mean, “I am

ART. 28. When vessels are in directing my course to port." sight of one another a steam vessel

Three short blasts to mean, “My under way whose engines are goengines are going at full speed ing at full speed astern shall indiastern."

cate that fact by three short blasts on the whistle.

PRECAUTION

PRECAUTION

ART. 29. Nothing in these rules

ART. 29. Nothing in these rules shall exonerate any vessel, or the shall exonerate any vessel, or the owner or master or crew thereof, owner or master or crew thereof, from the consequences of any from the

from the consequences of any neglect to carry lights or signals, neglect to carry lights or signals, or of any neglect to keep a proper or of any neglect to keep a proper lookout, or of the neglect of any lookout, or of the neglect of any precaution which may be required precaution which may be required by the ordinary practice of sea- by the ordinary practice of seamen, or by the special circum- men, or by, the special circumstances of the case.

stances of the case. ART. 30. [See page 1.]

LIGHTS ON UNITED STATES NAVAL

VESSELS AND REVENUE CUTTERS

ART. 30. The exhibition of any light on board of a vessel of war of the United States or a Coast Guard cutter may be suspended whenever, in the opinion of the Secretary of

INTERNATIONAL RULES

INLAND RULES the Navy, the commander in chief of a squadron, or the commander of a vessel acting singly, the special character of the service may require it.

DISTRESS SIGNALS

DISTRESS SIGNALS

ART. 31. When a vessel is in ART. 31. When a vessel is in distress and requires assistance distress and requires assistance from other vessels or from the from other vessels or from the shore the following shall be the shore the following shall be the signals to be used or displayed by signal to be used or displayed by her, either together or separately, her, either together or separately, namely:

namely: In the daytime

In the daytimeFirst. A gun or other explo- A continuous sounding with sive signal fred at intervals of any fog-signal apparatus, or firing about a minute.

a gun. Second. The international code signal of distress indicated by NC.

Third. The distance signal, consisting of a square flag, having either above or below it a ball or anything resembling a ball.

Fourth. A continuous sounding with any fog-signal apparatus. At night,

At night, First. A gun or other explo- First. Flames on the vessel as sive signal fired at intervals of from a burning tar barrel, oil about a minute.

barrel, and so forth. Second. Flames on the vessel Second. A continuous sounding (as from a burning tar barrel, oil with any fog-signal apparatus, or barrel, and so forth).

firing a gun. Third. Rockets or shells throwing stars of any color or description, fired one at a time, at short intervals.

Fourth. A continuous sounding 'with any fog-signal apparatus.

ORDERS TO HELMSMEN

ORDERS TO HELMSMEN

ART. 32. All orders to helms- ART. 32. All orders to helmsmen shall be given as follows: men shall be given as follows:

"Right Rudder” to mean "Di- "Right Rudderto mean "Direct the vessel's head to star-rect the vessel's head to starboard."

board."Left Rudder” to mean “Di- Left Rudderto mean Direct rect the vessel's head to port.” the vessel's head to port.

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ACT OF SEPTEMBER 4, 1890, IN REGARD TO COLLISIONS AT SEA, THAT

WENT INTO EFFECT DECEMBER 15, 1890

By the President of the United States of America

A proclamation Whereas an act of Congress in regard to collisions at sea was approved September 4, 1890, the said act being in the following words:

"Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That in every case of collision between two vessels it shall be the duty of the master or person in charge of each vessel, if and so far as he can do so without serious danger to his own vessel, crew, and passengers (if any), to stay by the other vessel until he has ascertained that she has no need of further assistance, and to render to the other vessel, her master, crew, and passengers (if any) such assistance as may be practicable and as may be necessary in order to save them from any danger caused by the collision, and also to give to the master or person in charge of the other vessel the name of his own vessel and her port of registry, or the port or place to which she belongs, and also the name of the ports and places from which and to which she is bound. If he fails so to do, and no reasonable cause for such failure is shown, the collision shall, in the absence of proof to the contrary, be deemed to have been caused by his wrongful act, neglect, or default.

“Sec. 2. That every master or person in charge of a United States vessel who fails, without reasonable cause, to render such assistance or give such information as aforesaid shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall be liable to a penalty of one thousand dollars, or imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years; and for the above sum the vessel shall be liable and may be seized and proceeded against by process in any district court of the United States by any person; one-half such sum to be payable to the informer and the other to the United States.

"SEC. 3. That this act shall take effect at a time to be fixed by the President by Proclamation issued for that purpose.”.

And whereas it is provided by section 3 of the said act that it shall take effect at a time to be fixed by the President by proclamation issued for that purpose:

Now, therefore, I, Benjamin Harrison, President of the United States of America, do hereby, in virtue of the authority vested in me by section 3 of the said act, proclaim the fifteenth day of December, 1890, as the day on which the said act shall take effect.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this eighteenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and fifteenth. [SEAL]

BENJ. HARRISON. By the President:

JAMES G. BLAINE, Secretary of State. 1 26 Stat. 425 ; 33 U. S. C. 367, 368.

MOTORBOAT ACT OF APRIL 25, 1940

AN ACT TO AMEND LAWS FOR PREVENTING COLLISIONS OF VESSELS, TO REGU

LATE THE EQUIPMENT OF CERTAIN MOTORBOATS ON THE NAVIGABLE WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES

Motorboat defined; inspection

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the word "motorboat” where used in this Act shall include every vessel propelled by machinery and not more than sixty-five feet in length except tugboats and towboats propelled by steam. The length shall be measured from end to end over the deck, excluding sheer: Provided, That the engine, boiler, or other operating machinery shall be subject to inspection by the local inspectors 1 steam vessels, and to their approval of the design thereof, on all said motorboats, which are more than forty feet in length, and which are propelled by machinery driven by steam.

Classes of motorboats SEC. 2. Motorboats subject to the provisions of this Act shall be divided into four classes as follows:

Class A. Less than sixteen feet in length.
Class 1. Sixteen feet or over and less than twenty-six feet in length.
Class 2. Twenty-six feet or over and less than forty feet in length.

Class 3. Forty feet or over and not more than sixty-five feet in length.

Lights

SEC. 3. Every motorboat in all weathers from sunset to sunrise shall carry and exhibit the following lights when under way, and during such time no other lights which may be mistaken for those prescribed shall be exhibited:

(a) Every motorboat of classes A and 1 shall carry the following lights: First. A bright white light aft to show all around the horizon.

Second. A combined lantern in the fore part of the vessel and lower than the white light aft, showing green to starboard and red to port, so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on their respective sides.

(b) Every motorboat of classes 2 and 3 shall carry the following lights:

First. A bright white light in the fore part of the vessel as near the stem as practicable, so constructed as to show an unbroken light

1 Local inspectors have been abolished by order of the Commandant, U. S. Coast Guard. and are replaced by Officers in Charge, Marine Inspection,

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