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Selective Service System. 1946-No. 3, transferring functions of
Small Business Administration. 1954–No. 2, transfer of functions to. 1957-

No.1, transfer of functions to
Smithsonian Institution. 1946—No. 3, transferring functions to
Social Security Board. 1939—No. 1, transfer of. 1946—No. 2, transfer of, to

Federal Security Agency Social Welfare, Department of. 1937-establishment of, recommended by Presi

dent's Committee on Administrative Management Soil Conservation Service. 1939 No. 4, transfer of functions of Solicitor of the Department of Commerce. 1933— E.O. 6166, transfer of Solicitor of the Department of Labor. 1933—E.O. 6166, transfer of. 1950_No.

6. position of, in Department of Labor Solicitor of the Treasury. 1933—E.0. 6166, transfer of Southwestern Power Administration. 1950_No. 3, position of, in Department

of the Interior Standards, Bureau of. 1946—No. 3, transferring functions of. 1950—No. 5,

position of, in Department of Commerce Standards, Division of Commercial. 1946—No. 3, transfer of functions of State, Department of. 1933—E.O. 6166, transfer of functions to. 1939—No. 2,

transfer of functions to. 1939—No. 4, transfer of functions to. 1946-No. 1,

transfer of functions to. 1950—No. 20 transfer of functions of Supervising Architect of the Treasury. 1933—E.O. 6166, transferring Surety Bonds, Section of. 1939—No. 3, transfer of Surplus Marketing Administration. 1939 – No. 3, establishment of Surplus Property Administration. 1947—No. 1, changing name of, to War Assets

Administration Territories and Island Possessions, Division of. 1933—E.O. 6166, established.

1939 — No. 4, transfer of functions of. 1950—No. 3, position of, in the Depart

ment of the Interior Trade Practices, Division of Simplified. 1946—No. 3, transfer of functions of Treasury, Department of the. 1932—E.O. 5966, establishing unified border patrol

in. 1932-E.0. 5967, transfer of functions of. 1933—E.O. 6166, establishing Procurement Division in, E.O. 6166, transfer of functions of. 1939—No. 1, transferring Bureau of the Budget from. 1939—No. 2, transfer of functions to. 1939_-No. 3, establishing Fiscal Service in. 1939—No. 4, relating to the powers of. 1947—No. 1, transfer of functions to. 1950—No. 1 to strengthen the position of the Secretary, and consolidate functions. 1950—No. 26, trans

ferring certain functions of. 1957—No. 1, transferring certain functions to I'.S. Court for China. 1933—E.O. 6166, transfer of L'.S. Employment Service. 1946—No. 3, transferring functions to. 1947—No.

2, transferring functions of, to Department of Labor U.S. Film Service, National Emergency Council. 1939—No. 2, transfer of U.S. Geographic Board. 1933—E.O. 6166, abolished C.S. Information Agency. 1953—No. 8, establishment of U.S. Maritime Commission. 1939_No. 4, transfer of functions to. 1949-No. 6,

to strengthen the powers of the chairman and improve administration. 1950

No. 21, transferring functions of, and abolishing U.S. Shipping Board. 1933——E.O. 6166, abolishing Urban Affairs. 1962—No. 1, establishing Department of Urban Affairs and

Housing Veterans' Administration. 1932—E.O. 5967, transfer of functions of. 1933—E.O.

6166, transfer of functions of. 1946-No. 3, transfer of functions to Veterans' Reemployment, Bureau of. 1950—No. 6, position of, in Department

of Labor Virgin Islands. 1950 No. 15, transferring certain public works functions in Vital Statistics. 1946-No. 2, transferring function of Vocational Education, Federal Board for. 1933—E.O. 6166, Transfer of, and

some functions abolished Votational Rehabilitation, Office of. 1946—No. 2, transfer of functions to Wage and Hour Division. 1947—No. 2, transferring to Department of Labor.

1950_No. 6, position of, in Department of Labor War Assets Administration. 1947-No.1, establishment of

War Claims Commission. 1954-No. 1, transferring functions of, and abolishing War Department. 1933—E.0. 6166, transfer of functions of. 1946—No. 3, trans

fer of functions to War Finance Corporation. 1939—No, 2, transfer of functions of War Mobilization, Office of. 1946—No. 1, transfer of functions to Water pollution. 1950—No. 16, transfer of control over Weather Bureau. 1932—E.O. 5960, transfer of. 1939— No. 4, transferred to

Department of Commerce. 1950—No. 5, position of, in Department of Com

merce Welfare, Department of. 1949—No. 1, proposal to establish Women's Bureau. 1950—No. 6, position of, in Department of Labor

OF MICHIGAN

SEP 9 1964

88th Congress

2d Session

}

COMMITTEE PRINT

MAIN
READING ROOM

IMPACT OF FEDERAL URBAN DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMS ON LOCAL GOVERNMENT

ORGANIZATION AND PLANNING

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Printed for the use of the Committee on Government Operations

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

32-583

WASHINGTON : 1964

PURCHASED THROUGH

DOC. EX. PROJECT

SENATE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS
JOHN L. McCLELLAN, Arkansas, Chairman

HENRY M. JACKSON, Washington KARI, E. MUNDT, South Dakota
SAM J. ERWIN, JR., North Carolina CARL T. CURTIS, Nebraska
HUBERT H. HUMPHREY, Minnesota JACOB K. JAVITS, New York
ERNEST GRUENING, Alaska JACK MILLER, Iowa
EDMUND S. MUSKIE, Maine JAMES B. PEARSON, Kansas

CLAIBORNE PELL, Rhode Island
THOMAS J. McINTYRE, New Hampshire
ABRAHAM RIBICOFF, Connecticut
DANIEL B. BREWSTER, Maryland
WALTER L. REYNolds, Chief Clerk and Staff Director
ARTHUR A. SHARP, Staff Editor

-
SUBCOMMITTEE ON INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS

EDMUND S. MUSKIE, Maine, Chairman

SAM J. ERWIN, JR., North Carolina KARL E. MUNDT, South Dakota
HUBERT H. HUMPHREY, Minnesota JACK MILLER, Iowa
THOMAS J. McINTYRE, New Hampshire JAMES B. PEARSON, Kansas
ABRAHAM RIBICOFF, Connecticut
DANIEL B. BREWSTER, Maryland
DAvid B. WALKER, Staff Director
WILLIAM L. DICKEY, Minority Counsel
MARK H. FREEMAN, Professional Staff Member
LURLENE P. WILBERT, Chief Clerk
DEE CRAVEN, Assistant Chief Clerk

il

FOREWORD

The Federal Government is now administering over 40 separate proams of financial aid for urban development, involving some 13 epartments and agencies. Increasing national awareness of urbanization’s accelerated pace during the past decade and a half is reflected in the fact that more than half of these grants-in-aid, loans, insurance, shared revenue, and direct operation programs were enacted subsequent to 1950. The impact of these Federal programs on our local governments has #. considerable discussion and some controversy at all levels. ittle systematic study and attention, however, has been directed to two significant intergovernmental aspects of these programs. First, to what extent do these urban financial aids promote the creation of special districts or otherwise affect the structure of local government? And second, to what extent do they employ performance standards requiring coordination of federally aided projects with local comprehensive development plans and decisionmaking? This information gap has now been filled by a report approved by the Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, in January 1964, o “Impact of Federal Urban Development Programs on Local Government §o. and Planning.” To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to provide a systematic survey of requirements for local government organization and planning in all Federal aid programs affecting physical development in urban areas and to assess the extent and nature of interagency coordination of these programs within the Federal Government. The report makes a number of recommendations to both the Federal and State Governments for legislative and administrative action to improve local organization, local lanning, and Federal interagency, coordination. An appendix #. and evaluates each program in detail and identifies pertinent regulations and official documents to serve as sources of information for further studies. This study complements other reports recently issued by the subcommittee. Our survey, “The Federal System as Seen by State and Local Officials: Result of the Questionnaire Dealing with Intergovernmental Relations,” revealed that more than half of the county officials and city managers, and almost half of the mayors, believe that Federal grant-in-aid statutory and administrative requirements hamper the flexibility in the organization of local government. This Advisory Commission report also supplements a “National Survey of Metropolitan Planning,” prepared |. the U.S. Housing and Home Finance Agency for our subcommittee, which provides a complete tabulation and analysis of the organization and functions of all metropolitan and regional planning agencies with jurisdiction in standard metropolitan statistical areas.

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