This Kindred People: Canadian-American Relations and the Anglo-Saxon Idea, 1895-1903

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, 2004 - 254 páginas
Kohn shows how Americans and Canadians often referred to each other as members of the same "family," sharing the same "blood," and drew upon the common lexicon of Anglo-Saxon rhetoric to undermine old rivalries and underscore shared interests. Though the predominance of Anglo-Saxonism proved short-lived, it left a legacy of Canadian-American goodwill as both nations accepted their shared destiny on the continent. Kohn argues that this new Canadian-American understanding fostered the Anglo-American "special relationship" that shaped the twentieth century.

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Contenido

The Venezuela Crisis Canada and American Hemispherism The North American Context of the Rapprochement and the AngloSaxon Response
13
John Charlton and the Limits of AngloSaxonism The Failure of Reciprocity and the AngloAmerican Joint High Commission
52
White Mans Burden EnglishCanadian AngloSaxonism and the SpanishAmerican War
92
The Crest and Decline of North American AngloSaxonism The South African War the Alaska Modus Vivendi and the Abrogation of the ClaytonBul...
135
The Defeat and Triumph of North American AngloSaxonism The Alaska Boundary Tribunal
167
The Obsolescence of North American AngloSaxonism
196
Notes
207
Bibliography
229
Index
247
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Acerca del autor (2004)

Edward P. Kohn is assistant professor of history at Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey.

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