The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2011 M02 7 - 352 páginas

"A great American tale told with a deft historical eye, painstaking analysis, and a supple clarity of writing.”—Jean Baker

“My husband considered you a dear friend,” Mary Todd Lincoln wrote to Frederick Douglass in the weeks after Lincoln’s assassination. The frontier lawyer and the former slave, the cautious politician and the fiery reformer, the President and the most famous black man in America—their lives traced different paths that finally met in the bloody landscape of secession, Civil War, and emancipation. Opponents at first, they gradually became allies, each influenced by and attracted to the other. Their three meetings in the White House signaled a profound shift in the direction of the Civil War, and in the fate of the United States. James Oakes has written a masterful narrative history, bringing two iconic figures to life and shedding new light on the central issues of slavery, race, and equality in Civil War America.

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - ScoutJ - LibraryThing

Actually quite good, if a bit repetitive and in some place contradictory. Oakes clearly lays out Lincoln's longstanding opposition to slavery, as opposed to his abolition-by-convenience reputation ... Leer comentario completo

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - HistReader - LibraryThing

Mr Oakes concludes this book with denial of writing a "dual biography." Despite this claim, the insight he provides with investigation of each man's words, Mr Oakes paints two near biographical ... Leer comentario completo

Contenido

I Have Always Hated Slavery
39
I Cannot Support Lincoln
87
0
105
4
133
5
173
6
209
7
247
For Further Reading
289
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Acerca del autor (2011)

James Oakes is one of our foremost Civil War historians and a two-time winner of the Lincoln Prize for his works on the politics of abolition. He teaches at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

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