Changing Paths: International Development and the New Politics of Inclusion

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Peter P. Houtzager, Michael Moore
University of Michigan Press, 2009 M12 14 - 312 páginas
After two decades of marketizing, an array of national and international actors have become concerned with growing global inequality, the failure to reduce the numbers of very poor people in the world, and a perceived global backlash against international economic institutions. This new concern with poverty reduction and the political participation of excluded groups has set the stage for a new politics of inclusion within nations and in the international arena. The essays in this volume explore what forms the new politics of inclusion can take in low- and middle-income countries. The contributors favor a polity-centered approach that focuses on the political capacities of social and state actors to negotiate large-scale collective solutions and that highlights various possible strategies to lift large numbers of people out of poverty and political subordination.
The contributors suggest there is little basis for the radical polycentrism that colors so much contemporary development thought. They focus on how the political capabilities of different societal and state actors develop over time and how their development is influenced by state action and a variety of institutional and other factors. The final chapter draws insightful conclusions about the political limitations and opportunities presented by current international discourse on poverty.
Peter P. Houtzager is a Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex. He has been a visiting scholar at the Center for Latin American Studies, University of California, Berkeley, visiting lecturer at Stanford University, and lecturer at St. Mary's College. A political scientist with broad training in comparative politics and historical-institutional analysis, he has written extensively on the institutional roots of collective action.
Mick Moore is a Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, as well as Director of the Centre for the Future State. He has been a visiting professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His professional interests include political and institutional aspects of poverty reduction and of economic policy and performance, the politics and administration of development, and good government.
 

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Contenido

z Political Capabilities over the Long
32
Beyond the Political Impossibility
58
Coalition Building from Below
88
Grounds for Alliance?
119
The Boundaries of Antipoverty Policy
139
Polity Qualities
167
The Sample Countries and Values of the Dependent
192
POVERTY REDUCTION AND REGIME
204
Development Expenditure per Capita at the State Level 109
209
A Typology of Indian State Regimes 115
215
Proportion of Developmental Expenditure
222
Does Decentralization Contribute to Poverty Reduction?
233
Arguing the Politics of Inclusion
260
Chapter 9
280
Contributors 185
285
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Acerca del autor (2009)

Michael Francis Moore was born April 23, 1954 in Flint Michigan. After dropping out of the University of Michigan following his freshman year (where he wrote for the student newspaper The Michigan Times), Moore worked at the local Buick plant. At 22 he founded the alternative weekly magazine The Flint Voice, which soon changed its name to The Michigan Voice as it grew to cover the entire state. In 1986, when Moore became the editor of Mother Jones, a liberal political magazine, he moved to California and The Michigan Voice was shut down. Moore has been active in promoting his political views. Moore was a high-profile guest at both the 2004 Democratic National Convention and the 2004 Republican National Convention. He has directed and produced several documentaries such as Roger and Me, The Big One, Bowling for Columbine, Fahrenheit 9/11 and Capitalism: A Love Story. Between 1994 and 1995, he directed and hosted the BBC television series TV Nation, which followed the format of news magazine shows but covered topics they avoid. His other major series was The Awful Truth, which satirized actions by big corporations and politicians. In 1999 Moore won the Hugh M. Hefner First Amendment Award in Arts and Entertainment, for being the executive producer and host of The Awful Truth, where he was also described as "muckraker, author and documentary filmmaker".

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