Blacks in Colonial America

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McFarland, 1997 M01 1 - 293 páginas
During the American Revolution over 3,000 persons of African descent were promised freedom by the British if they would desert their American rebel masters and serve the loyalist cause. Those who responded to this promise found refuge in New York. In 1783, after Britain lost the war, they were evacuated to Nova Scotia, where for a decade they were treated as cheap labor by the white loyalists. In 1792 they were finally offered a new home in West Africa; over 1,200 responded and became the founders of Freetown in Sierra Leone. This is a history of Africans in colonial America, from the slaves who worked on the earliest plantations to the free blacks. It thoroughly discusses the circumstances of their arrival in the New World (blacks were treated far differently from white servants), and the living conditions of both slaves -- work, health care, food, housing, family life and other elements -- and free blacks.

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Blacks in colonial America

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This is a labor of love for Reiss, a retired internist who has written on Colonial medical history. First inspired by Colonial history in a college class he took in the 1940s, Reiss has turned that ... Leer comentario completo

Contenido

Preface
1
The Concept of Slavery
3
African Roots
17
The Slave Trade
23
The Slaves Life in Colonial America
47
Africans in New England
65
Africans in the Middle Atlantic Colonies
79
Africans in the South
97
Colonization
145
Opposition to Slavery in Colonial America
157
Miscegenation
181
Slave Rebellion and Black Codes
189
Blacks and Christianity
217
Blacks in War
229
Notes
257
Index
285

The Freedmen
123

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