Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]

COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS

THOMAS E. MORGAN, Pennsylvania, Chairman
CLEMENT J. ZABLOCKI, Wisconsin

E. ROSS ADAIR, Indiana
WAYNE L. HAYS, Ohio

WILLIAM S. MAILLIARD, California
L. H. FOUNTAIN, North Carolina

PETER H. B. FRELINGHUYSEN, New Jersey
DANTE B. FASCELL, Florida

WILLIAM S. BROOMFIELD, Michigan
LEONARD FARBSTEIN, New York

J. IRVING WHALLEY, Pennsylvania
CHARLES C. DIGGS, JR., Michigan

H. R. GROSS, Iowa
WILLIAM T. MURPHY, Illinois

E. Y. BERRY, South Dakota
CORNELIUS E. GALLAGHER, New Jersey EDWARD J. DERWINSKI, Illinois
ROBERT N. C. NIX, Pennsylvania

F. BRADFORD MORSE, Massachusetts
JOHN S. MONAGAN, Connecticut

VERNON W. THOMSON, Wisconsin
DONALD M. FRASER, Minnesota

JAMES G. FULTON, Pennsylvania
BENJAMIN S. ROSENTHAL, New York PAUL FINDLEY, Illinois
EDWARD R. ROYBAL, California

JOHN BUCHANAN, Alabama
JOHN C. CULVER, Iowa

ROBERT TAFT, JR., Ohio
LEE H. HAMILTON, Indiana

SHERMAN P. LLOYD, Utah
JOHN V. TUNNEY, California

J. HERBERT BURKE, Florida
ABRAHAM KAZEN, JR., Texas

WILLIAM V. ROTH, JR., Delaware
LESTER L. WOLFF, New York
JONATHAN B. BINGHAM, New York
GUS YATRON, Pennsylvania

BOYD CRAWFORD, Staff Administrator
Roy J. BULLOCK, Senior Staff Consultant
ALBERT C. F. WESTPHAL, Staff Consultant
FRANKLIN J. SCHUPP, Staff Consultant
HARRY C. CROMER, Staff Consultant
PHILIP B. BILLINGS, Staff Consultant
MARIAN A. CZARNECKI, Staff Consultant
MELVIN O. BENSON, Staff Consultant
EVERETT E. BIERMAN, Staff Consultant
JOHN J. BRADY, Jr., Staf Consultant
JOHN H. SULLIVAN, Staff Consultant
JUNE NIGH, Senior Staff Assistant
HELEN C. MATTAS, Staff Assistant
HELEN L. HASHAGEN, Staff Assistant
LOUISE O'BRIEN, Staff Assistant
Dora B. McCRACKEN, Staff Assistant
JEAN E. SMITH, Staff Assistant
NANCY PEDEN, Staff Assistant
PAULA L. PEAK, Staff Assistant
DIANE GALLAGHER, Staff Assistant

SUBCOMMITTEE ON INTER-AMERICAN AFFAIRS

DANTE B. FASCELL, Florida, Chairman
JOHN S. MONAGAN, Connecticut

WILLIAM S. MAILLIARD, California
EDWARD R. ROYBAL, California

J. IRVING WIIALLEY, Pennsylvania
LEE H. HAMILTON, Indiana

H. R. GROSS, Iowa
ABRAHAM KAZEN, JR., Texas

F. BRADFORD MORSE, Massachusetts
BENJAMIN S. ROSENTHAL, New York JAMES G. FULTON, Pennsylvania
JOHN C. CULVER, Iowa

MARIAN A. CZARNECKI, Staff Consultant
HELEN L. HASHAGEN, Staff Assistant

(II)

[blocks in formation]

Page

3

42

WITNESSES

Wednesday, July 8, 1970—

Hurwitch, Robert A., Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-

American Affair

Palmatier, Howard H., Director, Cuban Refugee Program, Depart-

ment of Health, Education, and Welfare...

Thursday, July 9, 1970-

Hurwitch, Robert A., Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-

American Affairs.

Palmatier, Howard H., Director, Cuban Refugee Program, Depart-

ment of Health, Education, and Welfare...

Funseth, Robert L., Coordinator of Cuban Affairs, Department of

State

Friday, July 10, 1970-

Mather, Gen. George R., U.S. Army, Commander in Chief, U.S.

Southern Command..

Leber, Maj. Gen. Walter P., U.S. Army, Governor of the Canal

Zone...

Monday, July 13, 1970-

Nutter, Hon. G. Warren, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Inter-

national Security Affairs-

Holmes, Adm. E. P., U.S. Navy, Commander in Chief, Atlantic.

Lang, William E., Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Inter-

national Security Affairs.-

Monday, July 20, 1970

Hurwitch, Robert A., Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-

American Affairs

Palmatier, Howard H., Director, Cuban Refugee Program, Depart-

ment of Health, Education, and Welfare. --

Monday, July 27, 1970–

Reyes, Manolo, Latin news editor, television station WTVJ, Miami,

Fla...

Friday, July 31, 1970-

Aguirre, Dr. Horacio, editor, Diario las Americas, Miami, Fla.------

Monday, August 3, 1970-

Flood, Hon. Daniel J., a Representative in Congress from the State

of Pennsylvania---

STATEMENTS AND MEMORANDUMS SUBMITTED

FOR THE RECORD

Biographical sketches of Robert A. Hurwitch and Robert L. Funseth,

Department of State, and Howard H. Palmatier, Department of Health,

Education, and Welfare.

Memorandum of Understanding between the Embassy of Switzerland, at

Havana, representing the Government of the United States, and the

Government of Cuba, concerning the movement of Cubans to the

United States.--

Cuban refugee program: Three basic periods in flow of refugees; tabula-

tion.co
Cuban refugee airlift arrivals: Percent distribution by occupation and year

of arrival; tabulation --
Cuban refugee airlift arrivals: Percent distribution by age and year of

arrival; tabulation...

Joint resolution expressing the determination of the United States with

respect to the situation in Cuba, text of Public Law 87-733, approved

October 3, 1962 -

13

14

14

House resolution to express the sense of the House of Representatives

declaring the policy of the United States relative to the intervention of

the international communistic movement in the Western Hemisphere, Page
text of H. Res. 560, agreed to September 20, 1965.

33

Soviet Relations with Latin America, summary chart.

36

Letter dated July 7, 1970, from Representative Claude Pepper to Repre-

sentative Dante B. Fascell..

40

Status of lists and airlift (of Cuban refugees) as of July 5, 1970, tabulation.. 55

Airlift arrivals (of Cuban refugees) as of July 5, 1970, tabulation...

56

Biographical sketch of Gen. George R. Mather, U.S.Army, Commander

in Chief, U.S. Southern Command..

58

Prepared statement by USCINCSO (Gen. George R. Mather) for the

House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Inter-American Affairs

61

Biographical sketch of Maj. Gen. Walter P. Leber, U.S. Army, Governor

of the Canal Zone..

69

Map, Canal Zone, Panama-

83

Military Assistance Officer P ogram positions.

94

Biographical sketch of Hon. G. Warren Nutter, Assistant Secretary of

Defense (International Security Affairs) --

102

Biographical sketch of Adm. E. P. Holmes, U.S. Navy, Commander in

Chief, Atlantic

106

Map, the Caribbean.

128

Biographical sketch of William E. Lang, Deputy Assistant Secretary of

Defense for International Security Affairs..

134

Reimbursement to the United States for pay and allowances of U.S.

military advisers..

135

Department of Defense Comment on U.S. military personnel carried on

host country military rolls-

136

Letter dated March 7, 1969, from Hon. William B. Macomber, Jr.,

Assistant

Secretary of State for Congressional Relations, to Hon. Dante B. Fascell,

relative to Cuban refugees ..

140

Assistance to refugees in the United States-number of Cuban refugees

registered, number resettled, and total program costs, fiscal year 1961

through fiscal year 1970, tabulation.

159

Biographical sketch of Manolo Reyes, Latin news editor, televison station

WTVJ, Miami, Fla.

163

“Open letter to the Exile and Public opinion," letter smuggled out of

Cuban prison and received by Manolo Reyes in Miami..

172

Exhibits provided by Manolo Reyes relative to Soviet military and naval

buildup in Cuba.

175-178

Biographical sketch of Dr. Horacio Aguirre, editor, Diario las Americas,

Miami, Fla..

187

Memorial to the Congress, Committee for Continued U.S. Control of

the Panama Canal, 1970-

209

"Battle of the Levels--A Succession of Bugbears," additional statement

of Hon. Daniel J. Flood, August 3, 1970.-

224

Statement of Hon. Durward G. Hall, a Representative in Congress from

the State of Missouri.

230

APPENDIX

Text of protocol relating to the status of refugees between the United

of America and other governments (Jan. 31, 1967) and text of con-

vention relating to the status of refugees (July 28, 1951).

233

CUBA AND THE CARIBBEAN

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 1970

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS,
SUBCOMMITTEE ON INTER-AMERICAN AFFAIRS,

Washington, D.C. The Subcommittee on Inter-American Affairs met at 10 a.m. in room 2200, Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Dante B. Fascell (chairman of the subcommittee) presiding.

Mr. FASCELL. The subcommittee will please come to order.

We meet this morning to begin a series of hearings on Cuba and the Caribbean. The subcommittee has invited high officials of the Department of State, our key military and naval commanders responsible for our security posture in the Caribbean region, and officials of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, to discuss these subjects with us.

This morning, we are pleased to welcome Hon. Robert A. Hurwitch, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs; Mr. Robert L. Funseth, Coordinator of Cuban Affairs in the Department of State; Mr. Howard H. Palmatier, Director of Cuban Refugee Program in the Department of Health, Éducation, and Welfare; and Mr. Glynn W. Baker, Finance Management Officer, Cuban Refugee Pro

gram, HEW.

Today's and tomorrow's hearings will be held in open session. Beginning Friday morning, however, the subcommittee will go into executive session to receive the testimony of Gen. George Ř. Mather, Commander in Chief, U.S. Southern Command; Maj. Gen. Walter P. Leber, Governor, Panama Canal Zone; Adm. Ephraim P. Holmes, Commander in Chief, Atlantic; and Hon. G. Warren Nutter, Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs.

The subcommittee wants to cover all aspects of the U.S. policy toward Cuba; issues affecting our security posture in the Caribbean; as well as the broader question of Cuba's present and foreseeable status in the inter-American community.

We have many subjects to cover in these next 4 days. If necessary we will extend the hearings.

Nearly 8 years have passed since the crisis of 1962, when the basic issues of our national security and the prospect of a nuclear exchange with the Soviet Union hung in the balance as the late President John F. Kennedy moved to deal with the threat of offensive Soviet missiles being implanted on Cuban soil.

The whole civilized world was involved in that crisis. One misstep, one miscalculation, could have led to a disaster of global proportions. Today, 8 years later, that grim possibility is still with us. But in the

meantime, the framework in which a nuclear crisis could develop in the Caribbean has changed drastically.

The new presence of Soviet warships in the Caribbean, it seems to me, limits the U.S. capacity to deal with any security crisis in that area and instantly raises the stakes of a U.S. military response to a renewed threat of offensive missiles being stationed a few miles off our shores.

This concerns me greatly. I am raising this issue today because I want to find out from our policymakers in the Department of State, and from our military leaders, whether, given the presence of Soviet naval units in the Caribbean-or any other Soviet action—the United States would be able to deal effectively with the repetition of the 1962 crisis or with Cuban, or Soviet, military intervention in some other country of the Caribbean.

In short, do we still retain the flexibility which we once possessedor is the United States being checkmated in an area in which our vital national security interests are involved? Are our naval and military facilities in the vicinity of the Caribbean region—in Florida, in Key West, in Puerto Rico, at Guantanamo Bay, and in the Canal Zoneadequate to enable us to cope with any serious threat to our country?

We will pursue these questions during the next 4 days. But to begin, we will ask Assistant Secretary Hurwitch to outline for us the present U.S. policy toward Cuba—the factors which may cause it to change—and the prospects of any such development in the foreseeable future.

At this point in the record, without objection, I shall insert a brief biographical sketch of each of the witnesses testifying today.

(The biographical sketches follow:)

ROBERT A. HURWITCH

Robert A. Hurwitch, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs, was born in Worcester, Mass. and received his A.B. degree from the University of Chicago. Mr. Hurwitch joined the Foreign Service in 1950 after seven years in the U.S. Army. In 1956 he was assigned to Bogota as Labor Attaché and in 1960 he was transfered to Washington where he served as Deputy Director of the Office of Caribbean-Mexican Affairs and then Special Assistant for Cuban Affairs in the Bureau of Inter-American Affairs. In 1963 Mr. Hurwitch was selected to attend the Senior Seminar in Foreign Policy at the State Department's Foreign Service Institute; in the same year he received the Department's Distinguished Service Award. In 1964 Mr. Hurwitch became first secretary and served in Santiago, Chile and as Consul General and Counselor in La Paz, Bolivia for several years. In 1967 he was appointed Deputy Chief of Mission in Vientaine, Laos, which was his last post prior to his present post which includes responsibilities for Central America (including Panama), Mexico and the Caribbean area.

HOWARD H. PALMATIER Howard H. Palmatier was appointed Director, Cuban Refugee Program of the Social and Rehabilitation Service, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, by Secretary Finch in May 1969. Born in Maybrook, New York, Mr. Palmatier was educated in the United States and Europe. After wartime seryice in Africa and Italy he was assigned to refugee operations in Trieste. Sworn in as a career Foreign Service Officer in the Department of State in 1952 he was assigned to refugee operations in Germany, Italy, Turkey, Greece and other countries of the Middle East, becoming Director of Escapee Activities for all Middle East nations in 1959. In 1961 Mr. Palmatier was appointed Operations Officer of the Refugee and Migration Affairs Section of the U.S. Mission to the U.N. in Geneva. Reassigned to Washington in 1963 he was detailed to the Cuban Refugee Program, HEW. In 1966 he became a career employee of HEW

« AnteriorContinuar »