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FOUNDED IN 1786 BY JOHN HYACINTH DE MAGELLAN, OF LONDON

1912

THE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY

HELD AT PHILADELPHIA, FOR PROMOTING USEFUL KNOWLEDGE

ANNOUNCES THAT IN

DECEMBER, 1912

,

IT WILL AWARD ITS

MAGELLANIC GOLD MEDAL

TO THE AUTHOR OF THE BEST DISCOVERY, OR MOST USEFUI. INVENTION, RE

LATING TO NAVIGATION, ASTRONOMY, OR NATURAL PHILOSOPHY (MERE NATURAL HISTORY ONLY EXCEPTED) UNDER THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS : 1. The candidate shall, on or before November 1, 1912, deliver free of postage or other charges, his discovery, invention or improvement, addressed to the President of the American Philosophical Society, No. 104 South Fifth Street, Philadelphia, U. S. A., and shall distinguish his performance by some motto, device, or other signature. With his discovery, invention, or improvement, he shall also send a sealed letter containing the same motto, device, or other sig. nature, and subscribed with the real name and place of residence of the author.

2. Persons of any nation, sector denomination whatever, shall be admitted as candidates for this premium.

3. No discovery, invention or improvement shall be entitled to this premium which hath been already published, or for which the author hath been publicly rewarded elsewhere.

4. The candidate shall communicate his discovery, invention or improvement, either in the English, French, German, or Latin language.

5. A full account of the crowned subject shall be published by the Society, as soon as may be after the adjudication, either in a separate publication, or in the next succeeding volume of their Transactions, or in both.

6. The premium shall consist of an oval plate of solid standard gold of the value of ten guineas, suitably inscribed, with the seal of the Society annexed to the medal by a ribbon. All correspondence in relation hereto should be addressed TO THE SECRETARIES OF THE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY No. 104 SOUTH FIFTH STREET

PHILADELPHIA, U. S. A.

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66

In Vol. LI, No. 203, Dr. T. J. J. See's paper on the Depth of the

Milky Way : page 12, 8th line from top, for large read small ioth

decreasing read increasing.

large read small. page 13, 8th line from bottom, for enfeeblement of read en

feeblement to. page 14, 4th line from top, for million read thousand.

16 14th

In No. 204, the same author's paper on the Dynamical Theory of the

Globular Clusters. page 119, 18th line foom top, for “Stellar System” read “Stellar

System." page 122, equations (10), make denominator of first equation same as last two.

a
is

av page 127, 7th line from top, for

an

дп page 139, 1oth line from top, for convectedread " connected.”

read "

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page 144, last equation of (48) for "

read 2,"

page 165, 9th line from top, for "mediation

read “ meditation."

Members who have not as yet sent their photographs to the Society will confer a favor by so doing; cabinet size preferred.

It is requested that all correspondence be addressed

TO THE SECRETARIES OF THE

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY

104 South FIFTH STREET

PHILADELPHIA, U S. A.

PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY

HELD AT PHILADELPHIA
FOR PROMOTING USEFUL KNOWLEDGE

HELD AT PHILADELPHIA

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In formulating the laws of human thought, the logicians recognized what they called the fallacy of too few heads of classification. This might be called the fallacy of ignorance or of immaturity. It is characteristic of immature minds, the child mind and the beginnings of any science. To the child who has just learned the meaning of “papa” and “mamma," it often happens that all men are“ papas” and all women are “mammas," while the child born in certain localities believes that all men are either white or black. Similarly in the beginnings of science, we are limited through a lack of knowledge to a few heads of classification and our development comes by increasing our genera or species. Coming more closely to our particular problem, we find that for many years, mankind has been divided into those who are sane and those who are insane, the latter class including all those people whose behavior was so far from established norms that they could not get along comfortably in the world by themselves.

To-day the mental defectives or feeble-minded are alluded to in England as cases of congenital insanity. However, of late, we have begun to draw a rather sharp line between insanity and mental PROC. AMER, PHIL. SOC. LI. 205 1, PRINTED JULY 23, 1912.

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