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Ulrich's international periodicals directory. Ist;

ed., (1932,-
Nesi York, Bowker.

v. 20-20 ein.
Tille varirs: 1032-38. Terlodicals directory. - 1943-02. Ulrich's
fuerinlleuls directory.

l'ol for 1:H3 called Inter-American ed., with lille aime in Spain. ixh: 1917 calis l'ont war eil.. Invluding "A list of clandestine veri. obicnls or World War 11, by Adrienne Florence M117.zy."

Beginning with the 11th, encl million issued in 2 vols.
Founded and for 103:3-47 edited by C. F. Ulrich.

(Continued on next card)

32-16320 voorC7y87,

Ulrich's internntional periodicals directory. (Card 2)

- Supplement Ist-
1960-
New York, Bowker.
V. 28 cin, annunl.

20041.732

1. Periodicals-Direct. 2. World War, 1939-1017-Underground literatureBibl. 1. Ulrich, Carolyn Farquhar, 1881 od 11. Aluzzs. Adrienne Florence, 1896 A list of clandestine per indi. cals of World War II. 1. Title: Periodicals directory. 11. Title: Ulrich'n periodicals directory.

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FIGURE 2.-Catalog entry for a pseudoserial in the Library of Congress,

In volume 153 of the same catalog there are many examples under "U.S. Laws, statutes, etc." of laws on a particular subject which were issued and reissued constantly. Between 1919 and 1941, for instance, the pension laws were published and cataloged individually by the Library of Congress no fewer than thirteen times. In recent years, however, the Library has converted the records for many of these publications to serial form (see figure 3).

Note the gains to a library which follow from the serial handling of pseudoserials:

1. Serial follow-up methods are applicable once the title of a pseudo-serial is included in the current serial checking record.

U. S. Lurs, wintulcs, etc.

Law's relating to social security and unemployment com-
pensation. 1958
Washington, U. S. Govt. Print. 01.

r. 24 cm.
. Complier: 1038 0. G. Odell.

1. Old Age pensions, U. S. 2. Insurance, Unemploymeat-0. S. L Udell, Qilman O., comp. n. Title.

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FIGURE 3.—Library of Congress catalog entry for laws frequently issued and

reissued.

2. When desired, particularly in special libraries, a simple program for the discarding of superseded issues can be established. For United States government publications the regulations of the Superintendent of Documents permit the discarding of any publication after a revised edition of it has been received by a depository library.

3. The number of titles which must be cataloged each year is reduced desirably. At the same time the latest edition should be on the shelves sooner than when it must await individual cataloging.

4. Processing costs of various kinds are decrea sed, e.g., because there are fewer cards to make and file and because the shelf-listing function is simplified.

5. Readers and staff can more readily locate entries in the catalog, both because the mass of cards under a heading such as Burke or “U.S. Laws, statutes, etc..* is somewhat reduced and because the filing of the entries is not affected by the vagaries of wording in the titles of the successive editions.

6. In libraries which have closed stacks the latest edition, which is the one most commonly sought, can be called for in a simple way, just by writing the word "latest" in the space for volume or year. When the latest edition is shelved in the reference collection, the serial entry can bring this fact to the attention of the reader or staff member in a simpler and clearer way than can be achieved with a series of cards.

In 1969 the Library of Congress had 4,621 pseudoserials listed in its Serial Record Division. There were 1,310 on its visible index and 3,917 in its Old Serial Record, some items being listed in both catalogs. While the Library of Congress is still converting frequently issued publications into serials, it is not including law materials because the K classification arranges these items by date, not by a common serial-type number; and less is being done with pseudoserials in the era of shared cataloging because of the feeling that other libraries prefer separate cards for all editions. Actually the Library has little in the way of established policy on pseudoserials; a decision is made on each title as it occurs.

Local custom and a readiness to take advantage of favorable circumstances are more important than theoretical considerations in the determination of what shall be treated by serial methods in any given library. Hence serial practice may and does vary in some quite important respects from one institution to another. Obviously the desideratum in the treatment of serials, as in other library operations, is a large measure of agreement in principle together with great latitude

in practice. Reflections such as these are what make a liberal, working definition of a serial of greater value than a series of definitions each of which has loopholes.

BIBLIOGRAPHY Davinson, D. E. The Periodicals Collection; Its Purpose and lses in Libraries.

London : Deutsch, 1969, p. 33 37. Grenfell, David. "What is a Periodical?-or Serial?" in his Periodioals and

Serials; Their Treatment in Special Libraries, p. 183–88, 2d ed. London: Aslib,

1965. Kronick, David A. "Definitions of the Periodical," in his A History of Soientific

and Technical Periodicals; the Origins and Development of the Scientific and Technological Press, 1665-1790, p. 28-38, Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow, 1962.

MARCH 18, 1975. To: Working Group ('onference on Resolution of Copyright Issues. From: Publisher (Component of Working Group. Subject: Flow Diagram Describing Points of Data Collection for Reporting

Photocopy for Payment of Copyright Fees. In accordance with the request of March 4, the attached four sheets describe in greater depth the proposed use of an extra first page for each article copied as the means for data collection for royalty payments.

Page 1 of the attached identifies all participants in the most complex interlibrary loan systems now operating (e.g., VYSILL).

Page 2 identifies those data elements now utilized in a standard photocopy request and shows the additional data element required to implement the proposed collection method. Page 2 also identifies those participating organizations which might make further use of the data elements listed in contrast to those organizations requiring use of the data elements shown.

Page 3 identifies points in the flow where data is now collected to fill out the interlibrary loan request form and the single point additionally required to enter data on the first page of the article copy.

Page 4 is a copy of the standard interlibrary loan request form used to initiate interlibrary photocopy requests and identifies the data elements listed on Page 2.

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when more than one printed data pattern appears on the same pego,

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Note: Data Element 8 is not included above (e.g. ISSN or Coden).

SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION,

New York, N.Y., March 27, 1975. To: Working Group Conference on Resolution of Copyright Issues. From : Committee to Compare Variable Pricing and Transaction or Usage

Charges.
The Committee (J. K. Burgess, R. L. Kenyon, S. A. McCarthy and F. E.
McKenna) met on Mar 24, 1975 at the American Chemical Society, Washing-
ton, D.C. (10:00a.m. 4:00 p.m.).

This report is presented in 4 major sections :
A. Definitions
B. Caveat re Information Available
C. Variable Pricing

Advantages

Disadvantages
D. Transaction or Usage Charges

Advantages

Disadvantages A. Definitions:

1. Variable Pricing. This should refer to any system under which separate prices may be established by the publisher for each serial' os periodical for various classes of customer. The price set for a particular class of customer could be based on the subscriber's status or could relate to the usage of the material, such as for a library not carrying out photocopying activities, a library doing modest photocopying or a library doing a large amount of photocopying.

2. Transaction or Usage Charges.--This should refer to any method by which royalties or payments are directly related to individual instances of photocopying or duplicating material by any means. Such royalties or payments will be according to a specified charge per unit. (These royalties or payments may vary from publication to publication and would be established by the publisher: the royalty charges established for the copying of a particular item or unit would be the same for all libraries.) The transaction or usage charges are independent of any subscription price charged by a publisher.

1 The definition of "serial" is being considered by another Committee and the WG has not yet reached a consensus on the types of Rerials to be covered. This footnote applies to each use of the word. "serial." in this document.

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