Letters from England, Volumen2

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David Longworth, 1808
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Página 195 - And a great portent appeared in heaven, a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars; 2 she was with child and she cried out in her pangs of birth, in anguish for delivery.
Página 40 - We have no longer faith in miracles and relics, and therefore with the same fury run after recipes and physicians. The same money which three hundred years ago was given for the health of the soul is now given for the health of the body, and by the same sort of people — women and half-witted men. In the countries where they have shrines and images, quacks are despised, and monks and confessors find their account in managing the fear and hope which rule the actions of the multitude.
Página 64 - If ye abide in me, the works that I do shall ye do also, and greater works than these shall ye do, because I go unto my Father.
Página 135 - As may express them best ; though what if earth Be but the shadow of heaven, and things therein Each to other like, more than on earth is thought...
Página 43 - Is there no balm in Gilead ; is there no physician there ? why then is not the health of the daughter of my people recovered...
Página 152 - A sower went out to sow his seed ; and as he sowed, some fell by the way-side, and it was trodden down, and the fowls of the air devoured it. And some fell upon a rock, and as soon as it was sprung up it withered away, because it lacked moisture. And some fell among thorns, and the thorns sprung up with it, and choked it.
Página 78 - Having now had my horse for some time, and riding a great deal every week, I soon wore my breeches out, as they were not fit to ride in. I hope the reader will excuse my mentioning the word breeches, which I should have avoided, had not this passage of scripture obtruded into my mind, just as I had resolved in my own thoughts not to mention this kind providence of God. " And thou shalt make them linen breeches to cover their nakedness ; from the loins even unto the thighs shall they reach.
Página 152 - England has been called the hell of horses, the purgatory of servants, and the paradise of women: it may be added that it is the heaven of the Jews—alas, they have no other heaven to expect!
Página 151 - ... whiten the brass again, and again send it abroad. You meet Jew pedlars every where, travelling with boxes of haberdashery at their backs, cuckoo clocks, sealing wax, quills, weather glasses, green spectacles, clumsy figures in plaister of Paris, which you see over the chimney of an alehouse parlour in the country, or miserable prints of the king and queen, the four seasons, the cardinal virtues, the last naval victory, the prodigal son, and such like subjects, even the Nativity and the Crucifixion;...
Página 36 - I am an Englishman, and naked I stand here, Musing in my mynde what rayment I shall were, For now I will ware this, and now I will were that, Now I will were I cannot tell what,

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