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ants, and proportion of contribution in 1783, 82. Chrased, 390, 391. Views on the term of itizen
Desires to contiue. Virginia within the Alleghány, slip for members of Congress, 400, 412. Object:
93. Appoints delegates to the convention at An- to Congress altering the state regulations relative

Tapolis, 115. Refuses to send delegates to the to the election of members of Congress, 401,
Federal Convention, 118. Letter from, to the Objects to Congress fixing the qualitications of
Convention, 125. Proportion of representation its own members, 404. Wishes a specific enu-
in the House of Representatives before a census, meration of the powers of Congress, 139, 317.
129, 288, 290, 293, 316, 559. Proportion of repre- Objects to the exclusive power of the representa-
sentation in the Senate before a census, 129. tives over money bills, 419. His views relative
Proportion of electors of President, 287, 288. to the provisions about slaves, 457. Approves of

Opinions there on Federal Constitution, 567. the prohibition on Congress to pass attainders
RICE, 89.

and ex post facto laws, 463. Opposes a negative

in Congress on the state laws, 468. Objects to a
ROADS, establishment of post and military, by

removal of the judges on application of the
Congresy, 130, 434, 560. Regulation of stages on

legislature, 481. Objects to any suspension of
them, 440, 441. Plans in regard to, 446.

the writ of ha eas corpus, 484. Proposes to
RUSH, JACOB, 11.

prohibit the stales from passing attainders or
RUSSIA renews her mediation for general peace, 1.

retrospective laws, 485. Opposes a provision

requiring two thirds to pass a navigation act, 491.
RUTLEDGE, JOHN, represents South Carolina in

Opposes any national judiciary that is not merely
Congress, l. Voted for as President, 1. Remarks

appellate, 158. Objects to the judges formning a
on Court of Appeals, under the Confederation, 2. part of a council of revision, 349. Proposes the
Proposes to give to military commanders authori-

assumption of the state debts, 440, 441. Thinks
ty to retaliate for violations of laws of war, 3. controversies between the states should be left to
Urges more precision in the orders of Congress to

the judiciary, 471. Objects to a division of the
the executive departments, 4. Views on a valu-

territory of a state without ils consent, 494.
ation of lands as basis of taxation, 5, 40, 45. Thinks two thirds of the Senate should be re-
Proposes conditional exchange of Cornwallis for

quired to make a treaty, 527. Requires that a
Colonel H. Laurens, 7. Urges adjustment of a motion be made that amendments of the Consti.
plan of revenue, 13. Opposes salvage for recap- tution shall not affect the stipulation in regard to
tures on land, 18. Proposes to exempt American slaves, 532. Prefers to submit the Constitution
coinmissioners from control of France, 18. to the Congress of the Confederation, but not to
Wishes to adhere to rule of proportioning taxa-
tion, as fixed by the Confederation, 21, 25.

require their assent to it, 534. Signs the Consti-

tution, 565.
Appointed to confer with superintendent of
finance on arrears of army, 24. Proposes that
the negotiations in regard to confiscations and

S.
British debts should be made public, 26. Objects
to a general land tax by Congress, 34, 37. Views
on general system of revenue, 40. Proposes that ST. CLAIR, 93.
states shall be credited with duties they collect, SALARY. See COMPENSATION ; Par. Proposa
4). Remarks on export of tobacco by authority to reduce that of ministers plenipotentiary, 5
of Congress, 48. Proposes valuation of land be of secretary of foreign affairs inadequate, 9, 89,
made by Commissioners appointed by states, 48. 90. Reduction of, 99.
Proposes military force to retake goods seized SALT, tax on, proposed, 39, 40, 61, 67.
while under passport, 50. Proposes to appropri-
ate impost to pay army first, 51, 52. Proposes a

SALT FISH, drawback on, 84.
tariff of specific duties, 51. Dissatisfied with SCHUYLER, GENERAL, spoken of as secretary
report of superintendent of finance, 67. Remarks

of foreign affairs, 16, 91. Proposes Convention
on conduct of commissioners at Paris, 68, 75. to revise Confederation, 117.
Opposes including expenses received by states in
provision for public debt, 78. Remarks on pro-

SCIENCE, power of Congress to promote, 440, 511,

561.
portion of freemen to slaves in fixing contribu-
tions of states, 79. Advocates suspension of

SCOTLAND, effect of union with England, 179,
hostilities, 79. Remarks on completing cessions

269.
of public lands, 87. Delegate to Federal Conven-

SEA, felony at, under jurisdiction of judiciary, 128.
tion, from South Carolina, 106. Attends the Felony at, to be legislated upon by Congress,
Federal Convention, 123. Seconds proposal of 130, 378, 436, 543, 561.
Gen. Washington as President, 123. Opposes

SEAT OF CONGRESS, discussions in regard to,
an adjournment of the Convention without
adopting some plan, 318. Prefers a single execu-

112, 130, 373, 374, 409, 511, 561.
tive, 140, 149. Thinks power of war and peace

SECRECY, of the proceedings of the Convention,
should not be given to the President, 140. Pro 125, 126, 368. Of the proceedings of Congress
poses an election of the President by the Senate, 22, 130, 216, 378, 408, 561. Of the proceedings
144. Opposed to the President appointing the

relative to treaties, 523.
judges, 155. Prefers the election of the President SECRETARY OF THE FEDERAL CONVEN.
by the national legislature, 338, 512. Wishes a TION, William Jackson elected, 124.
property qualification for the executive, judiciary, SECRETARY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS, Mr
and legislature, 403. Proposes that the ballet in
Congress for the President be joint, 472. Pro-

Livingston, intends to resign, 9. Nominations
poses a representation of states in the Senate
according to their importance, 174. Proposes SECRETARY.

See Heads OF DEPARTMENTS.
that senators shall have no pay, 187. Proposes SECURITY of liberty to be provided for by the
an election of the representatives by the state Constitution, 127, 558.
legisIntures, 160, 223. Wishes representation in
the House of Representatives to be proportioned to

SEIZURE, of goods under passports, 27, 50, 54.
contribution, 178, 161, 279. In favor of biennial

Of Spanish property, 99, 100.
elections of representatives, 183. Desires ineligi- SEMINARIES, power of Congress in regard to
bility of representatives to office, 233. Wishes 440.
representation to be according to property, as well | SENATE, to be (D sen by the first branch of the
as numbers, 279, 297. Proposes a periodical cen- legislature, 127, 129, 131, 137. To be chosen by
sus, 279. Opposes too large a number in the the state legislatures, 137, 163, 166, 189, 375, 377,
House of Representatives, 293. Wishes it to be 559. To be chosen by the people, 138, 167, 205.
provided distinctly that Congress shall meet To be appointed by the President, 167, 972. To
annually, 385.

Desires that the term of neces- be chosen from districts throughout the Union,
sary residence of a representative should be in- 138, 169, 205. To be apportioned by 'he represe

for, 91.

sentatives after a cenous, 131. Ought not to be and small states relative to representatio.., 270
chosen by the people, 137. To be nominated by Wishes daily prayers in the Convention, 254.
the state legislatures, 137, 139. Number of inen- Objects to any discrimination in the representa-
bers before a census, 129. Number of members, tion of the new and old states, 310, 492. Suggests
129, 138, 166, 181, 206, 356, 377. Number from the number of the executive to be fixed froin
each state, 138, 336, 376, 377, 559. States to be time to time by the legislature, 140. Views or.
represented in, according to their importance, the election of the President, 142, 322, 472, 508
174. Ought to represent the states in proportion 513, 516, 519. Wishes executive to be reëligible.
to their property, 260, 276. Equal representation 142. Proposes three years as the executive term,
of the states in it, 13), 166, 178, 181, 219, 200,

142. Advocates a removal of the President by
261, 274, 285, 310, 317, 376, 377, 398, 415, 416, the legislature, 142. Prefers a single executive, .
550.

Represents the states in their political 150. Opposes an ab-olute negative in the execu.
character, 415. Its aristocratic character, 422. tive, 152, 43). Wishes an executive council,
Ought to be much smaller than the House of 150, Thinks the President's power of appoint.
Representatives, 138. To be a restraint on ex- ment should be limited by law, 474. Opposes
cesses of democracy, 138. Representation of the an executive during good behavior, 325. Pro-
states in it to be proportional, 138, 190, 238. poses one senator from each state, 138, 178. Ad-
Vacancies to be supplied by the state executives, vocates the election of senators by the state
395, 559. Age of its members, 127, 129, 186, 189, legislatures, 166, 109. Wishes the consent of the
241, 375, 377, 559. Qualifications of its meinhers, Senate required in pardons by the executive, 480.
127, 129, 189, 241, 247, 370, 375, 377, 398, 402, Advocates an equal vote of the states in the
559. Compensation of its members, 127, 190, 246, Senate, 178, 181. Proposes five years as the
271, 375, 378, 580. Ineligibility of its members senatorial term, 186. Proposes six years as the
to office, 127, 130, 190, 247, 375, 378, 420, 503, senatorial term, 241. Wishes a rotation in the
505, 560, Reëlection of its members, 127. To Senate, 241. Wishes the judges appointed by
choose the President, 144, 507, 518, 509, 512, 513. the Senate, 328, 329. Views as to the Senate
To consist of persons of wealth and intuence, being joined in the treaty power, 523, 526, Ap.
166. Ought to be able to resist encroachments proves of the Vice-President being president of
of the executive, 186. Ite duration should be for the Senate, 522. Advocates election of repre-
life, or during good behavior, 203, 205. (APPEN- sentatives by the states, 135, 101. Advocates
dix, No.5, p. 585.) To have a property qualifica- representation in the House of Representatives
tion, 247, 272. Not to be ineligible to state in proportion to the number of inhabitants, 178,
offices, 247. Their liability to impeachment,

297. in favor of annual election of representa-
343. 'Their incapacity to be electors of President, tives, 183, 225. Prefers an election of representa.
343, 562.

Vote in it per capita, 356, 377, 397, tives by the state legislatures, 223. Preters a
559. To have such property qualification as payment of the representatives by the state legis-
Congress shall provide, 377, 402. Previous term latures, 227, 426. Objects to making the repre-
of citizenship required, 377, 398, 559. To be sentatives ineligible to state offices, 230. Prefers
separately convened by the President, 530, 563. making representatives ineligible to national
Term of senators, 127, 1:29, 170, 185, 190, 203, offices, 231, 423, 505. Objects to making the
215, 241, 375, 377, 559. Whether the yeas and number of representatives very large, 292. Thinks
nays shall be required there, 407. To consent to that the time of annual meeting of Congress
pardons by the President, 480. Cannot adjourn should be fixed, 384. His reasons for introducing
beyond a certain period, or to another place, slaves into the ratio of representation, 392, 393.
without the assent of the House of Representa- Objects to requiring the yeas and nays in Con-
tives, 130, 378, 560. May require the opinion of gress, 407. Thinks the publication of the Journal
the judges, 445. Vote in balbuting for the Presi. should be left to the discretion of Congress, 408.
deni, 472. To be divided into classes, 129, 241, Thinks there is full liberty to make a discrimi-
245, 270, 375, 377, 398, 559. To choose its offi- nation between natives and foreigners as mem-
cers, 129, 377, 401, 559. Majority a quorum, 130, bers of Congress, 412. Objects to reduce the
377. Its privileges, 130, 378, 445, 5 0. To keep ratio of representation, 530. Remarks on the
and publish a Journal, 130, 378, 407, 408, 560. negative of Congress on state laws, 172, 468.
May originate arts, 127. Their power as to Views on the power of the general governinent
money bills, 129, 188, 375, 377, 394, 410, 415, 560. over the militia, 444, 480. Desires an absolute
To try impachin nls, 402, 507, 528, 529, 534, prohibition on the states in regard to paper
559. May repass acts returned by the President,

money, 485.

Views on prohibiting taxes on iin-
130, 378, 560. Its general legislative power, 130, ports or exports by the states, 486). Objects to a
205, 378, 379, 408. To declare war, 131, 438. public provision for delivering up fugitive slaves,
To make treaties, 131, 205, 245, 379, 428, 524, 487. Oljects to requiring more than a majority
526, 562. To appoint ambassadors, 131, 379, 467, to pass a navigation act, 489. Opposes exclusive
562. To appoint judges, 131, 156, 328, 379, 467, right of the House in regard to money bills, 189.
562. Joined with the President in appointments, Objects to fixing a rule of taxation before a cen-
131, 205, 328, 330, 349, 507, 5:23, 562. To decide 8118, 307. Thinks that in votes by ballot there
controversies between the states about territory should he a mutual negative in each House, 362.
or jurisdiction, 131, 379. Vice-President to pre- Wishes a tax on exports prohibited, 433. Ap-
side over it, 507, 522, 559. Their president to proves o Congress assuming the state debts, 441,
fill the vacancy in the Presidency, 131, 380, 473, 452. Proposes the appointinent of judges by the
507, 520, 5ti2. First election of, under the new legislature, 188. Opposes a national judiciary
Constitution, 381, 502.

that is not appellate, 159. Thinks there is a dis.
SEPARATION of the Union, 206.

tinction between treason against the United
SERGEANTS, mutinous conduct of, 91, 92, 93, 94

States and the individual states, 450. Objects

to the judiciary trying impeachments, 529. Ob-
SHAYS'S INSURRECTION, 94, 119, 126.

jects to interference of judges in legislation, 430.
SHELBURNE, LORD, sincerity doubted, 74. Objects to a general bankrupt law, 504. Desires
SHERMAN, ROGER, attends the Federal Con-

a provision in regard to armies during peace, 511.
vention. 132. Objects to the Constitution de

Thinks any positive prohibition of a religious
viating too much from the Confederation, 133,

test unnecessary, 498. Thinks that amendments
252. Wishes all the powers of government Irit

of the Constitution should be assented to by the

several states, 531. Prefers to submit the Con-
to the states, that are not absolutely needed for
the ends of the Union, 161. Disapproves of an

stitution to the Congress of the Confederation,
unnecessary interterence with

Views on
the Southern

but not to require their assent, 5:33.
Stales on the subject of slaves, 457, 461, 477.

the mode of ratifying the Constitution, 498, 499,
Prefers the legislative power remaining in a

500. Signs the Constitution, 564.
Congress, 218. Wishes a committee to suggest SHIPS OF WAR, not to be kept by states during
some plan of compromise between the large peace, 131, 331, 561.

SLAVERY, 391, 392, 457, 477.
SLAVES. See Negroes. Debates in regard to

their exclusion in fixing quota of taxes, 46, 48,
79, 81, 82. Those taken by British, to be deliv-
ered, 88, 91. Three fifths of, included in ratio of
representation, 181, 190, 192, 281, 288, 316, 375,
377, 379, 559. To be included in an apportion-

of representation according to numbers,
290, 301, 316, 391. Three fifths to be included in
ratio of direct taxation, 304, 305, 316, 375, 377,
391, 559.

Provision in regard to their emancipa.
tion, 357, 487. Power of Congress to tax or pro-
hibit their migration or importatiou, 379, 457, 471,
477, 532, 561. Compromise between the North-
ern and Southern States relative to, 460, 471,532.

Fugitive, to be delivered up, 487, 492, 563.
SMALL STATES contend for equal vote in Con-

gress, lu.
SMITH, MERIWETHER, appointed a delegate

to the convention at Annapolis, 113.
SMITH, THOMAS, represents Pennsylvania in

Congress, 1.
SOLDIERS. See ARMY; MILITARY.
SOUTH CAROLINA, her delegates in Congress,

November, 1782, 1. Interested in general reve-
nue, 60. Number of inhabitants, and proportion
of contribution, in 1783, 82. Votes for Mr. Bland
as President, 1. Adopts exclusive commercial
regulations, 119. Proceedings in regard to Federal
Convention, 106. Sends delegates to the Fed-
eral Convention, 123. Opinions there on Fed-
eral Constitution, 571. Proportion of representa-
tion in the House of Representatives before a
census, 129, 288, 290, 316, 559. Proportion of
representation in the Senate before a census, 129.
Proposal to increase its proportion of representa-
tion, 290. Proportion of electors of President,

338, 339, 562.
HOVEREIGNTY, Mr. Madison's remarks on that

of states and Union, 107. Jealousies of the
states about it, 127. How far it should be given
up, 176, 177, 193, 194, 197, 201, 205, 212, 220, 240,
218. The people attached to that of the states,
210. How far it is retained and yielded by the
states, 212, 220, 224, 248, 259, 269, 270. The
effect of the separation from Great Britain upon
it, 213, 217. of the states represented in the
Senate, 415. Of the states in cases of treason,

448.
BPAIGHT, RICHARD D., attends the Federal

Convention, 123. Proposes rules to regulate dis
cussions of Convention, 125. Urges the election
of the Senate by the state legislatures, 137. Pro-
poses seven years for the senatorial term, 186.
in favor of reconsidering the decision, to choose
the President by electors appointed by the state
legislatures, 357. Objects to requiring more than
a majority to piss a navigation act, 490. Suig-
gents seven years for the executive terni, 518.

Signs the Constitution, 565.
SPAIN, negotiations with her, 68, 71, 74, 76, 97.

Shows more favorable disposition, i. Amount
loaned by her, 8.2. Property of, seized, 99, 100.
Her views in regard to western territory and the

Mississippi, 97, 100, 101, 102, 105.
SPARTA, 197, 236, 252, 430.
SPEAKER, to be a member of the executive coun-

cil, 462. To fill the vacancy in the Presidency,
131, 380. To be elected by the representatives,

377. 559.
SPEECH, freedom of, 130, 378, 500.
SPRINGFIELD, 97.
STADTHOLDER, his intrigues to increase his

power, 151.
STAGES, regulation of, on post-roads, 440, 441.
STAMPS, duties to be laid by Congress, 191,
STANDARD of weights and measures may be

fixed by Cougress, 130, 378, 434, 500.
STATE, council of, 446. Secretary of, 446.

STATES, (UNDER THE CONFEDERATION,) a reve-

nue system can only be made by mutual accom
modation, 111. Will not pay their quotas of taxes.
112. Settlement with troops temporarily raised by,
6. Redeeming pap r money beyond their quota,
to be credited, 8, 14. Ohjections to addressing
them through the cominander-in-chief, 9. On
their making the valuation which was to be the
basis of taxation, 21, 24, 46, 47, 48. Their pro-
ceedings in regard to confiscations and British
debts, 26. Their rights not affected by Congress
raising a general revenue, 36, 55. Rule of voting,
45, 62, 88. Their inutual jealousies, 56. Plan
of Mr. Madison for fixing their proportion of
revenue, funding their debts, and establishing a
system of public lands, 59, 77. Amount of loan.
office debt of each state, 59. Their propriptions
of contributions according to whites and slaves,
79. Eastern and New York propose to hold a
convention, 8). Their number of inhabitants,
and proportion of contributions in 1783, 82.
Mode of adjusting their debts, 86. Claims of
certain states for abatements in their apportion-
mert, 58, 63, 77. Operation of treaties on them,
98. Settlement of their accounts, 99. Number
of, required in vote to suspend the use of the
Mississippi, 104. Their infractions of British
treaty, 119. Address of Congress on the neces-
sity of harmony and yielding local considerations,
111. Keep troops and make compacts without
consent of Congress, 119, 120. Violate contracts
by their internal administration, 120, 126. Jeal-
ousy between each other, 127, 220, 25h. Encroach
on Congress, 127, 172, 200, 217, 219, 248. Diffi-
culties in their adopting the Confederation, 111.
Differ as to suffiage in the Confederation, ill.
Differ in regard to public lands in the Confedera-
tion, 112. Violate treaties of the Confedera-
tion, 119, 126. Differ in regard to taxes on im-
ports in the Confederation, 112, 119. Their
conflicting commercial regulations during the
Confederation, 113, 119, 126. Five, send dele-
gates to the Convention at Annapolis, 114. All
except Rhode Island send delegates to the Fed.
eral Convention, 118. Proceedings in regard to
a Federal Convention, 96, 105, 124, 125, 134, 191.
Their sovereignty, how far affected by the Fed-
eral Constitution, 107. Their sufl'rage under the
Federal Constitution discussed, 107, 108. Their
proceedings in regard to the new Federal Con-

stitution, 570, 572, 573.
STATES, (UNDER THE CONSTITUTION,) proposal to

do them away, 182, 256. Their sovereignty, 176,
177, 193, 194, 212. Their efforts to increase their
own power, 200. Must be swallowed up by the
national government, 202. Not necessary for
any of the inain purposes of government, 202.
To be thrown into one mass and divided again,
194, 211. Ought not to be swallowed up by the
national government, 212, 217, 218, 220, 224.
Effect of the separation froin Great Britain upon
their sovereignty, 213. Effect of the union on
the large and small, comparatively, 214, 244, 251,
355, 268. Their situation will prevent combina-
tions of the large against the small, 25). To be
preserved by the Constitution, but rendered sub-
ordinate, 209. Alliance of the small ones with
foreign powers threatened, 268, 269. Plan of
compromise between the large and small ones,
on the question of representation, 260, 266, 270,
273, 274, 316, 317. The people of, establish the
Constitution, 376, 382, 536, 558. Not to be un.
necessarily encroached upon, 139, 170, 194, 320.
The powers of government ought to be left with
them as much as possible, 161, 164, 168, 170, 176,
193, 194, 217, 238, 210, 248, 320, 462. Their en.
croachment on the general government, 168, 200,
201, 208, 221. Ought to be permanent, 169.
Compromise between the Northern and South-
ern, relative to exports, navigation, and slaves,
460, 489. Their executives to correspond with
the President, 131, 380. Their legislatures to apo
point electors to choose the President, 324, 338,
35., 368. Their proportion of electors of Presi.
delit, 338, 339, 562. To be divided into districte

INDEX.

Wr.Nunst eleczors of President, 144, 205. Prefer 131, 381, 561. Not to enter into compacts with
* single executive, 128. Their executives to each other, 131, 381, 561. Not to make compacts
choose the President, 126, 363, 368. Their vote with foreign powers, 131, 381, 56). Not to emit
in Congress on a ballot for the President, 472, 520. bills of credit, 131, 381, 484, 561. Not to inake
Each to have one senator, 131, 166, 178, 181. any tender but gold, silver, or copper, 131, 381,
Their executives to supply vacancies in the Sen- 481, 561. Not to engage in war, except when
ate, 377, 395, 559. Represented in the Senate in invaded, 128, 381. Not to pass attainders or ret-
their political character, 415. To be divided into rospective laws, 485, 488, 561. Not to pass laws
districts, to elect senators, 138, 169, 205. Their impairing private contracts, 485, 56). Not to lay
governors to be appointed by the national govern- embargoes, 485. Conditions to be made with
ment, 205. Ineligibility of senators ought not to new ones on their admissjon, 381, 492. Admis-
extend to state offices, 247. The number of sena- sion of new ones, 128, 131, 157, 190, 192, 211, 279,
tors each is to have, 356, 377, 559. To nominate 288, 297, 298, 310, 376, 381, 492, 495, 504. Con-
senators to the House of Representatives, 127, vention to an end the Constitution to be called on
138, 139. To elect senators by their legislatures, their application, 381, 498, 564. Conventions ic
133, 103, 166, 240, 375, 377, 559. To be repre- be called in them to ratify the Constitution, 128,
sented in the Senate proportionally, 135, 166, 170, 157, 190, 352, 376, 381, 498.
238. To be divided into classes for electing sena-
tors, 166. To be represented in the Senate ac-

STATUE, one of Gen. Washington proposed, 88
cording to their importance, 174. To be repre-

STIRLING, LORD, death of, 31.
sented in the Senate equally, 131, 166, 178, 181, STOCK-JOBBING, 475.
219, 260, 261, 274, 285, 311, 317, 320, 375, 377, 396,

STRONG, CALEB, delegate to Federal Conven-
559. Their executives to fill vacancies in the
House of Representatives, 129. To regulate the

tion from Massachusetts, 106. Attends the Fed.
election of the representatives, 129, 377, 401,

eral Convention, 1:24. Prefers annual elections
559. To elect the House of Representatives, 135,

of representatives, 225. Thinks that the principle
137, 160, 177, 223. Number of their representa-

of representation should be the same in buth

branches, 273. Urges an adherence to the com-
tives, 129, 274, 279, 283, 290, 294, 316, 375, 377,
394, 559. 'Whether they ought to have an equal

promise between the large and small states, 313
vote in Congress, 134, 173, 175, 181, 190, 194, 195,

Objects to the judges forming a part of the coun-

cil of revision, 345. Prefers the election of Presi.
250, 260, 261, 267. To be represented according dent by the national legislature, 358.

Views as
to their property, 260, 275, 281. To be repre-
sented equally in Congress, 124, 135, 173, 175,

to the compensation of members of Congress,

4:27.
194. To have the same ratio of representation

Views as to money bills, 427.
iu both Houses, 181, 190, 238. To have their

STYLE, that of the government, 129, 132, 377, 382
representation in Congress limited in certain

That of the President, 131, 380.
cases, 452. Their legislatures to ratify the Con. SUFFRAGE. See VOTE; REPRESENTATION
stitution, 157, 352, 590. Number required to ratify SUGAR, proposed duty on, 62.
the Constitution, 158, 381. Congress to legislate

SUMPTUARY LAWS, 447, 539.
320, 375, 462. Their laws to be negatived by SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCE. See Fi.
Congress, in certain cases, 127, 139, 170, 190, 205, NANCE.
215, 248, 251, 418. Commerce among, to be regu-
lated by Congress, 130, 378, 4:33, 454, 478, 484,

SUPREME, objected to, as applicable to the de-

cisious of the government, 132.
489, 502, 560. Exports from, not to be taxed, 130,
312, 379, 432, 454, 561. Decision of controversies SUPREME COURT. See JUDICIARY; JUDGES.
between them about territory or jurisdiction, 131,

To be appointed by the national legislature, 128,
379, 471, 482. Their debts to be assumed by Con-

155, 188. To be appointed by the Senate, 131,
gress, 441, 451, 452, 471. Their assent required 190, 328, 379, 469. To be appointed by the Presi-
to requisitions by Congress, 192. Their votes on dent and Senate, 205, 328, 330, 349, 507, 524, 502.
money bills to be in proportion to contribution, Tenure, salary, and qualifications of the judges,
266, Force to be used against them in certain 128, 205, 376, 380, 481,563. Ought to be the only
cases, 128, 130, 139, 192, 200, 217. Their authori. national tribunal, 155. Its jurisdiction, 128, 131,
ties to take an oath to support the Constitution, 187, 190, 205, 376, 380, 482, 513. Has original
128, 182, 190, 351, 564. Voluntary junction of,

'urisdiction in cases of ambassadors, 131, 380,
157, 190.
Voluntary partition of, 182. To be

363. Has original jurisdiction in cases of im-
protected from foreign and domestic violence, peachment, 131, 380. Has appellate jurisdiction
130, 333, 378, 437, 446, 564. Regulations respect in admiralty cases, 131, 380, 563. To give its
ing their pulitic lands, or claims to territory, 441,

opinion in certain cases, 445.
49:1, 497. Their power over the militia, 443, 464, SUPREME LAW, acts of Congress and treaties,
551. Treason against them, individually, 448. 131, 192, 322, 375, 377, 467, 478, 564.
Jurisdition over cases between them, or their SUSPENSION, of hostilities proposed and refused,
citizens, 128, 131, 187, 380, 446, 462, 563. Their

Of laws by the executive for a limited
courts to adjudge all offences aguinst the Consti.

tine, 151. Of the writ of habcus corpus, 131, 445,
tution, 192. Their treaties with the Indians, 208.
Their treaties and compacts with each other,
without the assent of Congress, 208, 381, 547, SYSTEM OF GOVERNMENT. See Plan. How
582. Compacts or treaties between them, 132,

far it should deviate from the Confederation, 133,
206, 356, 381. Republican institutions and pro- 161, 176, 191, 193, 198, 214, 219, 248. Not ta en-
tection from violence to be guarantied, 124, 128, croach unnecessarily on the states, 139, 161, 176,
130, 132, 157, 182, 190, 216, 332, 5t4. Their citi- 238, 248. A strong national one advocated, 163,
zens to possess mutual privileges and inimunities 202, 256. It ought to preserve as much of the
in each state, 132, 32), 563. To deliver up to

state and national powers as may be compatible,
each other fugitives from justice, 132, 381, 553. 164, 168. Federal and national, compared, 132,
To give faith to the records and proceedings of 191, 198, 199, 200, 248, 256. National one adopt-
each other, 132, 381, 488, 504. Their courts

ed hy the Convention in preference to a federal
should be the only judiciary in the first resort, one, 212. General views that should govern the
1.59, 331. To appoint to national offices, 475.

Convention in forming one, 119, 126, 194, 198,
To deliver up fugitives from justice, 132, 381,

206, 233, 212, 248, 255. As adopted by the Con-
187, 563. To deliver up fugitive slaves, 487, 492, vention, after discussion, in a series of resolu
513. To assent to purchases by Congress within tion , 375. As draughted in the form of a Con.
their limits, 511, 561. Not to grant letters of stitution by a committee of detail, 377.
marque, 131, 381, 561. Not to confer nobility, SWEDEN, negotiations made public, 12.
131, 331, 561. Nyt to lay duties, 131, 381, 486,
561. Not to keep troops or ships of war in peace, SWISS CONFEDERACY, 201, 208, 236.

80, 84.

481, 561.

TREASURER may be appointed by Congress by
T.

ballot, 130, 378, 436, 542.

TREATY, commercial one with Dutch, 27, 38, 119.
TAXATION, mode of valuation as basis of it, 21. Commercial one with Sweden, 12. With Austria
Amount borne by United States, 32. Different proposed, 52.

Preliminary articles with Great
modes of, 38, 39, 55, 64, 77. Difficulties in regard Britain negotiated and signed, 65, 68, 73, 74, 105.
to, under the Confederation, 112. Proportion of Secret article relative to Florida and Spain, 65,
suffrage in the legislature to be regulated by, 127, 67, 68, 71, 72, 73, 74. Commercial, with Russia
130, 371, 377, 379. To be laid and collected by proposed, 84, 89. Provisional articles ratified by
Congress, 130, 378, 462, 500. Not to be laid on Congress, 8. Commercial, with the British, 88,
exports, 130, 379, 432, 454, 561. Capitation to be 101. With Spain, relative to boundaries and the
in proportion to number of inhabitants ascer- Mississippi, 98. Operation of, on the states under
tained by census, 130, 379, 391, 559. Direct, to the Confederation, 99, 119, 126. Infractions of
be in proportion to number of inhabitants a cer- British treaty, 119, 120, 126. Violations of, by
tained by census, 130, 316, 375, 379, 559. Direct, the states during the Confederation, 119, 127.
to be in proportion to representation, 302, 310, Infractions of that with France, 119. President
375, 379, 391, 559. Direct, to be in proportion to to have an agency in them, 469. To be made by
the free inhabitants and three fifths of the slaves,

the Senate, 131, 205, 245, 379, 428, 469. To te
304, 305, 316, 375, 377, 379, 559. Proportion of, made by the President, with the advice of the
before a census, 30 i, 307, 316, 451, 453, 559. On

Senate, 205, 507, 5:22, 562. Not to be made oy,
the migration or importation of slaves, 379, 457, the states, 131. To be the supreme law, 131,
471, 477, 561. Means of direct taxation, 451. 192, 322, 375, 379, 467, 478, 483, 564. "To be en-
Proposal to raise it by requisitions, 453. Com- forced by Congress, 130, 192, 379, 407. Ratifica
promise between the Northern and Southern tion of them, 409, 507, 524. The power of the
States as to that on exports, navigation, and Senate in regard to, 131, 205, 245, 379, 428, 469,
slaves, 460, 471. To be laid only to pay debts 508, 524, 526, 562. Laws of states contravening
and necessary expenses, 462, 469, 560. Capita- them to be negatived by Congress, 127, 190.
tion, 130, 379, 470. On navigation, 130, 379, 461, Plans of, to be prepared by the secretary of for-
470. To be uniform among the states, 478, 484, eign affairs, 446. Not to be published in the
489, 502, 543, 560.

Journal of the Senate, 408. How far they are to
TEMPLE, SIR W., 175.

be considered as laws, 382, 483. Between the

states without consent of Congress, 208, 381.
TEMPLE, MR., admission of, as British consul,

Between the states and the Indians, 208. Ke-
101.

tween the states not sufficient for a union, 132,
TENURE, of the judiciary, 128, 131, 156, 190, 205, 206. Effect of their violation on the rights of the

349, 376, 380, 563. Or the executive, 128, 142, parties, 207.
149, 190, 325, 327, 334, 338, 363, 365, 309, 375, 380, TRENTON, Congress adjourns to meet there, 94.

472, 507, 512, 502.
TENDER, yone to be authorized by the states but

TRIAL, to be in the state where the crime is com-

mitted, 131, 381, 484, 563. Of impeachments,
gold and silver, 131, 381, 484, 561. Bills of credit

462, 484, 507, 528, 529, 534, 559.
not to be made one, 434, 435, 561.

TROOPS not to be kept by states during peace,
TERM, of the executive, 128, 142, 149, 190, 205,

13), 381, 445, 548, 561,
325, 327, 3334, 338, 303, 365, 369, 375, 380, 472,507,
512, 56. of residence and citizenship of the TRUMBULL, JONATHAN, nominated as secre-
President, 162, 562. Of the Senate, 127, 129, 185, tary of foreign affairs, 91.
19), 205, 241, 375, 377, 559. Of the representa- | TUCKER, ST. GEORGE, appointed to convertion
tives, 127 129.183, 189, 205, 224, 375, 377, 558. at Annapolis, 113, 114.
or residence and citizenship for members of

TYLER, MR., proposes the appointment of dele-
Congress, 379, 389, 398, 411, 559. of the judi-

gates to the convention at Annapolis, 114.
ciary, 128, 131, 154, 190, 205, 369, 376, 380, 563.

Of census, 301, 375, 379, 559.
TERRITORY. See Lands, Public. Expense of
their government, 92. Discontent in regard to

U.
Spain and the Mississippi, 101, 107. That of
each state guarantied, 128, 157, 182, 190. De-

UNIFORMITY, of commercial regulations, the ob.
cision of controversies about, between the states, ject of the convention at Annapolis, 113, 114.
131, 379, 471, 493, 497. Regulation of, by Con- As to bankruptcy and naturalization needed dur.
gress, 439, 493, 564.

ing the Confederation, 120. of regulations rela.
TEST of religion not to be required, 446, 498, 564.

tive to trade between the states, 478, 464, 489,

502, 540, 545, 548, 552. of regulations relative
TITLE, of nobility, not to be given, 130, 131, 379,
381, 561. Of the President, 131, 380, 471. Not to

to bankruptcy, 488, 503, 504, 560.
be accepted, 467, 561,

UNION, a more lasting one than that of the Con-
TOBACCO, exported under passports from Con-

federation desired, ill, 116, 117. Commercial
gress, 43, 47.
Virginia opposes the right to grant

regulations necessary to preserve it, 113. Endan
them, 43, 47.

gered by conflicting regulations of the states, 113

Gloomy prospects of, in 1787, 119, 120. Division
TORIES, stipulations concerning, in provisional of, desired by some, 96, 120. Its dangerous situ.
articles, 88, 89.

ation in 1787, 127. Merely federal, not sufficient,
TRADE. See IMPOST; NAVIGATION. Reciprocal,

132. To be divided into senatorial districts, 138.
with Britain and West Indies, 19. Treaties in Objects of it, 16). How to be dissolved, 206. Its
regard to, ought to be carefully considered, 85. nature, 207. Necessity of it, 210, 255, 257, 258,
Convention at Annapolis to regulate it, 113. Be- 276. Proposed, by throwing the states into one
tween the states, under the Confederation, 115, mass, and dividing them anew, 194, 202, 211.
TIR, 119. Regulation of, by Congress, 130, 191,
378, 478, 560. Between the states, 478, 484, 4-9,

UNITED STATES, government to be so styled,
502, 539, 545, 546, 552. With the Indians, 439,

129, 377, 332, 559. To form a corporation, 446.

Treason against them, as distinguished from that
402, 507, 500.

against the individual states, 448.
TREASON, members of Congress may be arrested
for, 138, 378, 500. Definition and punishment

UNITY of the executive, 140, 149, 150, 165, 190.
of, 13), 379, 447, 563. President to be removed

192, 197, 322, 358, 375, 380, 471, 512.
for, 131, 380, 181, 528, 563. Pardon in cases of, UNIVERSITY, establishment of, by Congress.
535

130, 440, 544.

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