Southern Unionist Pamphlets and the Civil War

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Jon L. Wakelyn
University of Missouri Press, 1999 - 392 páginas
"During the Civil War, many southerners expressed serious opposition to secession and openly entreated their fellow southerners to maintain support for the Union. A number of these unionists actively opposed the Confederacy while remaining within its borders; others fled their homes and the South, becoming exiles in northern cities and the border slave states. The southern unionist leaders used their oral and written communication skills to proclaim their opposition to the Confederacy, often producing pamphlets that circulated in the North, in the border states, and in the heart of the Confederacy itself. Jon L. Wakelyn unites the voices of these southern unionists in the first comprehensive collection of their written arguments - Southern Unionist Pamphlets and the Civil War." "Students, scholars, and general readers alike will find this volume an invaluable resource for Civil War studies."--Jacket.

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ANNA ELLA CARROLL
16
ROBERT JEFFERSON BRECKINRIDGE
27
WAITMAN T WILLEY
56
JOHN S CARLILE
82
WILLIAM GANNAWAY BROWNLOW
105
JOHN W WOOD
120
bear most heavily upon the poorer classes producing a degree
147
CHARLES D DRAKE
148
ANDREW JOHNSON
255
FRANCIS HARRISON PIERPONT
273
JOSEPH E SEGAR
304
JEREMIAH CLEMENS
330
THOMAS J DURANT
341
onehalfthecitizens thus to trampleon therights oftheothertransforms
359
ANTHONY PAUL DOSTIE
360
THOMAS C FLETCHER
369

BRYAN TYSON
170
EDWARD W GANTT
203
MICHAEL HAHN
225
ANDREW JACKSON HAMILTON
238
Comments on Southern Unionist Pamphlets
373
Comments on Immediate Postwar
383
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Página 94 - If in the opinion of the people the distribution or modification of the constitutional powers be in any particular wrong, let it be corrected by an amendment in the way which the Constitution designates. But let there be no change by usurpation; for though this in one instance may be the instrument of good, it is the customary weapon by which free governments are destroyed. The precedent must always greatly overbalance in permanent evil any partial or transient benefit which the use can at any time...
Página 105 - Congress, banishing all feelings of mere passion or resentment, will recollect only its duty to the whole country; that this war is not waged upon our part in any spirit of oppression nor for any purpose of conquest or subjugation, nor purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of those States, but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution. and to preserve the Union with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired:...
Página 82 - ... the support of the State governments in all their rights, as the most competent administrations for our domestic concerns, and the surest bulwarks against anti-republican tendencies: the preservation of the general government in its whole constitutional vigor, as the sheet anchor of our peace at home, and safety abroad...
Página 67 - That the maintenance inviolate of the rights of the States, and especially the right of each State to order and control its own domestic institutions according to its own judgment exclusively...
Página 106 - That the present deplorable civil war has been forced upon the country by the disunionists of the southern States, now in revolt against the constitutional Government, and in arms around the capital ; that in this national emergency Congress, banishing all feelings of mere passion or resentment, will recollect only its duty to the whole country ; that this war is not waged on...
Página 190 - Thou shalt not deliver unto his master the servant which is escaped from his master unto thee: he shall dwell with thee, even among you, in that place which he shall choose in one of thy gates, where it liketh him best : thou shalt not oppress him.
Página 82 - ... the vital principle of republics from which there is no appeal but to force, the vital principle and immediate parent of despotism; a well-disciplined militia, our best reliance in peace and for the first moments of war till regulars may relieve them; the supremacy of the civil over the military authority; economy in the public...
Página 82 - ... a jealous care of the right of election by the people, — a mild and safe corrective of abuses which are lopped by the sword of revolution where peaceable remedies are unprovided...
Página 104 - I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so; and I have no inclination to do so.
Página 75 - The constitution requires an adoption in toto and forever. It has been so adopted by the other states. An adoption for a limited time would be as defective as an adoption of some of the articles only. In short, any condition whatever must vitiate the ratification. The idea of reserving a right to withdraw was started at Richmond, and considered as a conditional ratification, which was itself abandoned as worse than a rejection.

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