Discourse on the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the Birth of William Penn: Delivered in the Independence Hall at Philadelphia, on 24th October, 1844, Before the Historical Society of Pennsylvania

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J. Penington, 1845 - 40 páginas
 

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Página 33 - ... that all the instructors and teachers in the College shall take pains to instil into the minds of the scholars, the purest principles of morality, so that, on their entrance into active life, they may from inclination and habit, evince benevolence towards their fellow creatures, and a love of truth, sobriety, and industry, adopting at the same time such religious tenets as their matured reason may enable them to prefer.
Página 33 - ... that all the instructors and teachers in the college shall take pains to instil into the minds of the scholars the purest principles of morality, so that, on their entrance into active life, they may, from inclination and habit, evince benevolence towards their fellow-creatures, and a love of truth, sobriety, and industry, adopting at the same time such religious tenets as their matured reason may enable them to prefer.
Página 33 - I enjoin and require that no ecclesiastic, missionary, or minister of any sect whatsoever, shall ever hold or exercise any station or duty whatever in the said College; nor shall any such person ever by admitted for any purpose, or as a visitor, within the premises appropriated to the purposes of the said College.
Página 9 - ... we must give the liberty we ask, and cannot be false to our principles, though it were to relieve ourselves ; for we have goodwill to all men, and would have none suffer for a truly sober and conscientious dissent on any hand.
Página 24 - And thou, Philadelphia, the virgin settlement of this province, named before thou wert born, what love, what care, what service, and what travail, has there been to bring thee forth and preserve thee from such as would abuse and defile thee!
Página 32 - I would have them taught facts and things, rather than words or signs: And, especially, I desire, that by every proper means a pure attachment to our republican institutions and to the sacred rights of conscience, as guaranteed by our happy constitutions, shall be formed and fostered in the minds of the scholars.
Página 24 - My soul prays to God for thee, that thou mayest stand in the day of trial, that thy children may be blessed of the Lord, and thy people saved by his power.
Página 37 - Resolved, That the declaration, passed on the fourth, be fairly engrossed on parchment, with the title and style of 'THE UNANIMOUS DECLARATION OF THE THIRTEEN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; 1 and that the same, when engrossed, be signed by every member of congress.
Página 8 - ... to entitle every native to English privileges. It was this, and not his religion which gave him the great claim to the protection of the government under which he lived. Near three hundred years before Austin set his foot on English ground the inhabitants had a good constitution. This came not in with him. Neither did it come in with Luther ; nor was it to go out with Calvin. We were a free people by the creation of God, by the redemption of Christ, and by the careful provision of our...
Página 38 - I believe felt a little tender under those censures ; for tho' their people have very few slaves themselves, yet they had been pretty considerable carriers of them to others. The debates having taken up the greater parts of the 2d, 3d...

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