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The Child Labor Bulletin

VOLUME II

NOTE.—Words printed in capitals indicate titles of articles.

Italics indicate publications.
Roman numerals refer to the number of the Bulletin, Arabic num-

“Blind alley" occupations see Dead end occu-

pations
Boswell, M. Louise CHILD LABOR AND NEED

I. 17
Bremer, Harry M.

addresses III. 29
investigations III. 20
STRAWBERRY PICKERS OF MARYLAND IV.

70
Brown, Edward F.

addresses III. 29
CONDITIONS IN THE Child EMPLOYING

INDUSTRIES OF THE SOUTH: a symposium

I. 138
investigations III. 20
NEGLECTED HUMAN RESOURCES OF THE

GULF Coast STATES I. 13
BURDEN OF THE CHILDREN IN SHRIMP AND

OYSTER CANNERIES, THE: Lewis W.

Hine I. 105
Bureau of Labor see Federal Bureau of Labor

California
eight hour law

adults IV. 50

minorg IV. 48
legislation (1913) III. 13
CAMPAIGN IN NORTH CAROLINA. THE MOUN-

TAIN WHITES BY ONE OF THEM: Wiley

H. Swift I. 96
Campbell, Edith M. I. 17
Campbell, John C. FROM MOUNTAIN CABIN

TO COTTON MILL I. 74
Canneries

Alabama I. 114, 115, 116
Atlantic coast I. 105, 111
editorial III. 6
enforcement of child labor law

I. 107,
109, 113, 115; III, 6, 7
Florida I. 115, 116
Gulf coast I, 105, 111
investigated (1911) I. 112: III. 20
legislation (1913) III. 12-15
Louisiana 1. 112, 113, 116
Maryland I. 105
Mississippi I. 105, 112-114, 116
oyster and shrimp I. 105-111; III. 20
schools I. 109, 110
states exempting III, 7
wages

I. 109
Certificates for employment

Georgia II. 74
legislation (1913) III. 12-15

uniform law I. 168
Charts III. 44; IV. 11
Chicago

8345

erals to the page.
N. C. L. C. is abbreviation for National Child Labor Committee.

Addams, Jane I. 151
Adler, Felix I. 153, 154
Administration of child labor laws see Enforce-

ment
Affidavits see Evidence of age
Age limit of working children

Alabama I. 156
Georgia I. 157
legislation (1913) III. 12-15
legislation needed (1914) III. 34-43
South Carolina I. 86, 89

West Virginia I. 156
Agricultural work of children

berry picking in Maryland IV. 70-75
cotton picking in Texas IV. 66-69
cranberry bogs III. 20
etiects IV. 66, 67, 73, 74
photographs see Index of Photographs

school attendance IV. 73, 74
Alabama

Birmingham I. 162, 167
canneries I. 114, 115, 116
child labor law I. 117, 118, 125, 156;

III. 50; IV. 35, 36, 37, 64, 65
CONDITIONS IN THE CHILD EMPLOYING
INDUSTRIES OF THE SOUTH: Alabama:

Mrs. W. L. Murdoch I. 124
mines I. 127
night messengers

I. 140
street work I. 126, 127
textile mills I. 117, 125

investigated (1913) IV. 63, 64
ownership IV. 64

sanitation I. 118-120, 126
American Bar Association I. 63, 68
ANCIENT STANDARDS FOR CHILD PROTECTION:

Rabbi David Marx I. 42
Appropriations

Federal Children's Bureau IV. 5

legislation (1913) III. 12-15
Arizona

child labor law I. 160; IV. 36
eight hour law

adults IV. 49, 50

minors IV. 48
Arkansas

child labor campaign I. 157
child labor law III. 5; IV. 36

legislation (1913) III. 12
Associations, employers' I. 11, 12
Association for Iniproving the Condition of the

Poor

poverty and child labor I. 31, 32
Atlantic coast canneries I. 105, 111

birth registration I. 59

wages of girls I. 52
CHILD AGAINST THE MAN, THE: Dr. A. J.

McKelway III, 52
CHILD BREAD WINNER AND THE DEPENDENT
PARENT, THE:

Mrs. Florence Kelley
I. 1

Bailey, Mrs. E. L. CONDITIONS IN THE

Child EMPLOYING INDUSTRIES OF THE

South: a symposium I. 128
Baker, Judge W. H. I. 152
Beveridge, Senator I. 34
Berry fields see Agricultural work of children
Birmingham, Ala. I. 167

local newsboys' ordinance I. 162
Birth registration I. 58

Chicago I. 52
Florida I. 58, 59
legislation needed (1914) III. 34-43
South Carolina I. 86, 89

3

37

Cincinnati I. 16, 17
effects I. 34, 36, 37, 162; IV. 41, 42, 66

67, 73, 74
labor unions and I. 10, 53
legislation

coordination with school and health
laws I. 60, 64, 65, 89
1913 III. 12-17
needed (1914) III. 34-43, 46, 47

since 1904 III. 45, 46
occupations see Occupations of working

children
poverty and I. 27-31, 32
public opinion I. 61
scholarships I. 32, 33, 38, 88, 158, 159

170; IV. 61
standards I. 63
textile mills see Textile mills
unnecessary I. 169-172

wages I. 10, 33, 34, 55; III, 54, 55, 56
CHILD LABOR AND HEALTH: Dr. W. H. Oates

I. 117
CHILD LABOR AND Low WAGES: Jerome Jones

I. 52
CHILD LABOR AND NEED: M. Louise Boswell

I. 17
Child LABOR AND POVERTY: BOTH CAUSE AND

EFFECT: John A. Kingsbury I. 27
Child labor day

editorial III. 10

report (1913) III. 23
CHILD LABOR IN GEORGIA-A STORY FOR

GROWN-UPS: Dr. A. J. McKelway II.

51
CHILD LABOR IN THE COTTON Mills: Mrs.

John Van Vorst III. 53
CHILD LABOR LAWS FOR 1914: AN ADDRESS

TO THE CITIZENS OF TWELVE STATES

III. 33
Child Labor League, Warsen, Ohio I. 159
CHILD LABOR REFORM IN THE SOUTH, TEN
YEARS OF: Dr. A. J. McKelway

IV.
35
Children at work

Cincinnati survey I. 16, 17
illegally I. 41, 157, 164; II. 61-75; IV.

63
illiterate I. 11, 52
physical examination of I. 120; III.

12-15; IV. 77
wages see Wages

see also Occupation of working children
Children's Bureau see

Federal Children's
Bureau
Children's code I. 64
CHILD WAGES IN THE COTTON Mills: Dr.

A. J. McKelway I. 7
Cincinnati
survey of children at work

I. 16, 17
City ordinances

advisability I. 167

Birmingham I. 167
Clopper, Edward N. I. 17

THE MAJESTY OF THE LAW IN MISSISSIPPI

IV. 54
Collyer, Dr. Robert I. 27-30
Colorado
eight hour law

adults IV. 50
minors IV. 48

prisoners IV, 53
legislation (1913) III. 13
Commission

Industrial Welfare III. 12, 15, 16
minimum wage III. 13, 14, 16

Rockefeller Sanitary I. 78
Committee

Florida Child Labor I. 150, 157, 169
Massachusetts Child Labor III. 26
Mississippi Child Labor I. 30
New York Child Labor III. 20
Pennsylvania Child Labor III. 21

South Carolina I. 89
Compulsory school attendance I. 16, 60;

III. 33
child labor and I. 164, 172
England I. 161

Georgia I. 39
legislation needed (1914) III. 344-3
New York I. 5
South Carolina I. 15. 88, 89, 137; III.
Tennessee I. 144

see also School, attendance
Conant, Richard K. III. 21

THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY AND CHILD LABOR

I. 91
CONDITIONS IN THE CHILD EMPLOYING INDUS-

TRIES IN THE SOUTH: & symposium:
1. Mrs. W. L. Murdoch 1. 124
2. Mrs. A. E, Bailey I. 128
3. Judge J. A. McCullough I. 133

4. Edward F. Brown 1. 138
Conferences
X. C. L. C-

9th annual I. 145; 11. 22

10th annual IV. 6; IV. 15 18
N. C. L, C. represented at III. 31
Connecticut

eight hour law (adults) IV. 50

legislation (1913) III. 13, 17
Continuation schools
Massachusetts

III. 14
New York III. 13
Cotton census (1909)

children in the cotton industry I. 10

editorial III. 7
Cotton mills

conditions I. 8, 10
England I. 16
federal investigation of I. 8
Georgia I. 41; II. 64-72
North Carolina I. 7; III. 19, 20, 55
ownership of New England and southern

II. 57-60; IV. 64
photographs see Index of Photographs
South Carolina I. 83, 88. 134-137
tyranny of employers I. 12, 13, 14
Wages see Wages

see also Textile mills
Cotton picking,

photographs see Index of Photographs

Texas IV. 66-69
Cranberry bogs see Agricultural work of chil-

dren
Crosby, Fanny J. HYMN FOR THE Working

CHILDREN II. 18
Cushing, Hon. Grafton III. 21

"Dead end” occupations

Georgia I. 41; III. 65
DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. III. 43
Delaware
eight hour law
adults

IV. 50
prisoners IV. 53
legislation (1913) III. 13
Democracy

child labor and I. 84

education and I. 15, 16
Department of Labor see Federal Bureau of

Labor; Federal Children's Bureau
Dependency I. 1, 3, 4, 6, 31
Desertion see Dependency
DEVELOPING NORMAL MEN AND WOMEN: Jean

M. Gordon I. 121
District of Columbia
eight hour day

adults IV. 50

minors IV. 48
legislation needed (1914) III. 43
DOLLY DEAR II. 28
Double standard

New England and southern mills II. 57

60; IV. 64
EDGAR GARDNER MURPHY: Owen R. Lovejoy

III. 50
Editorials III. 5; IV. 5
Education

defects in present system I. 60, 171, 172
legislation (1913) III. 12-15
poverty and I. 172
vocational III. 64-68

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